Chaparral

Here are five observations that I think are a good representation of a chaparral environment. This one is located on the Tiburon Peninsula.
Coyote Brush--this plant is ubiquitous in chaparral areas in the Bay Area. It has small leaves, presumably to save the plant water in its dry environment.
Western Fence Lizard--lizards, being ectotherms, need warm, sunny places to regulate their body temperatures. This chaparral environment has few large trees, ideal for minimizing shade and maximizing sun basking opportunities.
Genus Dudleya, Powdery Liveforever--this is a very interesting plant, one I would expect to find in the desert rather than a chaparral environment. Its thick, succulent leaves are ideal for retaining water on dry, rocky perches.
Coyote Mint--this plant has a thick, succulent stem, an adaptation ideal for a dry, rocky environment.
Caloplaca Ignea (Red Fire Ant Lichen)--this lichen likes exposed rocks, and the tree-less, serpentine studded chaparral environment is perfectly suited for its abundant growth.

Posted by caj392 caj392, February 20, 2013 04:13

Observations

Photos / Sounds

What

Coyote Mint (Monardella villosa)

Observer

caj392

Date

February 16, 2013 03:51 PM PST

Photos / Sounds

What

Bluff Lettuce (Dudleya farinosa)

Observer

caj392

Date

February 16, 2013 03:57 PM PST

Photos / Sounds

What

Western Fence Lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis)

Observer

caj392

Date

February 16, 2013 04:02 PM PST

Photos / Sounds

What

Coyote Brush (Baccharis pilularis)

Observer

caj392

Date

February 16, 2013 04:07 PM PST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

caj392

Date

February 16, 2013 04:11 PM PST

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