Photos / Sounds

What

American Dipper Cinclus mexicanus

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 04:50 PM PDT

Description

Dipper at small cascade of North Fork Teanaway River, Kittitas County, Washington
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Dipper
Cinclus mexicanus, Water Ouzel
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dipper

i071908 177

Photos / Sounds

2686864414_6ea2855807_s

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 11:47 AM PDT

Description

Ivesia tweedyi
Tweedy's ivesia, Tweedy's mousetail

Fortune Creek Pass, Teanaway, Kittitas County, Washington

i071908 093

Photos / Sounds

2686063621_72cffebfcb_s

What

Columbian lewisia Lewisia columbiana

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 12:41 PM PDT

Description

Lewisia columbiana

Lewisia columbiana at USDA Plants Profile
Lewisia columbiana at Burke Museum, University of Washington

Fortune Creek Pass, Teanaway
Kittitas County, Washington
i071908 110

Photos / Sounds

What

glacier lily Erythronium grandiflorum

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 11:35 AM PDT

Description

Erythronium grandiflorum Glacier Lily

Erythronium grandiflorum Pursh on PLANTS Profile

Species Erythronium grandiflorum Pursh – yellow avalanche-lily

Fortune Creek Pass, Teanaway,
Kittitas County, Washington, USA

i071908 081

Photos / Sounds

What

shooting star Genus Dodecatheon

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 11:30 AM PDT

Description

Field of Shooting Stars, Ascending to Fortune Creek Pass, Teanaway, Kittitas County, Washington

i071908 078

Photos / Sounds

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 11:25 AM PDT

Description

Castilleja elmeri Cream-yellow paintbrush, Ascending to Fortune Creek Pass, Teanaway, Kittitas County, Washington

i071908 074

Photos / Sounds

2686814296_c25821252b_s

What

shooting star Genus Dodecatheon

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 11:09 AM PDT

Description

Shooting stars - Ascending to Fortune Creek Pass, Teanaway, Kittitas County, Washington

i071908 059

Photos / Sounds

2686009831_760a9aa1a8_s

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 11:18 AM PDT

Description

Polystichum lemmonii the signature fern for serpentine soil

Arthur Kruckeberg: "Of the western ferns on serpentine, only Polystichum lemmonii is obligate,"
Source Hardy Fern Library

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

A serpentine soil is derived from ultramafic rocks, in particular serpentinite, a rock formed by the hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle.
The soils derived from ultramafic bedrock give rise to unusual and sparse associations of edaphic (and often endemic) plants that are tolerant of extreme soil conditions, including:
low calcium:magnesium ratio
lack of essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus and
high concentrations of the heavy metals (more common in ultramafic rocks)

These plants are commonly called serpentine endemics, if they grow only on these soils. (Serpentinite is composed of the mineral serpentine, but the two terms are often both used to mean the rock, not its mineral composition.)

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_soil accessed 14 Aug 2010

Esmerelda Basin
Teanaway, Kittitas Co. Washington, USA
On serpentine rock and soil
i071908 067

Photos / Sounds

2686796820_ab0caff7be_s

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 10:37 AM PDT

Description

Bracted Lousewort

Esmerelda Basin, Teanaway, Kittitas County, Washington

i071908 046

Photos / Sounds

2686795000_0dd7fc30d1_s

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 10:16 AM PDT

Description

Wintergreen, Pyrola picta

Esmerelda Basin, Teanaway, Kittitas County, Washington

They are mixotrophs "obtain a portion of their food through mycorrhizal fungi attached to other green plants, but can make some of their food in their own leaves."

