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What

red-breasted nuthatch Sitta canadensis

Observer

dreierj

Date

April 26, 2015

Photos / Sounds

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What

Hammond's flycatcher Empidonax hammondii

Observer

dreierj

Date

April 26, 2015

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

vine maple Acer circinatum

Observer

dreierj

Date

April 26, 2015

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

varied thrush Ixoreus naevius

Observer

dreierj

Date

April 26, 2015

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Brown Creeper Certhia americana

Observer

dreierj

Date

April 26, 2015

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

salal Gaultheria shallon

Observer

dreierj

Date

April 26, 2015

Photos / Sounds

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What

Saskatoon Amelanchier alnifolia

Observer

dreierj

Date

April 26, 2015

Photos / Sounds

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Observer

brewbooks

Date

June 2, 2013 02:44 PM PDT

Description

Seeking Saxifraga oppositifolia with Thamnolia vermicularis white wormy lichen in lower sections.

Ridge on the way to Welch Peak, Olympic National Forest.
about 1800 meters (5900 feet)
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Photos / Sounds

What

Gray Jay Perisoreus canadensis

Observer

wendy5

Date

February 2, 2015

Description

There were four Gray Jays at the summit of Mt. Walker today. They must be the same pair of adults I saw in the summer with two juveniles, and now all are adults. They grabbed a granola bar from the hand of a fellow hiker, and then two hikers fed them a few more bites by hand. The Gray Jay is known locally as a "camp robber."

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Observer

wendy5

Date

November 15, 2014

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Here are some branches of a Taxus brevifolia or Western Yew. Thanks to Fred Weinmann of the Native Plant Society for pointing it out to me. It was growing by/the Tunnel Creek Trail in the Buckhorn Wilderness.

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Observer

wendy5

Date

November 15, 2014

Description

Growing on this tree were half a dozen 1' wide clumps of Sparassis crispa or Cauliflower Mushroom. They were too high up to touch or smell. They were noticed on Tunnel Creek Trail in the Buckhorn Wilderness near the river with temps in the 20s.

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Observer

wendy5

Date

November 15, 2014

Description

Thanks to Sharon Schlentner of the Native Plant Society for pointing out Rhytidiopsis robusta or well-named Pipecleaner Moss, similar to Electrified Catstail Moss, but growing at a higher subalpine altitude.

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Observer

wendy5

Date

November 15, 2014

Description

Thanks to Fred Weinmann of the Native Plant Society for pointing out Gaultheria ovatifolia or Western Tea-berry, aka Slender Wintergreen, a relative of Salal. It was growing in a patch along Tunnel Creek Trail in the Buckhorn Wilderness.

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Observer

wendy5

Date

November 15, 2014

Description

I was excited to find my first two Cantharellus cibarius or Chanterelles along the Tunnel Creek Trail in the Buckhorn Wilderness. With temps in the 20s, they were both freeze-dried, and didn't look too appetizing, though they were a nice size, 4" tall.

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What

maidenhair ferns Genus Adiantum

Observer

wendy5

Date

November 15, 2014

Description

The Adiantum pedatum or Maidenhair Ferns along Tunnel Creek Trail in the Buckhorn Wilderness looked very wilted and curled as winter sets in and the temperatures were in the 20s.

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Photos / Sounds

What

Irregular Polypody Polypodium amorphum

Observer

brewbooks

Date

June 2, 2007 11:22 AM PDT

Description

Polypodium amorphum
Polypodiaceae family

Polypodium amorphum image at Washington Native Plant Society

Mount Townsend
about 1700 meters (5600 feet)
Buckhorn Wilderness, Olympic National Forest
Washington, USA

Seen on a North American Rock Garden Society (NARGS) Northwest Chapter field trip

i060107 025

Photos / Sounds

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What

green false hellebore Veratrum viride

Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

It's the end of the season on Mt. Townsend, and the Veratrum viride or Green False Hellebore has toppled over. Each stem is about 4' long. Only a few of those I saw had blossoms, and they were still upright. These were spotted at about 5000 or 5500'.

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Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

I was excited to find Thamnolia vermicularis, an arctic-subarctic lichen, growing on a sunny boulder covered in a variety of lichens and mosses at about 6000' on the slopes of Mt. Townsend. I've only seen this once before, on Mt. Zion.

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What

Smilacina stellata Maianthemum stellatum

Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

Here are the pretty berries of the Smilacina stellata or Star-flowered False Solomon’s-Seal. The flowers are also beautiful on this plant. This was found at about 5500' in a shady section of the mixed conifer forest along the slopes of Mt. Townsend.

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Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

This bracket fungus was among the prettiest I've seen! I forgot to look whether the trunk was from a live tree or a snag. Each shelf was about 5-10" wide, growing about 4" from the trunk. They were growing about 6' from the ground in a shady mixed conifer forest at about 5000'.

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Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

The Saxifraga bronchialis or Spotted Saxifrage had bloomed some time ago, and the scrubby low leaves are turning autumn colors. This plant was growing on a boulder at about 6000' along the Mt. Townsend trail.

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Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

The Peltigera neopolydactyla or Frog Pelt along the lower portion of the Mt. Townsend trail was completely gray.

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What

Chipmunks Genus Tamias

Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

I saw four Olympic Chipmunks along the trail to Mt. Townsend. This one was so intent on gathering a piece of dried grass that it tolerated my presence on the trail.

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Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

I spotted just two plants of Geum triflorum or Old Man’s Whiskers gone to seed along the sunny slope of Mt. Townsend, at about 5500'.

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Photos / Sounds

What

Cushion Buckwheat Eriogonum ovalifolium

Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

I am puzzled by these plants that were growing in patches at the summit of Mt. Townsend. Some patches of gray leaves had no flowers at all, and looked almost like flaky lichen. Others had a few composite flowers of pinkish-orangish color, probably past their prime. Could they be Antennaria microphylla or Rosy Pussytoes? The thin, straight 4"-5" stems didn't have leaves, and the photos I've seen of Antennaria microphylla show little leaves.

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What

Dense Spikemoss Selaginella densa

Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

This appears to be a Lycopodium or clubmoss, growing among other mosses and lichens on a sunny boulder at about 6000' on the slope of Mt. Townsend. The lanky stems were pointed down.

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What

Rocky Mountain Parnassian Parnassius smintheus

Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

This 1 1/2" cream-colored butterfly with black and white striped antennae and little gray dots was stunning! It was feeding on a Douglas' Aster at about 6000', completely oblivious to my presence.

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What

Arctic Lupine Lupinus arcticus

Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

Not many wildflowers still in bloom on Mt. Townsend, but there were a few Lupinus arcticus or Arctic Lupine flowers, looking kind of stunted.

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Photos / Sounds

Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

Here's Luina hypoleuca or Silverback Luina all gone to seed at the end of the season, near the summit to Mt. Townsend.

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What

common juniper Juniperus communis

Observer

wendy5

Date

September 17, 2014

Description

There was lots of Juniperus communis or Common Juniper growing low to the ground in the upper 1/3 of the Mt. Townsend trail, but I only found berries in a couple of locations. Where there were berries, there were many!

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