Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • German
    • Sibirischer Goldregenpfeifer
  • Scientific Names
    • Pluvialis fulva
  • Spanish
    • Chorlo fulvo
  • English
    • Pacific Golden-Plover
    • Pacific Golden Plover
  • Hawaiian
    • Kolea
    • Kōlea
  • Aou 4 Letter Codes
    • PAGP
  • Portuguese
    • Tarambola-dourada-siberiana
  • French
    • Pluvier fauve

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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva

Observer

vireolanius

Date

April 30, 2016 04:44 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva

Observer

tavita_togia2016

Date

May 18, 2016

Description

During the northern summer, the Tuli (Pluvialis fulva) or Golden Plover nests in Alaska and northern Canada. But when the northern days grow shorter and colder, the birds migrate to Polynesia for the greatest of all animal journeys. From gathering places on the coasts of Alaska, the tuli take off to fly non-stop over 3,000 miles of open-ocean to the Hawaiian Islands. These birds cannot land on the water and take a rest―their feathers are not waterproof, so if they land in the water, they drown. After a well-earned rest in Hawaii, the tuli take off again for another flight over thousands of miles of ocean to reach the Samoan Archipelago. These birds arrive in September and then return north in April.

The Pacific Golden Plover can reach a height of 23 cm and is often seen on the beaches, but even more commonly can be found searching for food on the short grass of the village malae, parks, the golf course, and the airport. It feeds on insects, crustaceans, and worms. Although this plover is plain brown during most of its stay in American Samoa, it gets a beautiful new set of feathers just before it heads north: a golden-spangled back and jet black underparts. During flight, it is fast and direct with strong regular wingbeats. And it can also be identified by its two or three-syllable whistle, with emphasis on the last note to-lee; usually given singly or twice, either at rest or on rising.

Reference:
Watling, Dick and Kelly, Chloe Talbot. 2001. A Guide to the Birds of Fiji & Western Polynesia. Environmental Consultants (Fiji) Ltd. Fiji.

Photos / Sounds

What

Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva

Observer

mikepatterson

Date

April 25, 2016 01:10 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva

Observer

davidr

Date

April 18, 2016 12:42 AM HST

Photos / Sounds

What

Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva

Observer

maryljameson

Date

April 4, 2016 08:11 AM HST

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva

Observer

bbunny

Date

March 23, 2016 10:33 AM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva

Observer

bbunny

Date

March 22, 2016 07:58 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva

Observer

vicfazio3

Date

March 24, 2016

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva

Observer

ncisgoth

Date

December 18, 2011 12:55 PM HST

Place

waioloa (Google, OSM)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva

Observer

vicfazio3

Date

March 21, 2016

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva

Observer

vicfazio3

Date

March 17, 2016

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva

Observer

anudibranchmom

Date

February 27, 2016 11:42 AM PST

Tags

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Description from Wikipedia

The Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva) is a medium-sized plover.

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Conservation Summary

    Source: BirdLife International (2011) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 31/07/2011.
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