i071908 041

Photos / Sounds

2686812408_fabc6a11a9_s

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 11:05 AM PDT

Description

Castilleja elmeri Yellow-cream paintbrush,

Ascending to Fortune Creek Pass, Teanaway, Kittitas County, Washington

i071908 058

Photos / Sounds

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 10:07 AM PDT

Description

Platanthera on USDA PLANTS profile

Platanthera dilatata White Bog Orchid, Esmerelda Basin, Teanaway, Kittitas county, Washington

i071908 034

Photos / Sounds

What

five-fingered fern Adiantum aleuticum

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 09:53 AM PDT

Description

Maidenhair fern Adiantum aleuticum

Esmerelda Basin, Teanaway, Washington

i071908 031

Photos / Sounds

What

Elephant's Head Pedicularis groenlandica

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 09:40 AM PDT

Description

Pedicularis groenlandica on PLANTS profile

Species Pedicularis groenlandica Retz. – elephanthead lousewort

growing in a wet alpine meadow

Esmerelda Basin, Teanaway, Washington

i071908 024

Photos / Sounds

What

Pacific Fritillary Boloria epithore

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 09:27 AM PDT

Description

Meadow Fritillary (Boloria bellona) on bugguide
Thanks to Kaylee Skylyn for the ID

Esmerelda Basin, Teanaway

i071908 021

Photos / Sounds

2686763970_61a704b2fb_s

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 09:11 AM PDT

Description

Penstemon rupicola, Esmerelda Basin, Teanaway

i071908 011

Photos / Sounds

What

Common Butterwort Pinguicula vulgaris

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 09:08 AM PDT

Description

Pinguicula vulgaris, Insectivourous butterwort, Esmerelda Basin, Teanaway

i071908 008

Photos / Sounds

What

scarlet gilia Ipomopsis aggregata

Observer

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Date

July 19, 2008 09:04 AM PDT

Description

Scarlet Gilia, Esmerelda Basin, Teanaway

i071908 004

Photos / Sounds

3978200457_e037c43ca3_s

What

Subalpine larch Larix lyallii

Observer

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Date

August 8, 2009 02:50 PM PDT

Description

Larches at Headlight Basin

i090909 338

Photos / Sounds

3978956498_0319cc6f6d_s

What

Monkeyflowers Genus Mimulus

Observer

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Date

August 8, 2009 01:40 PM PDT

Description

Mimulus on Ingalls saddle not sure what species - my bst estimate (with help from Belinda) is that this is Mimulus tilingii based on the facts that

1) M. guttatus stems have more flowers, often over five; M. tilingii often has only one-to-three flowers per stem.

Ingalls Lake Trail

about 1800 meters (6000 feet)

Photos / Sounds

What

fell-fields claytonia Claytonia megarhiza

Observer

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Date

August 8, 2009 12:29 PM PDT

Description

Claytonia megarhiza var. megarhiza
Portulacaceae Dicot
Claytonia megarhiza at Burke Museum

Claytonia megarhiza at PLANTS profile USDA

Genus Claytonia L. – springbeauty
Species Claytonia megarhiza (A. Gray) Parry ex S. Watson – alpine springbeauty

Ingalls Lake trail, Teanaway, Kittitas County, Washington, USA

i090909 294

Photos / Sounds

3978882020_db7b6971e0_s

What

Lemmon's holly fern Polystichum lemmonii

Observer

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Date

August 8, 2009 12:19 PM PDT

Description

Although I wonder if this might be Polystichum kruckebergii; Kruckeberg's Sword Fern ???

Polystichum lemmonii the signature fern for serpentine soil

Arthur Kruckeberg: "Of the western ferns on serpentine, only Polystichum lemmonii is obligate,"
Source Hardy Fern Library

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

A serpentine soil is derived from ultramafic rocks, in particular serpentinite, a rock formed by the hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle.
The soils derived from ultramafic bedrock give rise to unusual and sparse associations of edaphic (and often endemic) plants that are tolerant of extreme soil conditions, including:
low calcium:magnesium ratio
lack of essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus and
high concentrations of the heavy metals (more common in ultramafic rocks)

These plants are commonly called serpentine endemics, if they grow only on these soils. (Serpentinite is composed of the mineral serpentine, but the two terms are often both used to mean the rock, not its mineral composition.)

