5952680200 cd1837e7b6 5952672014 e32f002f86 s 5948269522 ac54bca508 s
Photo © Marc AuMarc, some rights reserved
Saint Martin, FWI (Google, OSM) Details Hide details
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Comments & Identifications

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Cuban Treefrog - Photo (c) copepodo, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
loarie's ID: Cuban Treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis)

Cool! Looks to me like a newly metamorphosed Cuban Treefrog. The only frogs known to occur on St. Martin are Osteopilus septentrionalis, Eleutherodactylus martinicensis, and Eleutherodactylus johnstonei

Posted by loarie almost 4 years ago (Flag)
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I don't think it is a Cuban Tree Frog, even the smallest ones I've seen here are much larger. The Reptiles and Amphibians of the Eastern Caribbean lists S. ruber as present on St. Martin, although they refer to it as S. rubra.

Posted by hankplank almost 4 years ago (Flag)
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Oh, also, both Eleutherodactylus species hatch into froglets, and this one grows from tadpoles.

Posted by hankplank almost 4 years ago (Flag)
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Interesting about the Eastern Caribbean lists, I was going off CaribHerps and the IUCN range maps. Really young Cuban Tree Frogs are tiny though, and do have those distinctive marks. Check out these photos from different people on Flickr:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gkamener/3861188924/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mwitwer/5831370056/
That said, I've never seen S. ruber....

Posted by loarie almost 4 years ago (Flag)
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Wow. I guess you're right. I wouldn't have imagined them being so small and looking so different. I'll edit the observation.

Posted by hankplank almost 4 years ago (Flag)
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Cuban Treefrog - Photo (c) copepodo, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
hankplank's ID: Cuban Treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis)
Posted by hankplank almost 4 years ago (Flag)
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I was in St. Martin as an undergraduate studying Anolis pogus. I remember hearing all the Eleutherodactylus but I was never able to find one!

Posted by loarie almost 4 years ago (Flag)
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No doubt, it's hard and it took me quite a while. I eventually learned that the best place to look is under rocks in damp areas, it's pretty easy to find little ones. Also, hollow branches, which often have adults. Just looking for one by trying to follow the croak has worked for me maybe twice in two years.

Alternately, just go to Saba where they are everywhere.

Posted by hankplank almost 4 years ago (Flag)
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Cuban Treefrog - Photo (c) copepodo, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
hankplank's ID: Cuban Treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis)
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Cuban Treefrog - Photo (c) copepodo, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
Community ID: Cuban Treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis)
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loarie 1 person agrees
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