Photos / Sounds

What

Roughleaf Conebush Leucadendron modestum

Observer

tonyrebelo

Date

September 21, 2011

Description

Roughleaf Conebush


Like the other two species (one with two subspecies) this Clay Conebush has scabrid (gritty) leaves. All the other species with flat winged seeds (Sunshine Conebushes) that grow on sandstone and sand or limestone have smooth leaves.

Photos / Sounds

What

Papuan Frogmouth Podargus papuensis

Observer

davidgwhite

Date

August 8, 2018 12:05 AM UTC

Description

The first time I had ever seen this, i videoed the entire event as well from entry to exit. It was as if this species swims all the time. I sent it to a frogmouth expert and she had never seen that before. The bird chose to swim and flew away very easily after its swim. There appeared to be no explanation for the bird swimming as it was not particularly hot or anything unusual.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Worcester Ribbon Pincushion Leucospermum tottum var. glabrum

Observer

botaneek

Date

November 10, 2019 10:19 AM SAST

Description

single plant in old veld; reseeder

Photos / Sounds

Observer

tonyrebelo

Date

November 3, 2019 12:32 PM SAST

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

malthinus

Date

October 7, 2016 09:23 AM SAST

Photos / Sounds

What

Sawedge Sugarbush Protea holosericea

Observer

muisvoel

Date

October 6, 2019 07:58 AM SAST

Description

We've never had to work this hard for a Protea! Brutal ascent to Rabiesberg, only one plant and no flowers in their prime! Next time it will have to be Saw-Edge, @wernert95 and @muonmo :)

We would have explored and looked for more, but time and water was limited. A handful of dead plants in the general vicinity of this one, which I'll post as a separate obs .A couple of flowerheads and seeds strewn around (guessing baboons).

Photos / Sounds

Observer

chris_whitehouse

Date

January 9, 2019 03:02 PM SAST

Description

I thought this would be Mimetes capitulatus but the pollen presenter appears to be filiform not conical at the apex. That might point to M. palustris but there are about 10 flowers in the capitulum. Unlikely to be M. hirtus - no plant more than 1m high.

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

diannemarais

Date

August 24, 2019 01:08 PM SAST

Description

Low shrub with single basal stem, some laterally sprawling, some erect. Flowerhead with a number of headlets with 3-6 flowers. involucral bracts yellow-green.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

magrietb

Date

August 10, 2019 11:25 AM SAST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

alexdietrick

Date

January 31, 2019

Description

Drosera rubrifolia. First photos of this species in situ

Photos / Sounds

What

Channelleaf Sugarbush Protea scorzonerifolia

Observer

carinalochner

Date

July 27, 2019 03:43 PM SAST

Description

Many flowers, buds and spent flowers. We were told second season after fire would be good and we were not disappointed. Did not expect it to start flowering so early though.

Photos / Sounds

What

Overberg Velvetworm Peripatopsis overbergiensis

Observer

sallyslak

Date

January 9, 2017

Description

Hurrah!


After years of searching under logs in deep forest, here it was sitting in the road. And I would never have seen it had I not left my camera at the river and had to do a 20 minute return trip. (Serendipity: the art of screwing up yet achieving a long-held ambition at the same time.)
Video of it jogging : https://youtu.be/cGU0CnKZADU

Tags

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Red Groundling Brachythemis lacustris

Observer

violettederozier

Date

March 16, 2019 01:19 PM CET

Photos / Sounds

What

Thyreus Cuckoo Bees Genus Thyreus

Observer

flippie1971

Date

June 15, 2019

Description

Thyreus bee sleeping in lavender.

Photos / Sounds

What

Klug's Sugar Ant Camponotus klugii

Observer

flippie1971

Date

June 9, 2019 11:30 AM SAST

Description

Black sugar ant found foraging on a rotten log.

Photos / Sounds

What

Scarlet Sugarbush Protea effusa

Observer

muisvoel

Date

July 10, 2019 11:13 AM SAST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

campbellfleming

Date

May 29, 2019 03:17 PM SAST

Place

Bloukop (Google, OSM)

Description

High altitude ~1500m at summit of Bloukop.

