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    • Glycera

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Creative Commons Flickr Photos Tagged "Glycera."
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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

nudibranchmom

Date

April 3, 2014 09:34 AM PDT

Description

About 1.5".

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

Date

March 28, 2014

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

robberfly

Date

February 27, 2014 04:37 PM PST

Description

Alison Young called this...

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

taj

Date

February 1, 2014 03:36 PM PST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

kueda

Date

February 1, 2014 06:30 PM PST

Description

Not the best pics, but a cool worm. Under a rock high in the intertidal, outer coast. In a mucus tube in sand. Had internal feedings bits it could exsert, but I didn't see any jaws. ~ 12 cm long.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Genus Glycera Genus Glycera

Observer

tiwane

Date

February 1, 2014 03:27 PM PST

Photos / Sounds

7405650200_713eaff908_s

What

Genus Glycera Genus Glycera

Date

June 7, 2012 10:13 AM PDT

Description

C. Piotrowski, C. Dixon, S. Ellsworth, N. West, M.E. Hannibal

Photos / Sounds

5329461354_4d76db7834_s

Observer

loarie

Date

December 31, 2010

Description

A fisherman was slurping these "pile worms" out of the sand with a PBC suction deal along with the ghost shrimp to use for bait. He claims if you try to pick them up these crazy jaws come out and bite you!

View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

The genus Glycera is a group of polychaetes (bristle worms) commonly known as blood worms. They are typically found on the bottom of shallow marine waters, and some species (e.g. the common blood worm, Glycera dibranchiata), are extensively harvested along the Northeastern coast of the United States for use as bait in fishing. Another common species is the tufted gilled bloodworm, G. americana.

No range data available.