Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • Portuguese
    • Picnogonídeos
    • Aranhas-do-mar
  • Scientific Names
    • Pycnogonida
  • English
    • Sea Spiders
  • Russian
    • Морские пауки
    • Многоколенчатые
  • Belarusian
    • Марскія павукі
  • Spanish
    • Arañas de mar
  • Chinese (Traditional)
    • 海蛛綱(堅殖腺綱)
  • Japanese
    • ウミグモ綱

Extras

Taxonomic changes »

Taxon schemes »

Make taxonomic Flickr tags for this taxon »

Invite photos from other sites »

Wikipedia taxobox »

Search descendant taxa »

Embed a widget for this taxon on your website »

108057468 b9aac01ed2 s Square Square Square Square Square 81757 98 68 67984 98 68 81757 98 68 Square Square Square 108057490 c2421df49f s 108057513 ff286d144f s 108057490 c2421df49f s 108057490 c2421df49f s 75px ascorhynchus japonicus 75px ascorhynchus japonicus
Creative Commons Flickr Photos Tagged "Pycnogonida."

Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Stearns' Sea Spider Pycnogonum stearnsi

Observer

kestrel

Date

January 13, 2017 04:56 PM PST

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

bexlloyd

Date

December 31, 2016 09:56 PM AEDT

Description

Male with eggs

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Sea Spiders Class Pycnogonida

Observer

ralfmagee

Date

December 12, 2012 08:28 AM AEDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

ralfmagee

Date

March 27, 2002 01:03 PM +11

Description

David Staples Museum Victoria

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

ralfmagee

Date

October 10, 2011 12:46 PM AEDT

Description

101011 Stylopallene cheilorhynchus This species shares markings & colouring with S. Longicauda and it is really hard to separate the two in a
photograph. Given the location of your specimens I think it more likely to be S. cheilorhynchus but I will need a specimen to confirm
this for you. Usually both species are associated with the bryozoan Amathia spp. more so than the Scuticellid on which they are
photographed. Great observation of the gastropod on the egg mass. It is not uncommon for gastropods to lay eggs on very large
deep-sea pycnogonids but nothing like this has been recorded. For the time being I am inclined to treat this as opportunistic feeding (if
that is what it is doing) rather than parasitic, but who knows? It would be nice to see what damage has been done to the eggs. This is
something else to be on the look-out for. Well done
David Staples Museum Victoria

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

ralfmagee

Date

September 13, 2014 11:26 AM AEST

Description

Hi Ian.
Fabulous photo!
The specimen is Pallenopsis macneilli Clark, 1963. The type locality is Nelson’s Bay NSW but it is widely-spread along the s-e coast, southern coastline and Tas.
I have it most often recorded from around the base of brown algae but I know exactly what its host substrate is. If you ever get the chance to photograph it in situ I would love to see it.
It is always terrific to see these images. If nothing else it helps to plot the distribution of species.
Good wishes and thanks for allowing me to see your photo ~David

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

ralfmagee

Date

April 24, 2014 12:13 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Stearns' Sea Spider Pycnogonum stearnsi

Observer

cscarborough17

Date

December 13, 2016 04:01 PM PST

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Stearns' Sea Spider Pycnogonum stearnsi

Observer

kestrel

Date

November 16, 2016 03:49 PM PST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

chiefredearth

Date

September 5, 2016 03:28 PM IDT

Description

A Lollipop like fungus, stem smooth and white in color and the cap is closed and looks like a stinkhorn. From the Valley of Flowers.

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

anudibranchmom

Date

November 3, 2016 05:41 AM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Sea Spiders Class Pycnogonida

Observer

anudibranchmom

Date

September 15, 2016 12:43 PM PDT

Description

Two, both with eggs.

View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

Sea spiders, also called Pantopoda or pycnogonids, are marine arthropods of class Pycnogonida. They are cosmopolitan, found especially in the Mediterranean and Caribbean Seas, as well as the Arctic and Antarctic Oceans. There are over 1300 known species, ranging in size from 1 to 10 millimetres (0.039 to 0.39 in) to over 90 cm (35 in) in some deep water species. Most are toward the smaller end of this range in relatively shallow depths, however, they can grow to...

No range data available.
Member of the iNaturalist Network   |   Powered by iNaturalist open source software