Icon
Photos / Sounds
Observer
Place
Actions

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

checker lily (Fritillaria affinis) Fritillaria affinis

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 03:22 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Indian paintbrush Castilleja coccinea

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 03:09 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Lewis's mock-orange Philadelphus lewisii

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 02:39 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

sara orangetip (Anthocharis sara) Anthocharis sara

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 02:31 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Western Fence Lizard Sceloporus occidentalis

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 02:22 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Saskatoon Amelanchier alnifolia

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 02:19 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Brown's Peony (Paeonia brownii) Paeonia brownii

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 02:03 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Wolf Lichen (Letharia vulpina) Letharia vulpina

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 01:26 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Common Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) Achillea millefolium

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 01:24 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Thyme-leaved Speedwell Veronica serpyllifolia

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 01:42 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 01:30 PM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of the area in which this was found, please see the journal entry for May 12, 2012 here on iNaturalist (titled "lunch stop area"). This neon green lichen was found growing all over the coniferous trees at that area. It was one of the more commonly spotted lichens of that particular area, especially since it was so easy to see by its bright coloration. It was growing in small patches all over the trees' bark along with other lichen species. This is a foliose species, though it is hard to tell in the picture I got. The lichen I am referring to in the picture is the small, yellow one.

Photos / Sounds

What

Poison Hemlock Conium maculatum

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 12:00 PM PDT

Description

For more information about the habitat, vegetation, and weather of this area, see the journal entry for May 12, 2012 here on iNaturalist. This hemlock was growing just off the path and gave us plenty of trouble identifying it because it hadn't flowered yet. The leaves and stalk gave it away.

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 11:54 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of Money Creek, the area in which this species was found, please see the journal entry for May 12, 2012 here on iNaturalist. These teeny tiny reddish mushrooms were found growing in a small hole in the log on which the oyster mushroom was found. When the cap was broken off, it leaked a red fluid, which was a good indicator of its species. At full size, these mushrooms are about 3 to 4 inches tall and the caps are about 4 centimeters wide.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Common Ink Cap (Coprinopsis atramentaria) Coprinopsis atramentaria

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 11:54 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of Money Creek, the area in which this species was found, please see the journal entry for May 12, 2012 here on iNaturalist. This inky cap was found growing in a shady area under some western red cedars behind the decomposing log on which the oyster mushroom was found at Money Creek. It is a very common fungus here in North America and is one of the edible species, though it is poisonous when taken with alcohol. The mushrooms often grow in disturbed areas and appear in late spring to early summer. The cap will eventually flatten out and then melt.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Oyster Mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 11:53 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of Money Creek, the area in which this species was found, please see the journal entry for May 12, 2012 here on iNaturalist. This mushroom was found growing on a partially decomposed log on the side facing away from the trail. This is a very common edible mushroom and is also a white rot species, meaning it eats away at the lignin in the wood. This standard oyster mushroom can grow pretty much anywhere, though there are some subspecies that only grow on trees. This specimen was rather small, only about an inch wide.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Pacific trillium Trillium ovatum

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 11:44 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of Money Creek, the area in which this species was found, please see the journal entry for May 12, 2012 here on iNaturalist. This trillium ovatum was a common sight on the forest floor at this camp ground. It was surrounded by other similar plants, though this was the only one I could find that was flowering. It had large, oval shaped leaves and a striking large, purple flower with skinny petals. It is common in the western United States and often grows in the shade of western red cedars and bigleaf maples, as this specimen was.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Polyporus badius Royoporus badius

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 10:47 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of Index, the forest in which this specimen was found, please see the journal entry for May 12, 2012 here on iNaturalist. This mushroom was found on the side of the road and was picked up for examination purposes. The cap was about 3 inches across and frilled. Its name refers to the fact that the mushroom has many pores in it. The cap was a shiny red-brown color and the stem was extremely short and white. I did not see any others like it in that area.

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 10:44 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of Index, the forest in which this specimen was found, please see the journal entry for May 12, 2012 here on iNaturalist. This pacific bleeding heart was found growing on the side of the road at the Index forest. There were only a couple others like it in that same area, but I have seen this before at my house and on the UW campus. The flowers were a soft purple color, bell shaped, and drooped heavily. The leaves were fern-like and fairly short compared to the stalks the flowers were growing on.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Yellow-spotted Millipede Harpaphe haydeniana

