6
taxa
1 plant
1 insect
4 fungi

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

bluehoneysugar

Date

May 8, 2012

Description

Ink cap seems to be one of the more known species of mushroom, perhaps because it is pretty widespread in this region. This one is the fairy ink cap. I see three general colors on the top of the fairy ink cap's umbrella: beige on the outermost, creme white in the middle, and dull brown/orange at the center. Genus coprinus have black spores, so on the other side of the umbrella is quite black. The ink caps on the photo is quite young, which I learned that for mushrooms the expansion of umbrella is the surest sign of maturity rather than its size. These ink caps have not fully spread apart but when they do the gills melt as the overall shape becomes flatter.

Photos / Sounds

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What

Ascomycetes Phylum Ascomycota

Observer

bluehoneysugar

Date

May 8, 2012

Place

UW farm (Google, OSM)

Description

Apparently, it is quite difficult to identify a cup fungus, especially if it is isolated like this one. There seems to be many possibilities in lowland Puget Sound. One thing I know about this cup fungus is that it is quite tough or resilient because somebody stepped on it right before I took this photo and it still maintained its shape as it was before it got stepped on.

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

bluehoneysugar

Date

May 8, 2012

Description

Quite common in the Pacific Northwest, Agrocybe praecox has unique cracks on top of creme white color cap. They have a dark brown spore color, which may get printed to other mushroom caps if clustered. When young, these spores are protected by veil tissues. They are really a typical mushroom that one might imagine, including the benign typical mushroom scent. The caps are soft that when you step on them your shoeprint gets printed on their caps.

Photos / Sounds

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What

flies Order Diptera

Observer

bluehoneysugar

Date

May 8, 2012

Place

UW farm (Google, OSM)

Description

A fly on a leaf. It is pretty miraculous that I snapshot a fly.

Photos / Sounds

What

Oyster Mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus

Observer

bluehoneysugar

Date

May 8, 2012

Place

UW farm (Google, OSM)

Description

I guess they sort of look like oysters...
Edible!

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

European holly Ilex aquifolium

Observer

bluehoneysugar

Date

May 8, 2012

Place

UW farm (Google, OSM)

Description

According to the King County website, English holly or European holly is often grown for ornaments but some have escaped to wild forest areas. I do not know which category this specific holly that I snapped at UW farm belongs to.
The leaves are very sharp and thorny, which might make it look pretty but you do definitely do not want to touch it. I accidentally touched it when it was covered in snow and bled. Hollies are often depicted with red berries that remind of Christmas time, unfortunately I did not find berries on the one at UW farm.