Classification
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All Names

  • English
    • Cnidarians
  • Scientific Names
    • Cnidaria
  • Spanish
    • Corales, medusas y parientes

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Creative Commons Flickr Photos Tagged "Cnidaria."
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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Observer

fmoretzsohn

Date

March 3, 2011

Description

A number of Cannonball or Cabbage Jellyfish, Stomolophus meleagris, were observed at University Beach, Corpus Christi Bay, Texas.

The largest ones were about 20-25 cm in length. They all appeared to be white, with no signs of colors, as some photos indicate (e.g., on Wikipedia).

I see this species sometimes at this beach, but not as many as I saw that day, probably over 10 in this small beach. There were also many Combjellies (see separate record). They were probably brought in by the wind/waves.

See more about this species at the Biodiversity of the Gulf of Mexico (BioGoMx) database at:
http://gulfbase.org/biogomx/biospecies.php?species=Spp-18-0033

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

fmoretzsohn

Date

August 5, 1992

Place

Palau (Google, OSM)

Description

Close-up of the beautiful carnation soft coral, probably in the family Nephtheidae, observed during a night dive in Palau, summer of 1992.

This photo was taken with a Nikonos V camera with 80 mm lens a close-up kit frame, so the photo shows about 80 mm of field of view (width).

The watermark on the photo was when I uploaded this photo to the now defunct LighBox website. I don't remember the exact date of the observation.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Tubastrea coccinea Tubastraea coccinea

Observer

fmoretzsohn

Date

August 5, 1992

Place

Palau (Google, OSM)

Description

The beautiful and photogenic Orange Cup Coral, Tubastrea coccinea. It was observed during a dive in Palau in the summer of 1992.

It is native to the Indo-Pacific region but it has become an invasive species in the Atlantic, where it competes for space and food (plankton) with native corals.

The watermark on the photo refers to the date I posted the photo at the now defunct website LightBox, not the actual observation. I do not remember the exact date and place of the observation, sorry.

Photos / Sounds

What

Pacific Sea Nettle Chrysaora fuscescens

Observer

dpom

Date

September 18, 2014 10:05 AM PDT

Description

Dead

Photos / Sounds

Observer

fmoretzsohn

Date

July 24, 2008

Description

After Hurricane Dolly made landfall on South Padre Island, I went to Padre Island and Mustang Island to look for any critters that were brought by the hurricane. Among the findings were hundreds of Blue Button, Porpita porpita. I collected a few on the beach that were already dying or dead and losing their beautiful blue color. I took some photos of them under the microscope. Here are some of the better ones. In one of them you can see some microscopic strands sticking out of one of the tentacles. I wonder if they are nematocysts or perhaps hydroids? The photos shown here were taken under a microscope in a lab in Corpus Christi; the map shows the location where the specimens where collected.

See more about Porpita at the Biodiversity of the Gulf of Mexico (BioGoMx) database at: http://gulfbase.org/biogomx/biospecies.php?species=Spp-19-0054

Photos / Sounds

Observer

fmoretzsohn

Date

April 24, 2014

Description

Yellow sea whips often wash ashore on Padre and Mustang Island. They are single strands (i.e., unbranched), and measure between 50 cm to perhaps up to one meter. The base is often anchored on a small rock or shell. The most common color is bright yellow, but sometimes orange or purple strands are found. Each strand was hundreds of small polyps that open up when the sea whip is covered in water. Sometimes, perhaps one in every twenty sea whips you can find a small gastropod that lives on the sea whip, Simnialena marferula. The gastropod is an ectoparasite and feeds on the sea whip and acquires the same pigmentation for perfect camouflage. However, no snails were found today (I did not look for them). One of the photos shows a mass of sea whips entangled with Sargassum seaweed.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Brooding Anemone Epiactis prolifera

Observer

anudibranchmom

Date

September 17, 2014 11:38 AM PDT

Description

Attached to ulva; note "children" near its base. Small, about 1/2". Not sure of this ID because of stalk/tentacle color and location.

Photos / Sounds

What

Orange-Striped Green Sea Anemone Diadumene lineata

Observer

anudibranchmom

Date

September 17, 2014 11:49 AM PDT

Description

If you blow this up to original, you can see the green stalks with orange stripes in the middle of this photo (yes I made them pull in their tentacles). The second photo shows their normal posture.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

anudibranchmom

Date

September 17, 2014 11:31 AM PDT

Description

Red bushy clustering hydroid, colony about 5" across. Small reddish polyps visible on many branches.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Orange-Striped Green Sea Anemone Diadumene lineata

Observer

dpom

Date

September 16, 2014

Photos / Sounds

What

Anemones Order Actiniaria

Observer

dpom

Date

September 16, 2014

Description

varying in color from grayish white to tan. Small about an inch across and an inch high

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Sea Anemones Order Actiniaria

Observer

dpom

Date

September 16, 2014

Description

tiny, about an inch in diameter and a little taller than an inch.

View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

Cnidaria (/naɪˈdɛəriə/ with a silent c) is a phylum containing over 10,000species of animals found exclusively in aquatic and mostly marine environments. Their distinguishing feature is cnidocytes, specialized cells that they use mainly for capturing prey. Their bodies consist of mesoglea, a non-living jelly-like substance, sandwiched between two layers of epithelium that are mostly one cell thick. They have two basic body forms: swimming medusae and sessile polyps, both of which are radially symmetrical with mouths...

No range data available.