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 10:37 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of Index, the forest in which this specimen was found, please see the journal entry for May 12, 2012 here on iNaturalist. This small millipede was found crawling on a rotten log in the Index forest. Another individual was seen on another log close to the first one. It caught my eye because of its striking yellow spots against the black body. I had never seen a millipede so wide before this as most of them are very slim and dark to light brown. This individual was about 2 inches long and it prefers to live underground or under leaf litter. When threatened, it exudes a cyanide compound that is highly poisonous.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

drops-of-gold (Prosartes hookeri) Prosartes hookeri

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 10:37 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of Index, the forest in which this specimen was found, please see the journal entry for May 12, 2012 here on iNaturalist. This plant is native to western North America and is also known as "drops of gold". It prefers shady, damp areas like the one it was found growing in. This plant was very scarce in the under story, growing in only a couple places such as on this nurse log in the picture. The leaves were large and oval shaped. The flowers bloom in the summer and are small and white. It also produces orange to red berries.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

northern wood fern Dryopteris expansa

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 10:33 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of Index, the forest in which this specimen was found, please see the journal entry for May 12, 2012 here on iNaturalist. This wood fern was one of the species of lesser abundance on the forest floor. It grew in large clumps and each frond was about 2 feet tall. This fern is actually a hybrid species, its parents being Dryopteris intermedia and an unknown Dryopteris species thought to be extinct.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

false lily of the valley Maianthemum dilatatum

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 10:30 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of Index, the forest in which this specimen was found, please see the journal entry for May 12, 2012 here on iNaturalist. This false lily of the valley was a common sight in the under story of this particular forest. It grew in large carpets all over the forest floor. I had seen this species on the UW campus and not known what it was, so I'm glad I got the chance to learn about it on this trip. This plant is also known as snakeberry and two-leaved Solomon's seal and it produces a non-flowering shoot, a shoot with small, white flowers, and red, speckled berries. This particular specimen had the non-flowering shoots.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 10:02 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of the Riparian Zone this specimen came from, please see the journal entry specific to that location from May 12, 2012. This snail was found sitting in some dead leaves on the same island of greenery that I found the sheep sorrel and sweet vernal grass. It had a small, spotted, yellowish shell with a single black stripe running along its length. Its body was yellow-gray and it had short eye-stalks. The snail was very shy and it took some patience to get it to poke its head out of its shell. This species is not native to the United States, but it has been introduced here and has not managed to do as well as the brown-lipped snail. This snail is very tolerant of wetter, colder areas like those in western Washington.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Sheep Sorrel Rumex acetosella

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 10:00 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of the Riparian Zone this specimen came from, please see the journal entry specific to that location from May 12, 2012. This sheep sorrel was found growing in the same little island of greenery that I found the sweet vernal grass in. The sheep sorrel was growing in a small patch and had small, arrow shaped leaves with smaller maroon flowers. This particular specimen had flowered at this point. This plant has edible leaves that taste like lemon. It is related to spinach, but should not be eaten in large amounts. It is considered an extremely noxious weed and is very hard to control.

Photos / Sounds

What

sweet vernal grass (Anthoxanthum odoratum) Anthoxanthum odoratum

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 09:48 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of the Riparian Zone this specimen came from, please see the journal entry specific to that location from May 12, 2012. This species of grass was growing in small patches in various places along the trail. This one in particular came from a small island of greenery in the middle of the gravel parking lot at the riparian zone. This grass is another invasive species native to California that was flowering at this time of year. It throws up white flower spikes that catch pollen.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) Fallopia japonica

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 09:39 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of the Riparian Zone this specimen came from, please see the journal entry specific to that location from May 12, 2012. This plant is an invasive species native to eastern Asia that happens to do very well here in North America where it has become common. These plants were growing in the sandy soil near the edge of the river in great abundance, making up a large amount of the plants of the under story. They had not flowered yet, though they will in late summer to early fall. These plants commonly inhabit riparian environments, so it makes sense that it was growing in such great abundance in the area I found it.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Herb Robert Geranium robertianum

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 09:35 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of the Riparian Zone this specimen came from, please see the journal entry specific to that location from May 12, 2012. This "stinky bob" was growing individually all over the sides of the trail on the paths around the river. All of them had their small, purple flowers out now. This one in particular was growing near some salmonberry, trailing blackberry, and other low growing plants. Apparently it smells bad, but I think it just smells very strongly in a way that isn't necessarily "stinky".

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Beaked Hazelnut Corylus cornuta

Observer

tessaf

Date

May 12, 2012 09:32 AM PDT

Description

For more information on the habitat, vegetation, and weather of the Riparian Zone this specimen came from, please see the journal entry specific to that location from May 12, 2012. This beaked hazelnut was growing on the side of the path alongside some bigleaf maples and some low growing plants like salmonberry. The hazelnut had its catkins out, which are visible in the picture, and was about 10 feet tall. The leaves reminded me of those on a dogwood tree, as they had many toothed ridges and were fuzzy on the underside. The tree did not have any nuts on it yet, at least not that I could see. The catkins form in autumn and then fall and pollinate every spring.

Redo search in map area
Feeds: Atom KML