Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • Scientific Names
    • Thuja plicata
  • English
    • Western redcedar
    • western red cedar
    • canoe cedar

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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Observer

trelam

Date

October 23, 2014 08:05 AM PDT

Description

A conifer tree that is visibly shorter than Douglas-fir, and its Abies cousins. A lovely, sweet smelling tree with reddish bark that exfoliates in thin, hair-like strands. Its reddish twigs grow off the branches in a downward direction, making the tree look a bit droopy, like a wet dog. A key identifier of this species is the shape of the bloom on the undersides of the leaves, it makes two rows that look like "butterflies".

Habitat: Growing in partial shade next to Douglas-fir and western hemlock in a preserved garden on The Evergreen State College campus next to parking lot C.

Weather: Rainy, 55F, and with full overcast sky.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Western Red Cedar Thuja plicata

Observer

cmmaylor

Date

October 19, 2014 04:00 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Western redcedar Thuja plicata

Observer

irenemoore

Date

October 20, 2014

Description

Resting nearby a raging river just outside Lake Cushman, was this Western redcedar, or Thuja plicata, of the family Cupressaceae. Some defining characteristics of this native plant are scaley needles, small reproductive cones, and red fibrous bark.

This tree should not be confused with true cedars of the family Cedrus. The fall view of this evergreen tree shows it sits by neighboring firs and hemlocks. Lichens and moss cling to its bark, absorbing all of the moisture-rich air.

Photos / Sounds

What

Western redcedar Thuja plicata

Observer

klynne

Date

October 19, 2014 02:31 PM PDT

Description

Thuja plicata, or western red cedar, this specimen is tall with characteristic scale-like needles, red bark, and a profusion of small woody seed cones.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Western redcedar Thuja plicata

Observer

lilfae

Date

October 18, 2014 04:50 PM PDT

Description

Along the creek in dense shade

Photos / Sounds

What

Western redcedar Thuja plicata

Observer

marvelliott

Date

August 13, 2014

Photos / Sounds

What

Western Red Cedar Thuja plicata

Observer

donny2341

Date

October 10, 2014

Description

Observed in the Evergreen Forest near the Evergreen State College campus. Identifying characteristics of this tree include the large branches that droop slightly before curving upward into a ā€˜Jā€™ shape. The bark has grey outer coloring that transitions to reddish brown color on the inside. Bark commonly known for peeling off in long fibrous strips off the trunk.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

suemcgaw

Date

July 2, 2014

Place

Rangiora (Google, OSM)

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

suemcgaw

Date

May 5, 2014

Description

Thuja plicata 'Stoneham Gold'

Photos / Sounds

Observer

guisauco

Date

October 12, 2014 03:50 PM CEST

Description

Not native, planted in a garden.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

palmeg28

Date

October 10, 2014 03:41 PM PDT

Description

About 3.5 feet wide, lower branches covered in moss.

Photos / Sounds

What

Western RedCedar Thuja plicata

Observer

sheridanj47

Date

October 9, 2014

Description

Bark was purple, and red-ish when pealed. Bark also peeled in fiber type vertical strands. Branches fairly long (~2-3m) and were in a type of a 'J' shape covered in Lichens.

View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

Thuja plicata, commonly called Western or Pacific redcedar,giant or western arborvitae,giant cedar, or shinglewood, is a species of Thuja, an evergreen coniferous tree in the cypress family Cupressaceae native to western North America. Despite its common names, it does not belong with the true cedars within the genus Cedrus. It is the Provincial tree of British Columbia, and has extensive applications for the indigenous First Nations of the Pacific Northwest.

No range data available.