Guide to TX Anemones (the plants, not the cnidarians)

There are some neat anemones here in Texas, but key features need to be photographed before they can be distinguished. Here's a guide that I've put together (and am still working on). Please feel free to suggest edits and share the link to this journal post:

https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/pfau_tarleton/15022

Guide to TX Anemones:
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1llZApbJ29F2h9w7EYA7D3B-cDAcQra0GC01zWMCvVc8

Posted by pfau_tarleton pfau_tarleton, March 25, 2018 09:43 PM

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@sambiology, @kimberlietx, @suz, @bob777, @oz4caster, @connlindajo, @alisonnorthup, @andyk, @tadamcochran, @joshua_tx, @gcwarbler
Please contribute to this guide to TX anemones (any corrections/changes/simplifications) and distribute freely.

Posted by pfau_tarleton 11 months ago (Flag)
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Great guide!

Posted by annikaml 11 months ago (Flag)
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If there was a drone in the sky today, it would have seen nothing but my backside. I was either leaning over or crawling from patch to patch flipping anemone flowers looking for pubescence hoping for an A. caroliniana. None today, but I'm going to stop by a spot where I saw them last year for sure!

I thought @suz had mentioned in a comment somewhere that the back side of the sepals of A. caroliniana are also pubescent. Did I dream that or misread it?

A BIG THANK YOU for putting this together! I wish there was a way to attach files or journal posts like this to the taxa pages. Got it bookmarked and will share it!!

Posted by kimberlietx 11 months ago (Flag)
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@kimberlietx, yes, I did say that Anemone caroliniana has long hairs on the underside of the sepals. I found that information at this online site: https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/flower/carolina-anemone. I found that characteristic and posted it in this observation: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/10348524. I thought about suggesting that characteristic be included in this guide, but I didn't know why it wasn't included. Perhaps, all botanists don't recognize that as a characteristic.
I think the guide is great for those of us who aren't professional botanists, but amateurs.

Posted by suz 11 months ago (Flag)
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I'm not sure about the underside of sepals....

berlandieri:
abaxially hairy, especially toward base, adaxially glabrous or hairy toward base;
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=233500050

caroliniana:
abaxially sparsely hairy, adaxially glabrous or nearly so;
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=233500052

Posted by pfau_tarleton 11 months ago (Flag)
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Well I can tell you without a doubt that berlandieri sepals are NOT hairy on the back. I have looked at hundreds today.

Posted by kimberlietx 11 months ago (Flag)
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I was having trouble getting iNat observations to agree with the descriptions of sepal hairiness also--that's why I left it out of the guide. This paper says, of berlandieri: "densely pubescent (not glabrous as stated in Britton, 1891)"

and of caroliniana: "abaxially densely pubescent"

Taxonomic revision, phylogenetics and transcontinental distribution of Anemone
http://www.botany.kiev.ua/doc/bulakh_bjls_2009.pdf

Posted by pfau_tarleton 11 months ago (Flag)
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I figured there was a reason. Thanks for sharing the paper with us.

Posted by suz 11 months ago (Flag)
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I can tell you from first hand research today... 1,000 A. berlandieri in Keller are glabrous. :D

Posted by kimberlietx 11 months ago (Flag)
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I trust you, Kim, more than the publications!

Posted by pfau_tarleton 11 months ago (Flag)
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Bahaha!

Posted by kimberlietx 11 months ago (Flag)

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