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    • Chiroptera
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Creative Commons Flickr Photos Tagged "Chiroptera."
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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

15870920506_e28808584c_s

What

Bats Order Chiroptera

Observer

m_jon

Date

July 19, 2014 04:54 PM PDT

Description

Bats were coming to the outside light and feeding on insects. This is the only photo I managed to get. They're fast!

I've turned on "ID Please" but I accept that this may not be identifiable beyond "bat". I'll try to get better photos next time I'm visiting.

Photos / Sounds

What

Proboscis bat Rhynchonycteris naso

Observer

carmelo_lopez

Date

October 3, 2014

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Bats Order Chiroptera

Observer

sekisambu

Date

November 7, 2014

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

berylmakori

Date

November 15, 2014

Place

Watamu,Kilifi County, Kenya (Google, OSM)

Photos / Sounds

What

Straw-colored fruit bat Eidolon helvum

Observer

milletman

Date

November 6, 2014

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Part of the BCEAO-Niamey colony of Straw-Colored Fruit Bats (not identifiable in the attached photos, in which they are the dark blotches in the foliage of the ca. 6m-to-8m-tall trees inside the northern compound perimeter wall of the BCEAO office, located between Petit Marchais & the traffic circle connecting to Rue General DeGaulle) in central Niamey. These photos were taken between 17:48 & 17:52 pm on Thursday evening 6th November, while I was easing through heavy traffic (traveling from east-south-east to wast-north-west) on the way home from my office via Petit Marchais. Note how close the vehicles are to the bats' roosting site -- which consists of a ca. 150m-long J-shaped string of about 23 trees along the inside of the northern compound wall, continuing for another 12-15 trees going around the northwest corner & western boundaries of the bank compound north of the main entrance on the west side of the compound. Perhaps because of the 3m-high wall & armed security guards patrolling inside of the compound perimeter wall, the bats are relatively undisturbed in this mid-city chaos despite being almost low enough to touch.
I conducted a census of this colony several days later, at mid-day on 9th November (reported as a separate observation, no. 1064391) & estimated the population of this colony at 3400 individuals, with individual trees having from one individual bat (2 trees) to at least 250 individuals (also 2 trees). As the colony is in a curvilinear group of short trees, & is just one-tree wide by at most 200m long, observations on this colony are relatively easy to make so long as one does nothing to attract unwanted attention of the bank's security staff, or those of the national Treasury office located across the street.

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Yellow-winged bat Lavia frons

Observer

jakob

Date

February 9, 2009

Place

Nafégué (Google, OSM)

Description

Couple roosting in trees of dense gallery forest

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Davy's naked-backed bat Pteronotus davyi

Observer

trinibats

Date

March 19, 2012

Description

The Davy's Naked-backed Bat (Pteronotus davyi). This species eats moths, flies, and other flying insects. It roosts in the darkest and most humid sections of Trinidad's deepest caves. Photo: Dick Wilkins (Trinibats)

Photos / Sounds

What

Epauletted Fruit Bats Genus Epomophorus

Observer

anncna

Date

October 5, 2014

Description

Lieber Jakob,
hier kommt wie versprochen Baby Casper :)

05/10/-27/10/: the two were here every day.

When I returned from leave they were still here.

07/11/-10/11/: the two were here every day.

11/11/: no sign of them, but we had bad weather the night before (I think they found shelter somewhere else, because the following day they were back again)

12/11/-16/11: the two were here every day.

17/11/-18/11/: no sign of them (again bad weather...)

19/11/-22/11/: the two were here every day.

The Baby is growing nicely & I will still follow up on them!

Cheers Anna

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

Observer

ctnash

Date

January 22, 1981 07:50 PM AEST

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Observed at Jersey Zoo.

Tags

Zoo

Photos / Sounds

Observer

carrieseltzer

Date

May 31, 2008 12:06 PM EDT

Description

Seeds and fruit discarded at a feeding roost in an unused building. Second photo shows the room it was in.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Vesper Bats Family Vespertilionidae

Observer

nick22

Date

November 15, 2014

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Miotis mexicano Myotis velifer

Observer

gonzalezii

Date

June 15, 2014
View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

Bats are mammals of the order Chiroptera (/kaɪˈrɒptərə/; from the Greek χείρ - cheir, "hand" and πτερόν - pteron, "wing") whose forelimbs form webbed wings, making them the only mammals naturally capable of true and sustained flight. By contrast, other mammals said to fly, such as flying squirrels, gliding possums, and colugos, can only glide for short distances. Bats do not flap their entire forelimbs, as birds do, but instead flap their spread-out digits, which are...

No range data available.