July 23, 2022

Stink Bug species I have observed

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I found a new-to-me species of Stink Bug yesterday, so I decided to write a journal post listing all the Stink Bug taxa which I have observed so far,. That includes seven observations from here in NYC, two from California, and three from Nevis, West Indies. A few of them are ID'ed only to the genus level.

The observations are listed here in chronological order, but I have only listed the first observation of each of the species, not any subsequent observations of the same taxon, except where the ID is only to the genus level.
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2022, July 30, Green Stink Bug (Chinavia hilaris) nymph in NYC
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/128697747

2022, Green Stink Bug (Chinavia hilaris) adult
In NYC. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/127443434

2020, Dusky Stink Bug (Euschritus tristigmus) adult
In NYC. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/58907451

[Supposedly this is also a Dusky Stink Bug in NYC
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/57361817]

2020, Rice Stink Bug (Oebalus pugnax) adult
In NYC. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/56445481

2020, One-spotted Stink Bug (Euschistus variolarius) adult
In NYC. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/46879534

2019, Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys) nymph
In NYC. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/31440819

2019, Bagrada Bug (Bagrada hilaris) adult
San Diego, California. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/33377340

2018, Red-Shouldered Stink Bug (Thyanta custator) adult
In NYC. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/16081372

2018, Twice-stabbed Stink Bug (Cosmopepla lintneriana) adult
In NYC. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/14578429

2018, Red-banded Stink Bug (Piezodorus guildinii) adult
On the island of Nevis, West Indies. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/12361310

2018, Brown Stink Bugs (genus Euschistus) adult
On the island of Nevis, West Indies. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/11519535

2018, Neotropical Red-Shouldered Stink Bug (Thyanta perditor) adult
On the island of Nevis, West Indies. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/11358799

2018, Green Stink Bugs (genus Chinavia) a mating pair of adults
On the island of Nevis, West Indies. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/11277494

2017, Southern Green Stink Bug (nymph) (Nezara viridula)
in San Diego, California. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/7971932
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Thirteen species so far. I hope with a bit of luck to find more soon.
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Posted on July 23, 2022 21:34 by susanhewitt susanhewitt | 2 observations | 4 comments | Leave a comment

June 30, 2022

On these iNaturalist project leaderboards

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I decided to make a list of the projects (21 of them) in which I am currently on the top of both of the project leaderboards. In this list, the two numbers following the name of the project are the number of observations I have made, and the number of species I have observed, as of today.

Some items on this list will not change as time passes, because the project is now closed, but some are ongoing, and therefore will change.

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ABIOME: Wild plants and animals of the Lesser Antilles: 8,719, 717

Biodiversity of Saint Kitts and Nevis, 7,898, 623

Biodiversity of Randall's Island, 17, 970, 1,273

Biodiversity of Carl Schurz Park, 8,338, 771

City Nature Challenge 2019 Manhattan, 1,777, 335

City Nature Challenge, 2020, 2,516, 303

Central Park Observations, 10,486, 777

Eastern Seaboard Mollusks, 4,419, 261

Eastern Shore Seashells, 5,521, 282

Governors Island Wildlife (Traditional), 1224, 425

Gov Island/Fall 2021 NYU BioBlitz!, 1,013, 384

Harlem River, 90th-125th St. + Pier 107. 2,187, 300

Jackson Heights Urban Nature Club Observations. 106,441, 4,129

Moths of New York County. 673, 98

Plant Pathogens of the Eastern United States. 2793, 233

PURSUE PORCELAIN-BERRY. 796

New York City EcoFlora. 83,061, 2,485

SEARCH FOR SOLANUM. 142, 6

SEEK SEASIDE GOLDENROD. 346

Wider Caribbean Shells. 291, 136

Wild Sanibel Island. 8,734, 916
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.......................................................................................................................................................................................................
Here is an additional list of projects for which I am on the leaderboards, but not at the top of both of the leaderboards. There are 35 of those projects. Obviously some of the items on this list will change as time passes, although the closed projects will not change.
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Amazing Aberrants, I am # 4 in number of observations.

Backyard Bio, I am # 4 in number of observations.