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_soil accessed 14 Aug 2010

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

Ingalls Lake trail, Teanaway, Kittitas County, Washington, USA
next to a large serpentine rock
My other Shasta Fern photos

i090909 280

Tags

Photos / Sounds

Observer

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Date

August 8, 2009 11:04 AM PDT

Description

On serpentine rock, Ingalls Lake trail, Kittitas County, Washington, USA

i090909 242

Tags

Photos / Sounds

3978840584_5b8bb8e7f6_s

Observer

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Date

August 8, 2009 10:48 AM PDT

Description

On serpentine rock and soil, Ingalls Lake trail, Kittitas County, Washington, USA

From Mark Egger:
"Castilleja elmeri, in one of it's many other color forms. This is a serpentine endemic. It's by far the most common paintbrush along the Ingall's Lake trail"

i090909 235

Tags

Photos / Sounds

3978840250_14fc337319_s

What

Balloon Milkvetch Astragalus whitneyi

Observer

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Date

August 8, 2009 10:31 AM PDT

Description

Astragalus whitneyi

On serpentine rock and soil, Ingalls Lake trail, Kittitas County, Washington, USA

i090909 234

Tags

Photos / Sounds

Observer

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Date

August 8, 2009 10:29 AM PDT

Description

Castilleja elmeri growing with Polystichum lemmonii - Shasta Fern
From Mark Egger:
" this species comes in many color forms, all of them beautiful. I have almost 200 pics of it from various places in the Cascades -- I'll post them (some) at some timein the future. Most are either yellow (like this) or intense red, but they also vary to coppery orange and, in one population, pink to magenta."

On serpentine rock and soil, Ingalls Lake trail, Kittitas County, Washington, USA

i090909 229

Tags

Photos / Sounds

3975335181_bf9d3548b5_s

What

Lemmon's holly fern Polystichum lemmonii

Observer

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Date

August 8, 2009 10:29 AM PDT

Description

Polystichum lemmonii the signature fern for serpentine soil growing with Castilleja elmeri

Arthur Kruckeberg: "Of the western ferns on serpentine, only Polystichum lemmonii is obligate,"
Source Hardy Fern Library

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

A serpentine soil is derived from ultramafic rocks, in particular serpentinite, a rock formed by the hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle.
The soils derived from ultramafic bedrock give rise to unusual and sparse associations of edaphic (and often endemic) plants that are tolerant of extreme soil conditions, including:
low calcium:magnesium ratio
lack of essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus and
high concentrations of the heavy metals (more common in ultramafic rocks)

These plants are commonly called serpentine endemics, if they grow only on these soils. (Serpentinite is composed of the mineral serpentine, but the two terms are often both used to mean the rock, not its mineral composition.)

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_soil accessed 14 Aug 2010

On serpentine rock and soil, Ingalls Lake trail, Kittitas County, Washington, USA

i090909 228

Photos / Sounds

3975334571_9e43c84e02_s

What

maidenhair ferns Genus Adiantum

Observer

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Date

August 8, 2009 10:12 AM PDT

Description

Adiantum pedatum maidenhair fern

On serpentine rock and soil, Ingalls Lake trail, Kittitas County, Washington, USA

i090909 226

Tags

Photos / Sounds

What

Lemmon's holly fern Polystichum lemmonii

Observer

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Date

August 8, 2009 10:12 AM PDT

Description

Polystichum lemmonii the signature fern for serpentine soil

Arthur Kruckeberg: "Of the western ferns on serpentine, only Polystichum lemmonii is obligate,"
Source Hardy Fern Library

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

A serpentine soil is derived from ultramafic rocks, in particular serpentinite, a rock formed by the hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle.
The soils derived from ultramafic bedrock give rise to unusual and sparse associations of edaphic (and often endemic) plants that are tolerant of extreme soil conditions, including:
low calcium:magnesium ratio
lack of essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus and
high concentrations of the heavy metals (more common in ultramafic rocks)

These plants are commonly called serpentine endemics, if they grow only on these soils. (Serpentinite is composed of the mineral serpentine, but the two terms are often both used to mean the rock, not its mineral composition.)

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_soil accessed 14 Aug 2010

On serpentine rock and soil, Ingalls Lake trail, Kittitas County, Washington, USA

i090909 225

Tags

Photos / Sounds

Observer

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Date

August 29, 2009 01:14 PM PDT

Description

descending from Long's Pass, in serpentine soil, Kittitas County, Washington, USA

i090909 770