I am a devoted Christian, husband and father of three. I have always loved to identify and learn about local creatures, and have been spending recent years gardening with natives to "Bring Nature Home" (http://plantanative.com/). My schooling is in wildlife management from Penn State, and I have functioned primarily as a field biologist for the past 20 years. I am currently employed by a county park district in northeast Ohio as a conservation planner, performing various inventories to prioritize and restore natural areas.

Most of my experience is with terrestrial vertebrates and plants; however, I have wanted to tackle other taxa groups for years. Now with help from the iNaturalist community I have finally begun. I am most familiar with species from northeastern US and can tend to be a bit impulsive with my IDs. Feel free to correct me as appropriate.

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rcurtis's favorite taxa

Flowering Plants - Photo (c) Anne G, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-SA) CC
Flowering Plants Info
The flowering plants (angiosperms), also known as Angiospermae Lindl. or Magnoliophyta, are the most diverse group of land plants. Angiosperms are seed-producing plants like the gymnosperms and can be distinguished from the gymnosperms by a series of synapomorphies (derived characteristics). These characteristics include flowers, endosperm within the seeds, and the production of fruits that contain the seeds. Etymologically, angiosperm means a plant that produces seeds within an enclosure; they are fruiting plants, although more commonly referred... (From Wikipedia)
Amphibians - Photo (c) Matthew Niemi, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND) CC
Amphibians Info
Amphibians are ectothermic, tetrapod vertebrates of the class Amphibia (Greek ἀμφí, amphi, "both" + βíος, bios, "life"). They inhabit a wide variety of habitats with most species living within terrestrial, fossorial, arboreal or freshwater aquatic ecosystems. Amphibians typically start out as larva living in water, but some species have developed behavioural adaptations to bypass this. The young generally undergo metamorphosis from larva with gills to an adult air-breathing form with lungs. Amphibians use their skin as... (From Wikipedia)
Birds - Photo (c) Kenny P., some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) CC
Birds Info
Birds (class Aves or clade Avialae) are feathered, winged, two-legged, warm-blooded, egg-laying vertebrates. Aves ranks as the tetrapod class with the most living species, approximately ten thousand. Extant birds belong to the subclass Neornithes, living worldwide and ranging in size from the 5 cm (2 in) Bee Hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) Ostrich. The fossil record indicates that birds emerged within the theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic period, around 150 million years ago. Birds are the only living... (From Wikipedia)
Reptiles - Photo (c) Keven Law, some rights reserved (CC BY-SA) CC
Reptiles Info
Reptiles, the class Reptilia, are an evolutionary grade of animals, comprising today's turtles, crocodilians, snakes, lizards, and tuatara, as well as many extinct groups. A reptile is any amniote (a tetrapod whose egg has an additional membrane, originally to allow them to lay eggs on land) that is neither a mammal nor a bird. Unlike mammals, birds, and certain extinct reptiles, living reptiles have scales or scutes (rather than fur or feathers) and are cold-blooded. Advocates... (From Wikipedia)
Mammals - Photo (c) Andy, some rights reserved (CC BY-ND) CC
Mammals Info
Mammals (class Mammalia /məˈmeɪli.ə/) are a clade of endothermic amniotes. Among the features that distinguish them from the other amniotes, the reptiles and the birds, are hair, three middle ear bones, mammary glands in females, and a neocortex (a region of the brain). The mammalian brain regulates body temperature and the circulatory system, including the four-chambered heart. The mammals include the largest animals on the planet, the rorquals and some other whales, as well as some... (From Wikipedia)
rcurtis

aka Rob Curtis