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Photo © Courtney (Nini), all rights reserved
2130 Pepperwood Preserve Road Santa Rosa, CA 95404 (Google, OSM)
38.5744498813, -122.6990040196
open

Description

Out in the grasslands of Pepperwood Preserve, I saw a couple of these white flowers coming up. They were usually in sunny places with only a few other plants around them. They also had bugs crawling around on them, and I saw them all at least one other flower of the same type.

May. 21, 2012 17:18:00 -0700
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Comments & Identifications

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bindweed - Photo (c) Kai Yan,  Joseph Wong, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-SA)
boomersoonerintexas's ID: bindweed (Family Convolvulaceae)
Posted by boomersoonerintexas over 2 years ago (Flag)
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This actually looks like Mt. St. Helena Morning Glory (which is on CNPS's Rare and Endangered Plant List). This is excellent habitat (serpentine soils) for this plant species.

Posted by protecthabitat over 2 years ago (Flag)
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I just looked up Curious George's Calystegia collina oxyphylla's (non-research-grade) observation:
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/81736#comment-18167
It looks like he observed it in the same general location at Pepperwood that you did.

Posted by protecthabitat over 2 years ago (Flag)
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I consulted with Matthew (our botanist guest speaker, iNat name "Metridium2002") and he said:
It could also be C. malacophylla, occidentalis, purpurata, or subacaulis and that it's tough to tell from the photos.
Could you add this information so he/I can help ID it?
Are the bracts large and like the sepals?
How hairy is the plant?
How dense and thick are the hairs?
How long are the pedicels compared to the petioles?

Posted by protecthabitat over 2 years ago (Flag)
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I would love to answer the questions for you, but I have no idea what "Pedicels", "Petioles", "Bracts" "Sepals", ect are. I never learned those words. But the leaves were pretty hairy, and if you want, I have a really nice enlarged picture of the flower that I could email to you (The pictures on here come up smaller than the actual picture I can see on my computer)

Posted by rowlands_courtney_3 over 2 years ago (Flag)
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Yes, please email the photo tonight (jbyrne@srcs.k12.ca.us) and I'll also email it to Matthew who is working on iNat tonight (AKA "Metridium2002").
You should have written down many of those vocabulary words during the perfect flower dissection and coloring (right after you learned about Mendel's pea plant experiments). Here is a general diagram: http://saylorplants.com/SaylorPlants/Ref_Info/Flower_001k_color_.JPG
We did add "sepal" and "pedicel" to our diagram in 3rd period I believe.
Anyhow, I'll show you a more detailed flower diagram tomorrow if you don't have time to go online tonight.

Posted by protecthabitat over 2 years ago (Flag)
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Yeah we did learn those two words, but how am I supposed to compare them with words I don't know? And I'll just have to look at you more detailed photo tomorrow during class, because I have a bunch of other finals to study for, and more homework to do before I go to bed.

Posted by rowlands_courtney_3 over 2 years ago (Flag)
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Oh, and I just sent the photos.

Posted by rowlands_courtney_3 over 2 years ago (Flag)
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Thanks, I'm just looking at them now.

Posted by protecthabitat over 2 years ago (Flag)
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Courtney, your instincts are very good. Better than mine when I was a student. Also, botanical terms are very arcane. You probably won't get the hang of this until you take at least one university level course and work hard to memorize many strange words and concepts. But even I have to keep reference books literally within arm's reach because I can't remember all of it, so don't let it get to you. I've been studying botany for 20 years and I feel like I've only scratched the surface. Also, your descriptions are very helpful. You have a good eye for this. If you enjoy it, keep at it.

Calystegia is a tricky genus because most of the species in it look very similar. You can only tell them apart by looking very closely. So you know what I'm dealing with, here is the dichotomous key:

http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_IJM.pl?key=11473

Also, see

http://www.calflora.org/cgi-bin/specieslist.cgi?where-prettyreglist=any&where-namesoup=Calystegia&where-caltranslifeform2=any&where-native=any&rel-rarity=invalue&where-rarity=any&rel-calipc=gte&rel-upper_elev_ft=gt&where-upper_elev_ft=&rel-lower_elev_ft=lt&where-lower_elev_ft=&where-pretty_plantcomm=any&where-category=any&orderby=taxon

I'm less willing than other people on iNat to go out on a limb unless I can absolutely convince myself that what I'm looking at matches the characters mentioned in the key. I never rely on photos alone, unless I can clearly see the characters that separate one species from another. Unfortunately, in Calystegia, that's difficult. The photos you sent are good: in focus, well-lit, and show different parts of the plant, just not the ones we need. :) Being able to identify something to genus is all that would be asked of you in a college class.

One thing I know about the St. Helena morning glory is that it's associated with serpentine soils, so that would be a very good thing to notice.

Posted by metridium2002 over 2 years ago (Flag)
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Calystegia - Photo (c) David Hofmann, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
metridium2002's ID: Genus Calystegia, a member of bindweed (Family Convolvulaceae)
Posted by metridium2002 over 2 years ago (Flag)
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Calystegia - Photo (c) David Hofmann, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
protecthabitat's ID: Genus Calystegia, a member of bindweed (Family Convolvulaceae)
Posted by protecthabitat over 2 years ago (Flag)
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What a great discussion! Commendations for spending so much time with this flower. I have to admit I often given up before I even start when it comes to Convolvulaceae. It's a tricky group! And if you think plant morphology has some weird terms, you should try keying out marine invertebrates! Here's a snippet from a randomly-chosen page in Light's Manual:

"Anterior swimming bell to 35 mm in length, hydroecium extends one-half the length of the bell, somatocyst long and slender, subumbrella with distinct fingerlike extension at its apex....... Diphyes dispar"

Why any oceanic creature would need an umbrella, let alone an umbrella underneath its umbrella, is beyond me.

Posted by kueda over 2 years ago (Flag)
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Calystegia - Photo (c) David Hofmann, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
rowlands_courtney_3's ID: Genus Calystegia, a member of bindweed (Family Convolvulaceae)
Posted by rowlands_courtney_3 over 2 years ago (Flag)
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Identification Summary

Calystegia - Photo (c) David Hofmann, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
rowlands_courtney_3's ID: Genus Calystegia, a member of bindweed (Family Convolvulaceae)
Calystegia - Photo (c) David Hofmann, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
Community ID: Genus Calystegia, a member of bindweed (Family Convolvulaceae)
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metridium2002 protecthabitat 2 people agree
bindweed - Photo (c) Kai Yan,  Joseph Wong, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-SA)
boomersoonerintexas's ID: bindweed (Family Convolvulaceae)

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Data Quality Assessment

Community-supported ID? Yes
2 people agree
0 people disagree
Date? Yes
Georeferenced? Yes
Photos or sounds? Yes
Is the organism wild/naturalized? Unknown
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Does the location seem accurate? Unknown
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Does the date seem accurate? Unknown
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Observation © Courtney (Nini)
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