Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • Catalan
    • Peix gat americà
  • Scientific Names
    • Ictalurus punctatus
  • English
    • Channel Catfish
    • Channel Cat
  • Spanish
    • bagre de canal

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Extras

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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus

Observer

roxanne10

Date

January 11, 2017 06:26 PM PST

Photos / Sounds

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What

Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus

Observer

fishesoftexas

Date

October 22, 2016 01:06 PM CDT

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What

Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus

Observer

fishesoftexas

Date

October 22, 2016 12:01 PM CDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus

Observer

fishesoftexas

Date

October 22, 2016 09:42 AM CDT

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What

Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus

Observer

fishesoftexas

Date

October 20, 2016 02:41 PM CDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus

Observer

aguilita

Date

December 24, 2016

Description

Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

24 December 2016
El Rio Grande Supermarket
E. Berry & I-35W
Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas

Stopped at El Rio Grande Supermarket in Fort Worth (near the corner of E. Berry and I-35W) and found these live fish for sale. These fish are Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). According to the worker attending the fish portion of the meat department, these fish had arrived earlier that day. When asked in Spanish whether the fish are fed after they arrive and are placed in the tank, she responded, “No.” She added: “They are kept alive for four days and are not fed during that time. At the end of that period, we process them, clean them and put them up for sale. The fish are more expensive once they’ve been cleaned than if bought live.” According to the note accompanying the notice of jobs in the aquaculture industry found at Job Monkey: “Catfish is the most commonly produced aquatic species in the United States, with primary production located in the southern states of Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi along the Mississippi River and Gulf of Mexico. The primary subspecies is the channel catfish, due to its high spawning efficiency and high survival rates.”—Job Monkey: http://www.jobmonkey.com/aquaculturejobs/common-aquaculture-species/

See the related companion observation: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/4868784

Photos / Sounds

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What

Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus

Observer

sea-kangaroo

Date

December 28, 2016 05:03 PM MST

Description

Just got a quick shot before they unhooked and threw it back.

Tags

Photos / Sounds

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What

Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus

Observer

ekmoody

Date

June 20, 2010 10:36 PM MDT

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What

Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus

Observer

fishesoftexas

Date

October 21, 2016 12:00 PM CDT

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What

Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus

Observer

tcurtis

Date

July 5, 2014 11:40 AM EDT

Photos / Sounds

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What

Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus

Observer

saxzimbog

Date

April 29, 2016 10:48 AM CDT

Description

Photo by Clinton Nienhaus

Photos / Sounds

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What

Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus

Observer

belyykit

Date

November 23, 2011 09:39 AM EST

Description

Anhinga and channel catfish_20111123

View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, is North America's most numerous catfish species. It is the official fish of Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, and Tennessee, and is informally referred to as a "channel cat". In the United States, they are the most fished catfish species with approximately 8 million anglers targeting them per year. The popularity of channel catfish for food has contributed to the rapid growth of aquaculture of this species in the United States.

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Conservation Summary

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