Icon
Photos / Sounds
Observer
Place
Actions

Photos / Sounds

Observer

pete_woods

Date

January 26, 2012 02:07 PM EST
Fungi

Photos / Sounds

6656847107 70a5ce6631 s

What

Fungi including Lichens Kingdom Fungi

Observer

pete_woods

Date

January 7, 2012 01:00 PM EST

Photos / Sounds

6838970449 7b57aae83d s

What

Ruffle Lichens Genus Parmotrema

Observer

pete_woods

Date

January 31, 2012 02:11 PM EST

Description

Probably P. hypotropum, which is known from Frick Park.

Photos / Sounds

6810011813 eed107d0cb s

What

Common Greenshield Lichen Flavoparmelia caperata

Observer

pete_woods

Date

January 14, 2012 12:26 PM EST

Description

~ 3 inches across

Photos / Sounds

What

Orange-cored Shadow Lichen Phaeophyscia rubropulchra

Observer

pete_woods

Date

January 14, 2012 11:50 AM EST

Photos / Sounds

6656790695 48b6827be0 s

Observer

pete_woods

Date

January 7, 2012 01:00 PM EST

Photos / Sounds

6656790493 4b7378f51f s

What

Eastern Garter Snake Thamnophis sirtalis ssp. sirtalis

Observer

pete_woods

Date

January 7, 2012 01:00 PM EST

Photos / Sounds

6809921529 ccc692809a s

Observer

pete_woods

Date

January 14, 2012 12:04 PM EST

Description

This little fungus specializes on this one species of bracket fungus.

Photos / Sounds

6799040259 9e03ae1f97 s

What

Beard Lichens Genus Usnea

Observer

pete_woods

Date

January 26, 2012 01:42 PM EST

Description

Air pollution extirpated this whole genus of lichens from Pennsylvania about a hundred years ago. So why it was growing in Frick Park, in the middle of Pittsburgh, the air pollution capitol of the east, I do not know.

It was growing on an ash tree, attached to the trunk where the trunk was about 3 inches wide. The lichen clump is about 4 inches wide, with the longest branch about 4 inches long. The tree was infested with emerald ash borer, and had been recently cut down.

This may be an isolated waif, or it may be part of a larger population. I still have to do a better search of the immediate area, and of other ash trees around the park, to see if there are any other colonies.

The elastic cord inside each stem clearly identifies this as an Usnea. There are 9 species of this genus historically known from Pennsylvania; I haven't yet figured out which species this is or if any other Usneas have been collected in recent decades.

Feeds: Atom KML