Photos / Sounds

What

Kouga Sugarbush Protea vogtsiae

Observer

campbellfleming

Date

May 29, 2019 02:57 PM SAST

Place

Bloukop (Google, OSM)

Photos / Sounds

What

Oleander-leaf Protea Protea neriifolia

Observer

klauswehrlin

Date

June 30, 2019 08:47 AM SAST

Description

2019 06 30 Maermanskloof Trail
Protea - Please explain

Photos / Sounds

What

Strawberry Spiderhead Serruria aemula

Observer

alexlansdowne

Date

June 27, 2019 11:41 AM SAST

Description

Introduced from Epping CA/Bofors Circle ca. 2010, planted by Maya Beukes. Also Erica subdivaricata here.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

mashudu

Date

June 25, 2019 03:47 PM SAST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

rkct

Date

February 24, 2012 11:06 AM SAST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

botaneek

Date

August 9, 2005

Description

Gladiolus aureus


CR; known only from a single locality, and all reintroductions seem to have failed; not particularly safe either, as close to a suburb and aliens present; very small population - typically only 10-30 plants flowering a year

Photos / Sounds

What

Cape Clawless Otter Aonyx capensis ssp. capensis

Observer

gigilaidler

Date

December 27, 2017 03:54 PM SAST

Description

Cape Clawless Otter feasting on Crayfish

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Red Handfish Sympterichthys politus

Observer

acanthaster

Date

April 24, 2018 09:57 AM AEST

Description

The rarest of the rare...

Photos / Sounds

What

Zebra Mantis Shrimp Lysiosquillina maculata

Observer

rcoliveira84

Date

May 28, 2016 03:49 PM SAST

Description

I know it's a Mantis Shrimp, just not sure which one.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Protea Sect. Speciosae Section Speciosae

Observer

cubs2ndbergvliet

Date

April 27, 2019

Photos / Sounds

What

Parrot-beaked Tortoise Homopus areolatus

Observer

christo9

Date

April 27, 2019 10:24 AM SAST

Photos / Sounds

What

Cape Klipspringer Oreotragus oreotragus ssp. oreotragus

Observer

aidanbennetts

Date

April 26, 2019 05:26 PM SAST

Photos / Sounds

What

Cape Clawless Otter Aonyx capensis ssp. capensis

Observer

gigilaidler

Date

April 28, 2019 06:32 PM SAST

Description

A couple of otters feeding in a little inlet at Olifantsbos provided a rich reward for iNatting actvities during the City Nature Challenge 2019
Video here: https://youtu.be/0BmSevhiQQk

Photos / Sounds

What

Cape Cobra Naja nivea

Observer

willemvzyl

Date

April 26, 2019 08:40 AM SAST

Photos / Sounds

What

Oleander Aphid Aphis nerii

Observer

magrietb

Date

April 27, 2019 01:18 PM SAST

Description

On Gomphocarpus physocarpus.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

African Leopard Panthera pardus ssp. pardus

Observer

evan81

Date

April 29, 2019 08:42 PM SAST

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

botaneek

Date

May 5, 2019 12:35 PM SAST

Description

patch of about 150 plts in 0.1ha area, sandy soils near stream, only seasonally damp, reseeder to 1m

Photos / Sounds

What

Satin Heath Erica bibax

Observer

magrietb

Date

April 26, 2019 11:44 AM SAST

Photos / Sounds

What

Cape Nutseed Proteoids Subtribe Leucadendrinae

Observer

sethmusker

Date

April 26, 2019 01:36 PM CET

Photos / Sounds

What

Grey Snakestem Pincushion Leucospermum hypophyllocarpodendron ssp. canaliculatum

Observer

tonyrebelo

Date

October 14, 2013

Description

What Sandveld Pincushion is this.


Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Table Mountain Staglike Ground Beetle Pachyodontus languidus

Observer

josh_weeber

Date

April 26, 2019 01:52 PM SAST

Photos / Sounds

What

Kouga Sugarbush Protea vogtsiae

Observer

nicky

Date

January 19, 2019 08:20 PM SAST

Photos / Sounds

What

Southern African Dwarf Chameleons Genus Bradypodion

Observer

vynbos

Date

December 22, 2015 12:54 PM SAST

Description

Found him in the dense foliage of a stream. I'd never have noticed him if it weren't for his colours which lit him up like a Christmas tree. Was he courting?

