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What

Eastern Gray Squirrel Sciurus carolinensis

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 31, 2012

Description

The Eastern Gray Squirrel is the only species of squirrel you will find on UW campus because it is a very aggressive squirrel and chased the Western Gray off campus entirely. They are very urbanized and will often be in garbage cans and foraging on the ground for nuts.

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What

Artist's Bracket Ganoderma applanatum

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 24, 2012

Description

This fungus is commonly referred to as a shelf fungus because of its flat shape and grows perpendicular to the tree. It is usually brown and can be found on almost any tree.

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What

Meadow buttercup Ranunculus acris

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 24, 2012

Description

The buttercup is easily recognizable because of the bright yellow petals. This species is different than buttercups found in lawns or grassy parks because it grows roughly 10-12 inches off the ground.

Photos / Sounds

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What

Queen Anne's Lace Daucus carota

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 24, 2012

Description

Queen Anne's Lace grows tall in comparison to the other flowering plants found in this area and does not have much color to it. The flower itself is flat and round at the top of the stem and looks like a lace pattern.

Photos / Sounds

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What

Garden Lupin Lupinus polyphyllus

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 24, 2012

Description

This lupin has pink flowers that droop down from the leaves and open at the base. The leaves are pointed and narrow.

Photos / Sounds

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Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 24, 2012

Description

You can recognize this type of mushroom because of the dark purple and black coloring. They grow in clusters and in urban areas.

Photos / Sounds

What

Pleated Inkcap Parasola plicatilis

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 24, 2012

Description

Also known as the japanse-parasol mushroom because of its resemblance to the parasol with the ridged cap. The first picture shows an older mushroom and the second is a newly sprouted one, you can tell by the red cap.

Photos / Sounds

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Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 24, 2012

Description

This is also known as yellow-jelly fungus and is the first to appear after rainfall. It can grow all season but usually during the fall-spring because of more rain.

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Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 24, 2012

Description

The stereum fungus can be identified by its orange color and its somewhat flaky appearance.

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What

Tramedes

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 24, 2012

Description

This fungus resembles the turkey-tail in the way it fans out from the tree except it is all white.

Photos / Sounds

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Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 24, 2012

Description

This type of fungus is black and looks like lava rocks. It grows in clumps and usually on logs or trees.

Photos / Sounds

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Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 24, 2012

Description

Ladybugs are commonly found in grassy areas and open fields around flowers. Their bodies are all red with black spots lining its back.

Photos / Sounds

What

Turtle

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 24, 2012

Description

The turtle was black with only a little bit of coloring on its head. I was too far away to get a close enough look but the color was either red or yellow in two streaks. It is not very big, smaller than a large pizza.

Photos / Sounds

What

Trembling Aspen (Populus tremuloides) Populus tremuloides

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 24, 2012

Description

The aspen tree is very common to this area and originated in North America. The white, smooth bark is unique to the aspen tree and grows a lot in the marshy area.

Photos / Sounds

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What

Rock Dove (Columba livia) Columba livia

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 22, 2012

Description

The pigeon closer to the camera was all white with some black on its wings. The pigeon farther away is more commonly seen with the sky blue and purple markings.

Photos / Sounds

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Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 22, 2012

Description

Fire moss or red-roof moss is a very common and easy to identify type of moss in the northwest. It can grow basically anywhere and is found on most concrete walls on campus. The red coloring makes it distinct from other kinds of mosses.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 22, 2012

Description

This tree is tall and has vertical bunches of a yellow flower hanging off most of its branches. The flowers themselves open up and have roughly five petals.

Photos / Sounds

What

Horse-Chestnut Aesculus hippocastanum

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 22, 2012

Description

The chestnut has spiky green ball seeds that fall in autumn and a white flower in the spring. The leaves look like an elongated oval.

Photos / Sounds

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What

English Elm Ulmus minor

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 22, 2012

Description

The English Elm is a deciduous tree with water resistant wood. The seeds on this tree are sterile and look like wafers. On campus the seeds can be found everywhere on the ground in the spring.

Photos / Sounds

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What

Giant sequoia Sequoiadendron giganteum

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 22, 2012

Description

The sequoia has been cultivated in the northwest and originates in California. They grow up to 300 feet tall and is the world's largest tree in volume. The base of the tree is very large in circumference and usually grows with cedars.

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What

Common Snowberry Symphoricarpos albus

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 22, 2012

Description

The leaves on the plant are pointy and opposite. The berries are a pale greenish-whitish color and grow in the center of the plant itself.

Photos / Sounds

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What

Ginkgo Ginkgo biloba

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 22, 2012

Description

This is clearly a Ginkgo Biloba tree because of the fan-like leaves. The tree is found in several places on campus and has been present in the area for generations. Also, this ginkgo is a male because the seeds of a female tree smell like vomit.

Photos / Sounds

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What

maples Genus Acer

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 16, 2012

Description

This is a common type of maple identified easily by its leaf shape.

Photos / Sounds

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Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 16, 2012

Description

This flower resembles a daisy but the petals are more round and are purple. They have long stems and grow in the crevices of rocks.

Photos / Sounds

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What

oaks (Genus Quercus) Genus Quercus

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 16, 2012

Description

This kind of tree was found in several places around Ravenna and Green Lake and has leaves that look like an arugula plant.

Photos / Sounds

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What

daisy Chrysanthemum majus

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 16, 2012

Description

Daisies like these white ones are found all over the grassy lawn around green lake and in the median along Ravenna. They grow in clusters.

Photos / Sounds

What

larches (Genus Larix) Genus Larix

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 16, 2012

Description

I believe this is some kind of fir tree because of the bark and needles, however the pine cones are reddish and the branches hand down lower instead of sticking straight out like other fir trees.

Photos / Sounds

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What

Fungus

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 16, 2012

Description

On this leaf there is some kind of fungus growing through the bottom of the leaf and sticking up through the top. The fungus is red and pointy at the tip and covers the whole surface of the leaf. Not all of the leaves on this plant had the fungus but at least five did.

Photos / Sounds

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What

American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) Corvus brachyrhynchos

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 16, 2012

Description

Crows are found just about anywhere, especially parks. This bird was on the ground scavenging for food.

Photos / Sounds

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What

seagulls Genus Larus

Observer

karavanslyck

Date

May 16, 2012

Description

Seagulls are extremely common around the northwest and can be found in flocks. They are mostly around bodies of water, such as Green Lake, and in parks or other urban areas.

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