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  • Scientific Names
    • Polystichum lemmonii
  • English
    • Lemmon's holly fern

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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

What

Lemmon's holly fern Polystichum lemmonii

Observer

brewbooks

Date

September 8, 2013 01:49 PM PDT

Description

Polystichum lemmonii Shasta Fern on Serpentine

Map of area

s20130909 465

Photos / Sounds

Observer

brewbooks

Date

July 19, 2008 11:18 AM PDT

Description

Polystichum lemmonii the signature fern for serpentine soil

Arthur Kruckeberg: "Of the western ferns on serpentine, only Polystichum lemmonii is obligate,"
Source Hardy Fern Library

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

A serpentine soil is derived from ultramafic rocks, in particular serpentinite, a rock formed by the hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle.
The soils derived from ultramafic bedrock give rise to unusual and sparse associations of edaphic (and often endemic) plants that are tolerant of extreme soil conditions, including:
low calcium:magnesium ratio
lack of essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus and
high concentrations of the heavy metals (more common in ultramafic rocks)

These plants are commonly called serpentine endemics, if they grow only on these soils. (Serpentinite is composed of the mineral serpentine, but the two terms are often both used to mean the rock, not its mineral composition.)

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_soil accessed 14 Aug 2010

Esmerelda Basin
Teanaway, Kittitas Co. Washington, USA
On serpentine rock and soil
i071908 067

Photos / Sounds

3978882020_db7b6971e0_s

What

Lemmon's holly fern Polystichum lemmonii

Observer

brewbooks

Date

August 8, 2009 12:19 PM PDT

Description

Although I wonder if this might be Polystichum kruckebergii; Kruckeberg's Sword Fern ???

Polystichum lemmonii the signature fern for serpentine soil

Arthur Kruckeberg: "Of the western ferns on serpentine, only Polystichum lemmonii is obligate,"
Source Hardy Fern Library

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

A serpentine soil is derived from ultramafic rocks, in particular serpentinite, a rock formed by the hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle.
The soils derived from ultramafic bedrock give rise to unusual and sparse associations of edaphic (and often endemic) plants that are tolerant of extreme soil conditions, including:
low calcium:magnesium ratio
lack of essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus and
high concentrations of the heavy metals (more common in ultramafic rocks)

These plants are commonly called serpentine endemics, if they grow only on these soils. (Serpentinite is composed of the mineral serpentine, but the two terms are often both used to mean the rock, not its mineral composition.)

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_soil accessed 14 Aug 2010

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

Ingalls Lake trail, Teanaway, Kittitas County, Washington, USA
next to a large serpentine rock
My other Shasta Fern photos

i090909 280

Tags

Photos / Sounds

3975335181_bf9d3548b5_s

What

Lemmon's holly fern Polystichum lemmonii

Observer

brewbooks

Date

August 8, 2009 10:29 AM PDT

Description

Polystichum lemmonii the signature fern for serpentine soil growing with Castilleja elmeri

Arthur Kruckeberg: "Of the western ferns on serpentine, only Polystichum lemmonii is obligate,"
Source Hardy Fern Library

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

A serpentine soil is derived from ultramafic rocks, in particular serpentinite, a rock formed by the hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle.
The soils derived from ultramafic bedrock give rise to unusual and sparse associations of edaphic (and often endemic) plants that are tolerant of extreme soil conditions, including:
low calcium:magnesium ratio
lack of essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus and
high concentrations of the heavy metals (more common in ultramafic rocks)

These plants are commonly called serpentine endemics, if they grow only on these soils. (Serpentinite is composed of the mineral serpentine, but the two terms are often both used to mean the rock, not its mineral composition.)

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_soil accessed 14 Aug 2010

On serpentine rock and soil, Ingalls Lake trail, Kittitas County, Washington, USA

i090909 228

Photos / Sounds

What

Lemmon's holly fern Polystichum lemmonii

Observer

brewbooks

Date

August 8, 2009 10:12 AM PDT

Description

Polystichum lemmonii the signature fern for serpentine soil

Arthur Kruckeberg: "Of the western ferns on serpentine, only Polystichum lemmonii is obligate,"
Source Hardy Fern Library

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

A serpentine soil is derived from ultramafic rocks, in particular serpentinite, a rock formed by the hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle.
The soils derived from ultramafic bedrock give rise to unusual and sparse associations of edaphic (and often endemic) plants that are tolerant of extreme soil conditions, including:
low calcium:magnesium ratio
lack of essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus and
high concentrations of the heavy metals (more common in ultramafic rocks)

These plants are commonly called serpentine endemics, if they grow only on these soils. (Serpentinite is composed of the mineral serpentine, but the two terms are often both used to mean the rock, not its mineral composition.)

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_soil accessed 14 Aug 2010

On serpentine rock and soil, Ingalls Lake trail, Kittitas County, Washington, USA

i090909 225

Tags

Photos / Sounds

What

Lemmon's holly fern Polystichum lemmonii

Observer

brewbooks

Date

August 29, 2009 12:53 PM PDT

Description

Polystichum lemmonii the signature fern for serpentine soil

Arthur Kruckeberg: "Of the western ferns on serpentine, only Polystichum lemmonii is obligate,"
Source Hardy Fern Library

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

A serpentine soil is derived from ultramafic rocks, in particular serpentinite, a rock formed by the hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle.
The soils derived from ultramafic bedrock give rise to unusual and sparse associations of edaphic (and often endemic) plants that are tolerant of extreme soil conditions, including:
low calcium:magnesium ratio
lack of essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus and
high concentrations of the heavy metals (more common in ultramafic rocks)

These plants are commonly called serpentine endemics, if they grow only on these soils. (Serpentinite is composed of the mineral serpentine, but the two terms are often both used to mean the rock, not its mineral composition.)