Photos / Sounds

What

Tooth-leaf Sugarbush Protea denticulata

Date

August 10, 2018 01:34 PM SAST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

kevinjolliffe

Date

October 9, 2014 10:58 AM HST

Photos / Sounds

What

Woodland Sugarbush Protea angolensis

Observer

andrew_hankey

Date

January 10, 2009 04:43 PM SAST

Tags

Photos / Sounds

What

Scraggly Conebush Leucadendron cinereum

Observer

gigilaidler

Date

November 6, 2018 11:48 AM SAST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

gigilaidler

Date

November 6, 2018 12:38 PM SAST

Photos / Sounds

What

Wuppertal Spiderhead Serruria flava

Observer

linkie

Date

October 3, 2013

Description

Serruria flava


Tags

Photos / Sounds

What

Wuppertal Spiderhead Serruria flava

Observer

nigelforshaw

Date

October 21, 2012

Description

Serruria flava


Does the Eselbank community know what they are doing to Serruria flava?

Tags

Photos / Sounds

What

Wuppertal Spiderhead Serruria flava

Observer

tonyrebelo

Date

September 10, 2016

Description

Yellow Spiderhead


Tags

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Firewheel Heath Erica massonii var. massonii

Observer

nigelforshaw

Date

March 9, 2009

Description

Erica massonii being observed with Mimetes stokoei in the background


Tags

Photos / Sounds

Observer

felix_riegel

Date

October 13, 2018 11:05 AM CEST

Description

De Hoop NR Potberg Klipspringer Hiking Trail

Photos / Sounds

Observer

tonyrebelo

Date

September 4, 2017 03:47 PM SAST

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Black-capped Chickadee Poecile atricapillus

Observer

tom15

Date

December 5, 2015 10:28 AM EST

Photos / Sounds

What

Jaguar Panthera onca

Observer

greglasley

Date

August 16, 2017 07:40 AM CDT

Description

On August 16, we witnessed what has to rank with one of the most incredible wildlife experiences I’ve ever had. Cheryl and I were on a trip with 6 other nature photographers and our leader. We had been in the Pantanal area of Brazil for about a week with 5 days along the Cuiaba River near Porto Jofre, looking for Jaguars and other photo ops. Our daily routine was breakfast at 5:30 AM and we took off on boats from 6 till about 11AM, lunch at noon at the lodge, then on the boats again 3PM till dark. Our group has 3 boats so just 3 people per boat so plenty of room for photo gear, etc. Over several days we had seen 10-12 Jaguars. Some were very good photo ops, some poor photo ops, some just glimpsed.

There are several lodges in the area and it is a popular place to visit for folks hoping to see Jaguars, so much like Yellowstone National Park, a crowd can gather when some significant wildlife is seen, but instead of car jams to see a Grizzly such as Yellowstone, this can be boat jams for a jaguar. I have seen as many as 22 boats, 70-100 feet off shore with lots of people in each boat taking photos of a sleeping Jaguar. BUT…that is not the end of the story! We were often in more remote areas of the rivers and inlets and streams more or less on our own looking for birds, etc., so lots of times there are no other boats around. The boat drivers all have radios, so if a Jaguar is seen, other boats are informed. We move 20-25 miles up and down the river to explore, so many times other boats are not close enough to arrive while a Jaguar is in view.

My limited Jaguar experience is that some are just sleeping and/or resting and mostly ignore the boats in the river. Others are walking though the edge of the forest near the river and when a boat becomes visible, the animal just vanishes back into the forest. This morning at about 7:30 AM our three boats were in an out-of-the way location, a mile or so apart. The boat I was in was photographing a Great Black Hawk when one of our other boats called us on the radio to say they had a Jaguar swimming in the river, apparently hunting, so we headed to that area. Apparently the Jaguar, with just its head visible, swam up to loafing Yacare Caimans and pounced onto a caiman which was about 6 or so feet long. The Jaguar and the caiman thrashed in the water with the Jaguar biting into the skull of the caiman. That is about the time our boat arrived, after the Jaguar had mostly subdued the caiman, but the caiman was still thrashing about. The Jaguar was up against a high dirt bank, still mostly in the water with a firm grip on the skull of the caiman and the Jaguar was not letting go. It was very dark and under heavy foliage and vines so I was shooting at 4000 and 6400 ISO but that was my only choice. Eventually the Jaguar was able to work itself and its prize away from the vines and it drug the caiman out of the water and up the dirt bank and eventually back into the forest to enjoy its catch beyond the curious and amazed eyes of the human observers. The caiman was as large or larger than the Jaguar. All I have to say is that a mature Jaguar is an incredibly powerful predator and watching this whole 15 minute episode is something I’ll not forget. What a beast!

