Globally Endangered (EN) (Source: IUCN Red List)

Classification
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All Names

  • Scientific Names
    • Grus americana
  • Spanish
    • Grulla blanca
  • English
    • Whooping Crane
  • Aou 4 Letter Codes
    • WHCR
  • French
    • grue blanche

Guide Colors

     

Extras

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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

ehjalmarson

Date

May 9, 2015 10:27 AM CDT

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

dennislingnau

Date

October 21, 2016

Description

12 miles west of Vernon Texas. Wilbarger county. I send you a picture of the crane

Photos / Sounds

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

mako252

Date

November 26, 2016 12:04 PM CST

Place

Texas, US (Google, OSM)

Description

very rare Nueces county record

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

txherpbird

Date

November 22, 2016 11:00 AM CST

Place

Texas, US (Google, OSM)

Description

with Sandhill Cranes

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

cgeorg66

Date

the past

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Observed a lone whooping crane with a large flock of Sandhill Cranes feeding in a plowed field on County Road 435 between Thrall and Thorndale, Texas approximately 1 mile from the intersection of County Road 435 and U.S. 79. The sighting was at 5:34 p.m.

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

cgeorg66

Date

November 21, 2016

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Observed one adult whooping crane with a large flock of Sandhill Cranes on County Road 435 between Thrall and Thorndale Texas. They were feeding in a plowed corn field at 5:35 p.m.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

connorj

Date

November 15, 2016 11:28 AM CST

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

friel

Date

November 18, 2016 02:32 PM CST

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

jameshryan

Date

November 12, 2016

Place

Texas, US (Google, OSM)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

natureali

Date

August 10, 2013 12:02 PM PDT

Description

Necedah National Wildlife Refuge, WI
10 August 2013

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

sailorbjm

Date

November 13, 2016 09:55 AM CST

Place

Texas, US (Google, OSM)

Description

Pair and one juvenile

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

w_harrell

Date

November 12, 2016 09:28 AM CST

Place

Texas, US (Google, OSM)

Description

4 adults flying in a southwesterly direction at about 200 ft altitude. Heard a single call. Black on wingtips only. Extended legs and neck.

View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

The whooping crane (Grus americana), the tallest North American bird, is an endangered crane species named for its whooping sound. In 2003, there were about 153 pairs of whooping cranes. Along with the sandhill crane, it is one of only two crane species found in North America. The whooping crane's lifespan is estimated to be 22 to 24 years in the wild. After being pushed to the brink of extinction by unregulated hunting and loss of...

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Conservation Summary

  • Globally
    Endangered (EN) (Source: IUCN Red List)
    Critically imperiled (G1) (Source: NatureServe)
    Critically Imperiled. One self-sustaining population nests in Canada, winters primarily along the Texas coast; two additional reintroduced populations (one migrates Wisconsin-Florida, one nonmigratory in Florida); historically much more widespread; total wild population in 2006 was 338; with about 135 in captive flocks; numbers increasing; problems include habitat degradation, low productivity associated with drought, and mortality from collisions with powerlines along lengthy migratory route.
Source: BirdLife International (2011) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 31/07/2011.
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