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_soil accessed 14 Aug 2010

descending from Long's Pass, in serpentine soil, Kittitas County, Washington, USA

i090909 766

Photos / Sounds

4890258899_e0650e33e4_s

What

Lemmon's holly fern Polystichum lemmonii

Observer

brewbooks

Date

July 31, 2010 01:11 PM PDT

Description

Polystichum lemmonii the signature fern for serpentine soil

Arthur Kruckeberg: "Of the western ferns on serpentine, only Polystichum lemmonii is obligate,"
Source Hardy Fern Library

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

A serpentine soil is derived from ultramafic rocks, in particular serpentinite, a rock formed by the hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle.
The soils derived from ultramafic bedrock give rise to unusual and sparse associations of edaphic (and often endemic) plants that are tolerant of extreme soil conditions, including:
low calcium:magnesium ratio
lack of essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus and
high concentrations of the heavy metals (more common in ultramafic rocks)

These plants are commonly called serpentine endemics, if they grow only on these soils. (Serpentinite is composed of the mineral serpentine, but the two terms are often both used to mean the rock, not its mineral composition.)

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_soil accessed 14 Aug 2010

Trail 1226.2 Pass to Lake Ann above Esmerelda Basin
Teanaway, Kittitas Co. Washington, USA
On serpentine rock and soil 1900 meters 6200 feet
30 July 2010

s100730 064

Photos / Sounds

What

Lemmon's holly fern Polystichum lemmonii

Observer

brewbooks

Date

June 23, 2007 10:29 AM PDT

Description

Polystichum lemmonii the signature fern for serpentine soil

Arthur Kruckeberg: "Of the western ferns on serpentine, only Polystichum lemmonii is obligate,"
Source Hardy Fern Library

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

A serpentine soil is derived from ultramafic rocks, in particular serpentinite, a rock formed by the hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle.
The soils derived from ultramafic bedrock give rise to unusual and sparse associations of edaphic (and often endemic) plants that are tolerant of extreme soil conditions, including:
low calcium:magnesium ratio
lack of essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus and
high concentrations of the heavy metals (more common in ultramafic rocks)

These plants are commonly called serpentine endemics, if they grow only on these soils. (Serpentinite is composed of the mineral serpentine, but the two terms are often both used to mean the rock, not its mineral composition.)

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_soil accessed 14 Aug 2010
Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

Stafford Creek trail 1359, Teanaway, Kittitas County, Washington, USA
next to a large serpentine rock
My other Shasta Fern photos
i062307 007

Photos / Sounds

What

Lemmon's holly fern Polystichum lemmonii

Observer

brewbooks

Date

July 30, 2011 12:09 PM PDT

Description

Polystichum lemmonii the signature fern for serpentine soil

Arthur Kruckeberg: "Of the western ferns on serpentine, only Polystichum lemmonii is obligate,"
Source Hardy Fern Library

Dryopteridaceae
Fern
Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern

A serpentine soil is derived from ultramafic rocks, in particular serpentinite, a rock formed by the hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle.
The soils derived from ultramafic bedrock give rise to unusual and sparse associations of edaphic (and often endemic) plants that are tolerant of extreme soil conditions, including:
low calcium:magnesium ratio
lack of essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus and
high concentrations of the heavy metals (more common in ultramafic rocks)

These plants are commonly called serpentine endemics, if they grow only on these soils. (Serpentinite is composed of the mineral serpentine, but the two terms are often both used to mean the rock, not its mineral composition.)

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_soil accessed 14 Aug 2010

On serpentine rock and soil
Beverly Turnpike on the way up to Iron Peak, Teanaway
Kittitas County Washington USA

031

Tags

Photos / Sounds

What

Lemmon's holly fern Polystichum lemmonii

Observer

brewbooks

Date

June 30, 2012 12:06 PM PDT

Description

Polystichum lemmonii is my favorite fern, and I spent some time looking at it on this field trip.

Polystichum lemmonii the signature fern for serpentine soil

Arthur Kruckeberg: "Of the western ferns on serpentine, only Polystichum lemmonii is obligate,"
Source Hardy Fern Library

Dryopteridaceae family (Lemmon's holly-fern, Shasta fern)

A serpentine soil is derived from ultramafic rocks, in particular serpentinite, a rock formed by the hydration and metamorphic transformation of ultramafic rock from the Earth's mantle.
The soils derived from ultramafic bedrock give rise to unusual and sparse associations of edaphic (and often endemic) plants that are tolerant of extreme soil conditions, including:
low calcium:magnesium ratio, lack of essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus and high concentrations of the heavy metals (more common in ultramafic rocks)

These plants are commonly called serpentine endemics, if they grow only on these soils. (Serpentinite is composed of the mineral serpentine, but the two terms are often both used to mean the rock, not its mineral composition.)
Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_soil accessed 14 Aug 2010

Bean Creek Trail 1391.1, 1340 meters, 4400 feet, Teanaway, Kittitas County, Washington

My other Polystichum lemmonii (Shasta Fern) photos

Northwestern Chapter of North American Rock Garden Society (NARGS) field trip on 30 June 2012

325

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Description from Wikipedia

Polystichum lemmonii is a species of fern known by the common names Lemmon's holly fern and Shasta fern. It is native to western North America from the Sierra Nevada of California north to Washington. It is also known from British Columbia, where there is a single occurrence in the mountains above the Okanagan Valley.

No range data available.