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What

Clark's Grebe Aechmophorus clarkii

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greenrosettas

Date

March 10, 2012

Description

Fishing the incoming tide at the Hayward Shoreline.

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California manroot Marah fabacea

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greenrosettas

Date

March 3, 2012

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What

prickly sow thistle Sonchus asper ssp. asper

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greenrosettas

Date

March 30, 2012

Description

Prickly sow thistle, non-native to California.

Fungi

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greenrosettas

Date

March 30, 2012

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What

Genus Agaricus Genus Agaricus

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greenrosettas

Date

March 16, 2012

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What

Yellow Stainer (Agaricus xanthodermus) Agaricus xanthodermus

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greenrosettas

Date

March 29, 2012

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Common Puffball Lycoperdon perlatum

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greenrosettas

Date

March 16, 2012

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milk thistle Silybum marianum

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greenrosettas

Date

March 29, 2012

Description

Non-native to California.

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Pacific Banana Slug Ariolimax columbianus

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greenrosettas

Date

March 30, 2012

Description

Leona Heights Park, Oakland's best park.

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snakeroot Sanicula crassicaulis

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greenrosettas

Date

March 30, 2012

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greenrosettas

Date

March 30, 2012

Description

The Stebbin's Pile named after Robert C. Stebbins the famous Berkeley herpetologist. Otherwise known as a brush pile or a big pile of sticks, Stebbins piles offer a place of refuge for salamanders, frogs, snakes, and lizards alike. Tearing through one of these man made brush piles will reveal many of the species that can be found in the area. Also are easily constructed and can make improved habitat in restoration efforts.

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Bull Thistle Cirsium vulgare

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greenrosettas

Date

March 31, 2012

Description

Bull thistle, non-native to California.

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giant wakerobin Trillium chloropetalum

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greenrosettas

Date

March 29, 2012

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Wild Turkey Meleagris gallopavo

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greenrosettas

Date

March 29, 2012

Description

Tons of turkeys in the cemetery. Mountain view cemetery a favorite place amongst many residents of Oakland living and dead. An excellent place for a peaceful stroll or an intensive work out. Surprisingly a place of death is full of life. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ksxAkDCDcKA

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Coast Live Oak Quercus agrifolia

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greenrosettas

Date

March 29, 2012

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Candy Cap

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greenrosettas

Date

March 30, 2012

Description

I think these are Candy Caps.

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greenrosettas

Date

March 30, 2012

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Western Fence Lizard Sceloporus occidentalis

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greenrosettas

Date

March 30, 2012

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spring vetch Vicia sativa ssp. sativa

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greenrosettas

Date

March 12, 2012

Description

Non-native to California.

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Spotted cucumber beetle Diabrotica undecimpunctata

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greenrosettas

Date

March 21, 2012

Description

Seen a couple of these beetles feeding on dandelions.

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What

wall barley Hordeum murinum

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greenrosettas

Date

March 10, 2012

Description

I think this is foxtails, but I am still trying to learn my grasses.

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greenrosettas

Date

March 8, 2012

Description

Part of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). Non-native to California. Another common name is Lesser swine-cress or swine water cress. Edible cooked or raw.

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Observer

greenrosettas

Date

March 10, 2012

Description

Waste of a space, wasted space space wasted or possibly space waste, no matter what way you spray it, these empty lots, roadsides, abandon buildings, forgotten yards are entirely under-appreciated. I feel that many of these "waste spaces" are places of much interest. Yes, to the adventurous naturalist looking for the rare jeweled flower or the frog with 8 spots instead of 5 might have to look elsewhere than an vacant lot, but all the same there are very interesting natural history stories being told within the confines of these chain linked acreages. One that I find most interesting is the story of recolonization of living organisms into a place of once cleared of anything visibly viable. Most of these heroine species doing the hard work of reclaiming lost ground are more commonly known as weeds and yes even invasive. Still, the work of slowly bring back to life a space once void is amazing to me. Not to mention that many of those "weeds" are either eatable or medicinal. Consider the Tropaeolum found in this waste space, flower & leaves are edible and same of course for the mustard or wild radish. Of course I am always excited to see a native propping its head out of the ground. Especially when I see a building torn down and cleared away only to reveal a field of poppies, yarrow, and arroyo lupines. As the story of succession continues and the plants begin to take hold other residents move in, ladybugs, aphids, ants, crickets, mice, rats, sparrows, finches, morning doves, falcons, hawks, racoons, and so on. And if that that waste space is truly wasted, then quite possibly a native oak or some other tree begins to take root. Of course more often than not the space is once again cleared and paved over to make room for the burgeoning population, but with that people might want to take another closer and longer look at that empty yard.

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Cedar Waxwing Bombycilla cedrorum

Observer

greenrosettas

Date

March 8, 2012

Description

Seen this flock of 40 strong Cedar Waxwings hanging around our neighborhood for the last couple of days. In particular feeding on some cotoneaster bushes near my house (http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/37220). They literally ate every berry that was on that bush within two days. Even during a strong rainstorm they were out there taking turns flying down from perches to the bush to snag a berry then fly off letting the next bird in line grab their lunch. A berry handsome bird and an absolute treat to watch over the last couple days while drinking my coffee.

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forget-me-not Genus Myosotis

Observer

greenrosettas

Date

March 4, 2012

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What

Italian thistle Carduus pycnocephalus

Observer

greenrosettas

Date

March 10, 2012

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Sweet Cherry Prunus avium

Observer

greenrosettas

Date

March 4, 2012

Description

Non-native to California.

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What

manzanita Genus Arctostaphylos

Observer

greenrosettas

Date

March 4, 2012

Description

This was a rather large manzanita with leaves I had never seen before. Full in flower there were a pair of bees that seemed to be protecting the shrub. Anytime another pollinator would visit a blossom the bees would fly over and make the intruder buzz off. Watched the behavior for about 10 minutes not exactly sure what I was witnessing, but very interesting none-the-less. The bees were very dark almost black, but didn't seem to me to be carpenter bees. The manzanita I'm not entirely sure on either possibly Arctostaphylos pallida

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What

Fremont's Deathcamas Toxicoscordion fremontii

Observer

greenrosettas

Date

March 4, 2012
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