This entire series was shot from a boat, perhaps 40 feet off the bank with a Canon EOS 7D Mark II and a Canon 100-400 IS lens in case anyone is interested.

Cuiaba River,
near Porto Jofre,
Pantanal,
Brazil
16 August 2017

Photos / Sounds

What

Black-breasted Snake-Eagle Circaetus pectoralis

Observer

happyasacupcake

Date

May 30, 2018 02:20 PM SAST

Description

We saw the snake eagle as it flew up from the ground. It flew in slow circles while it controlled and started to eat the snake. One minute from pic 1 to pic 8 where it started to eat the snake. Total time for this series, three minutes.

Snake at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/14774517

Photos / Sounds

What

Berg Adder Bitis atropos

Observer

vynbos

Date

December 22, 2018 03:22 PM SAST

Description

Found on the path, it kindly let me know it was there by huffing loudly from behind a bush. Struck in my direction when I walked toward it, then huffed its way off the path.
Last image is a gif of it striking (in slow-mo), it gets itself right off the ground.

Tags

Photos / Sounds

What

Serval Leptailurus serval

Observer

srullman

Date

July 14, 2017 05:18 PM EDT

Description

Melanistic

Photos / Sounds

Observer

aspiestog

Date

December 16, 2018 12:02 PM SAST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

botaneek

Date

November 7, 2008

Description

Spatalla salsoloides


One of the rarest of all Proteaceae, and one of the hardest to find. High altitude specialist. Still in early bud (cold site)

Tags

Photos / Sounds

What

Cape Dune Molerat Bathyergus suillus

Observer

vynbos

Date

September 24, 2015

Description

Cape Dune Mole-rat


I didn't realise how large they were, or at least this one was big, the size of a dassie. I saw it strolling along and followed it. It turned and came right at me. Although they have eyes, this one seemed blind, and couldn't see me. He then took a leisurely dig into an existing sand heap, and sped up a bit when I made some noises.
You can see the full video here.

Photos / Sounds

What

Heartleaf Sugarbush Protea cordata

Observer

muonmo

Date

September 8, 2012

Description

Heart-Leaf Sugarbush


Lots of plants but too young to be flowering!

Photos / Sounds

What

Catherinewheel Pincushion Leucospermum catherinae

Observer

tonyrebelo

Date

November 4, 2018 10:21 AM SAST

Description

Population collapse?
Upper half of population 80 plants prefire, with 6 seedlings. Lower half of population 40 plants with 12 seedlings.
All along the north side of the river.
Future expansion of the vineyards to the south will eliminate the bottom half of the population.
Veld 2 years old, so will need to see what makes it to reproduction.

Expect seed banks to still be relatively intact though, although that wont count to an EIA on a vineyard expansion.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

muisvoel

Date

November 18, 2018 11:49 AM SAST

Description

Historical records speak of Protea rupicola on Pieke and Rifberg, but I've never had any luck. Banghoek Peak proved more fruitful.

Could only find one plant, but definitely not for a lack of trying. It was already tricky to get to this plant. I'm pretty sure there are many more on the rock faces and cracks around here.

It's clear a helicopter team has been sent to clear Banghoek Peak of pines. It's just sad they stopped metres before this plant. The slope below and east of it are covered in pines!

Photos / Sounds

Observer

muisvoel

Date

November 18, 2018 09:19 AM SAST

Photos / Sounds

What

Bokkeveld Sceptre Paranomus bracteolaris

Observer

tonyrebelo

Date

November 3, 2018 11:49 AM SAST

Description

Its twisting time

It is not often that one finds visitors to Pa brac - normally the bushes just sit there unvisited.
But on days like today with a stiff warm breeze, and Berg Winds conditions with temperatures in the almost-30s things can start humming ...

Catch while you can!

