Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Very common.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Attached to slipper shell attached to bottle. Often found in clusters attached to dead shells.

Four shells in this cluster.

Large specimen with jagged ventral margin:

H: 31.3 mm
W: 31.4 mm

O. equestris is distinguished by the row of teeth along the posterior side of the right (top) valve and pits along the anterior side, with the reverse the case on the left (bottom) valve that attaches to the substrate.

Although not discernible in these photos with the valves open, the right valve is smaller than the left, and nestles inside the left valve's elevated margin. Look closely at the slide with arrows.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Live taken via hand dredge among sand and grass.

H: 4.5 mm
W: 7.8 mm

Photos / Sounds

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Live taken via hand dredge among sand and grass.

H: 5.2 mm
W: 6.5 mm

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Live taken via hand dredge among sand and grass.

Photos / Sounds

What

Greedy dove shell Costoanachis avara

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Found attached to slipper shell. Photo of live animal in tray.

This species normally very common among seagrass.

H: 12 mm

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Lineate dove snail Suturoglypta iontha

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Among sand and grass. Live taken via hand dredge.

Shell is decolate.

H: 7.1 mm

Photos / Sounds

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Although many identify shells that look like this as S. rustica, it is doubtful that S. rustica is present in Florida. See discussion at:

http://z14.invisionfree.com/Conchologist_Forum/index.php?showtopic=735

Photos / Sounds

What

Common Slipper Shell Crepidula fornicata

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

C. fornicata is the largest and by far the most commonly found slipper shell in Florida, especially on beaches. It is quite variable in shape and color, inside and out. It can be identified by the shape of the edge of the interior deck (when present). The deck is white with the edge strongly sinuate with two "waves."

Exterior color usually a white background with tan to brown blotches or radiating lines. Interior may range from all white to browns or purple, and may be streaked, spotted or all one color. Live specimens usually covered by a brown to tan periostracum.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Almeja de arca Lunarca ovalis

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dean on sand.

Largest specimen:

H: 32 mm
W: 36.1 mm

Photos / Sounds

What

Cross-barred Venus Chione elevata

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead on sand.

Largest: H: 28 mm W: 34.3 mm

Extremely common at all times I've collected here.

Photos / Sounds

What

Lightning pitar Pitar fulminatus

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead on sand. Very common and always found when collecting at Sebastian.

Spotted specimen:

H: 27.2 mm
W: 33 mm

Brownish-orange specimen:

H: 23.5 mm
W: 29.1 mm

P. fulminatus is thin, but strong-shelled, and rather plump. Exterior of live or fresh-dead specimens has a chalky periostracum-like covering over the ventral portion. Examine dorsal hinge area to help confirm ID. Beaks pointed, very close and turned anteriorly. Lunule a wide oval, covered with growth lines, and bounded by a groove. Escutcheon absent. Exterior ligament tan and completely on posterior side of beaks.

Photos / Sounds

What

Transverse Ark Clam Anadara transversa

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead on sand.

H: 22 mm
W: 26 mm

Key characters to recognize A. transversa are white shell with 30-35 undivided radial ribs, right valve is smaller so that margin of left valve extends farther, rough, dark brown periostracum usually worn off except around margins, and ligament is black, narrow, long extending far to the posterior side.

Is Florida’s smallest Anadara; usually about 20 mm wide, rarely over 35 mm.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead on sand. There were several hundred.

Specimens in photos range from 18.2 mm to 22 mm.

Photos / Sounds

What

Giant Atlantic Cockle Dinocardium robustum

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead on sand.

H: 70 mm
W: 65.3 mm

Photos / Sounds

What

Stiff Pen Shell Atrina rigida

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead in sand.

H: 140 mm
W: 51 mm

Photos / Sounds

What

Lettered Olive Americoliva sayana

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead on sand.

31.9 mm

Photos / Sounds

What

eastern auger Terebra dislocata

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead on sand.

32.2 mm

Photos / Sounds

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead on soft sand among sparse grass.

H: 31.3 mm
W: 35.1 mm

Photos / Sounds

What

Cross-hatched Lucine Divalinga quadrisulcata

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead on sand.

H: 5.4 mm
W: 6.6 mm

Photos / Sounds

Observer

marlo

Date

August 24, 2011

Description

Not uncommon at one time. However, this date is the last time I've seen this species live at Sebastian.

Specimen with flammules 29.2 mm

Other specimen 27.5 mm

On mangrove leaves

Photos / Sounds

What

Elegant dosinia Dosinia elegans

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead on sand

Height: 48.2 mm
Width: 52.4 mm

Photos / Sounds

What

Disk Dosinia Dosinia discus

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead on sand.

Height: 56.8 mm
Width: 62.3 mm

Photos / Sounds

What

White Atlantic Semele Semele proficua

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead on sand

Photos / Sounds

What

Giant tun Tonna galea

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead on sand.

84 mm

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

This beautiful species was once common in Brevard County in the early 1990's as far north as the Banana River. Since about 1996, I have not seen it live anywhere in Brevard County and rarely dead at Sebastian Inlet.

Photos / Sounds

What

Pear Whelk Busycotypus spiratus

Observer

marlo

Date

April 17, 2015

Description

Dead among sand and grass inside Sebastian Inlet.

Three position composite photo is after cleaning. Included are two photos of the unlucky inhabitant (Clibanarius vittatus), the Thinstriped Hermit Crab, when found.

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Razorbill Alca torda

Observer

miwasatoshi

Date

January 10, 2013

Description

Part of winter 2012-2013 Razorbill irruption

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Northern Gannet Morus bassanus

Observer

miwasatoshi

Date

November 30, 2008