Globally Endangered (EN) (Source: IUCN Red List)

Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • Scientific Names
    • Grus americana
  • Spanish
    • Grulla blanca
  • English
    • Whooping Crane
  • Aou 4 Letter Codes
    • WHCR
  • French
    • grue blanche

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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

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What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

timbir5

Date

December 31, 2004 10:43 PM EST

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

jokurtz

Date

January 4, 2013 03:29 AM HST

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

juddpatterson

Date

December 15, 2007 03:26 PM EST

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

martin-hall

Date

May 2, 2013 08:03 AM HST

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Had five Whooping Cranes stopped in at a wet area on the Base and stayed for 3 days. They were all banded and GPS radio equiped. These are some of the birds that were escorted by an ultra-lite plane on their migration.

Photos / Sounds

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What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

scottbuckel

Date

December 8, 2010 03:42 PM CST

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

These are from the first couple of trips to a ranch thati photographed for a contest. It started out very slowly getting used to the ranch and leanrning how to find animals on the ranch.

Photos / Sounds

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

wonder_al

Date

June 2, 2016 11:36 AM CDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Necedah National Wildlife Refuge, WI

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

birdnerdjosh

Date

February 26, 2016

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

mjskinner

Date

March 22, 2016 07:20 AM MST

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Bad pictures, but we could clearly see the bark face/head on the white body in a spotting scope.

Photos / Sounds

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

catabbott

Date

April 9, 2016

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

brentano

Date

May 4, 2016

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

My friend and i were heading home from a morning of birding when we spotted an egret way out in a field that just didn't look right. Stopped car for better look and knew it was too big for sure. He called it first. We got out and put scope on it for certain id. It was hanging out with a young sandhill crane, but no others of either species were seen in the area.
Observed for nearly an hour and were able to get several looks at bands on legs. Trying to see if way to determine whether a late off course bird from the migrating population or a roaming bird from the Louisiana group. Hoping for the former.
it was noon and heat shear from such a distance combined with steady wind made useable photos almost impossible. These are the best I could manage.

Photos / Sounds

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

anudibranchmom

Date

April 4, 2016 06:38 AM PDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whooping Crane Grus americana

Observer

sheliahargis

Date

April 10, 2016 02:25 PM CDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Heading north.

View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

The Whooping Crane (Grus americana), the tallest North American bird, is an endangered crane species named for its whooping sound. In 2003, there were about 153 pairs of whooping cranes. Along with the Sandhill Crane, it is one of only two crane species found in North America. The Whooping Crane's lifespan is estimated to be 22 to 24 years in the wild. After being pushed to the brink of extinction by unregulated hunting and loss of...

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Conservation Summary

  • Globally
    Endangered (EN) (Source: IUCN Red List)
    Critically imperiled (G1) (Source: NatureServe)
    Critically Imperiled. One self-sustaining population nests in Canada, winters primarily along the Texas coast; two additional reintroduced populations (one migrates Wisconsin-Florida, one nonmigratory in Florida); historically much more widespread; total wild population in 2006 was 338; with about 135 in captive flocks; numbers increasing; problems include habitat degradation, low productivity associated with drought, and mortality from collisions with powerlines along lengthy migratory route.
Source: BirdLife International (2011) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 31/07/2011.
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