Photos / Sounds

Observer

evieb

Date

September 29, 2018 05:00 PM SAST

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

botaneek

Date

November 4, 2018 12:38 PM SAST

Description

to 1.4m; loamy soils; reseeder

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

tonyrebelo

Date

October 10, 2004

Description

Lost Spiderhead


Photos / Sounds

Observer

muonmo

Date

September 22, 2018 04:53 PM SAST

Description

There is so much of this stuff here!

Photos / Sounds

Observer

tonyrebelo

Date

August 27, 2018 08:57 AM SAST

Photos / Sounds

What

Highveld Gurneys Sugarbird Promerops gurneyi ssp. gurneyi

Observer

tonyrebelo

Date

August 27, 2018 08:57 AM SAST

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Kili Sugarbush Protea caffra ssp. kilimandscharica

Observer

lisascaglione

Date

July 22, 2018 07:51 AM MDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Sterrebos Leucadendron nitidum

Observer

magrietb

Date

August 4, 2018 02:45 PM SAST

Description

Cederberg tolbos

Photos / Sounds

What

Bottle Green Heath Erica sessiliflora

Observer

tonyrebelo

Date

October 8, 2011

Description

Why Heaths are not serotinous


Serotiny is a staple of the Proteaceae, but also occurs in a few other families with large plants (e.g. Widdringtonia, Bruniaceae). It is the strategy not releasing seeds (also known as "bradyspory" - delayed seed release) until they need to be released.
Plants can be strongly serotinous (and for instance never release the seeds, relying on a fire to release it for them) or weakly serotinous (dropping the seeds after a few years of storage). Some Australian Proteaceae are strongly serotinous, but most of ours area weakly serotinous, dropping their seeds the moment the live leaf-level advances above the fruit heads (typically 5-6 years in young plants, to 2-4 years at 10 years of age, and only for a single year by 25 years).
And yet there is only one serotinous Erica.
Part of the issue is simply that the seedheads must remain safe and out of the fire. Seedheads that fall onto the ground are likely to be cooked or burned up: the fire is both hotter on the ground and lasts longer, consuming more fuel.

Simply most Ericas are too spindly. Why? Dont know, but my theory is that in Fynbos with nutrient poor states, Ericas divert nitrogen to their mycorhiza (Proteas dont have mycorhiza!) and so cannot grow robust. Because they cannot guarantee a stem thick enough to hold the fruit high up during a fire, they cannot be serotinous.

Only Erica sessiflora has got it right and it has accomplished this by making thick stems and keeping the seeds in heads with the sepals and bracts especially fleshy and succulent. Central to this is that leaves must be dropped on older stems (most Fynbos plants do this anyway - why keep dead leaves: recycle their nutrients whichever way possible), the stems must be thick and the seedheads held high above the canopy.

But there must also (perhaps) be a wood density issue. In a stand where everything is burned to the ground and not a trace of an Erica, Pincushion or Phylica remains, the serotinous Protea and Erica sessiliflora skeletons stand proud and erect and unscathed, ready to release their seeds over the week or two after the fire.

Photos / Sounds

What

Conebushes Genus Leucadendron

Date

May 17, 2018 11:41 AM SAST

Description

This is a sp. nova confirmed by Tony Rebelo. When are you going to describe it Tony?

Photos / Sounds

What

Knysna Dwarf Chameleon Bradypodion damaranum

Observer

colin25

Date

April 5, 2018 11:53 AM SAST

Description

A movement on the road caught my eye and on approaching was thinking of either something had caught a chameleon or it was injured and thrashing about in death throes. They were absolutely still after this flurry of movement, just eyes moving. One brief flurry again, followed by another long period of almost absolute motionless, another brief flurry and they parted. Never seen one as pitch black as the female, marking around the eyes standing out almost as clearly as under UV light. Both returned to more normal colours rapidly after parting, both removed by hand to the relative safety of near by shrubs. Total time actually witnessed 1 hour and 5 minutes, but I believe from others that they started mating some time before that.
Comments of selling price of a breeding pair shocking at R12 000 or there abouts!

Photos / Sounds

Observer

tonyrebelo

Date

February 1, 2012

Description

Waxbug on Renosterbos


Tried to get the wax off the bugs and just squished them.
What is the easiest way to photograph the actual bug?