Behold Baccharis, I am #3 in number of observations.

Biodiversity of the Flushing Creek Estuary, I am #3 in numbers of both observations and species.

Airport Ecology, I am # 5 in term of observations

Animal-caused plant diseases of North America. I am # 1 in terms of observations, # 3 in terms of species.

Backyard Bio 2022 I am #3 in terms of observations and #5 in terms of species.

Beetle Biodiversity of New York State. I am #1 in terms of observations, and #4 in term of species.

Butterflies of New York County (Manhattan). I am # 1 in terms of observations, and # 4 in terms of species.

Bus Stop Observations. I am # 4 in terms of observations and species.

Biodiversity of the Flushing Creek Estuary, I am #3 in terms of both observations and species.

Animal-caused plant diseases of North America. I am # 1 in terms of observations, # 3 in terms of species.

Backyard Bio 2022 I am #3 in terms of observations and #5 in terms of species.

Beetle Biodiversity of New York State. I am #1 in terms of observations, and #4 in term of species.

Empire State Native Pollinator Survey, I am #2 in terms of most observations.

Climbing the Walls, I am #2 in terms of observations and #3 I terms of species.

Fungi of NYC - New York Mycological Society, I am #1 in terms of observations and #4 in terms of species.

Global Pollinator Watch. I am #1 in terms of observations.

COVID-19 Quarantine Blitz!. I was #1 in terms of observations.

DANGEROUS DUO. I was #4 in terms of observations.

Empire State Native Pollinator Survey. I was #2 in terms of observations.

Fungi of NYC - New York Mycological Society. I am #1 in terms of observations and #4 in terms of species.

Global Pollinator Watch. I am #1 in terms of observations.

Galls of the Eastern United States. I am #5 in terms of observations.

Leafminers of North America. I am #2 in terms of observations.

Lichens of New York City. I am #1 in terms of observations.

New Year's Day 60-Minute Bioblitz 2022. I was #2 in terms of observations and #3 in terms of species.

Non-Metazoan Plant Diseases of North America. I am #1 in terms of observations and #2 in terms of species.

Personal Bioblitz 2021. I was #2 in terms of observations.

Personal Bioblitz Spring 2017. I was #4 in terms of observations.

REPORT MUGWORT. I was #2 in terms of observations.

Nightshade Biodiversity (Genus Solanum). I am #1 in terms of observations.

Personal Bioblitz 2022. I was #4 in terms of observations.

Personal Bioblitz Spring 2018. I was #3 in terms of observations.

Rockefeller State Park Preserve. I am #3 in terms of observations and #3 in terms of species.

VERIFY VERONICA. I was #3 in terms of observations and #2 in terms of species.

WATCH FOR WHITE SNAKEROOT. I was #5 in terms of observations
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So, in total, I am present somewhere on the leaderboards of 56 different iNaturalist Projects.
That is 56 out of the 187 projects I have taken part in over the years. That's 31% of them. Not bad!
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Posted on June 30, 2022 23:47 by susanhewitt susanhewitt | 30 observations | 3 comments | Leave a comment

June 24, 2022

INDEX to Susan Hewitt's iNaturalist journal posts

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I wanted to make my journal posts easier for me to search, in order to be able find the ones I wanted to look at again, so I created this Index. I will try to keep it updated.
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2015...................................................................................................................................................

May 01, 2015 "Nature in the West Indies" While staying at Green Flash on Jones Bay, Nevis.
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/4079
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2016.....................................................................................................................................................

Mar 03, 2016 "Why do scientific names change?"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/5625

Mar 29, 2016 "Is it Spring yet in New York City?"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/5835

May 31, 2016. "A deserted beach on St. Kitts"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/6372

Jun 07, 2016 "Connecticut State BioBlitz 2016, mollusks"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/6421

Jun 21, 2016 "What makes iNaturalist so great?"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/6520

Jun 26, 2916 "A salt-loving plant on the roadside"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/6606

Aug 17 2016 "Creatures fallen into the swimming pool"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/6995

Oct 07, 2016 "Using iNaturalist in Southern California"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/7477

Nov 25, 2016 "Is it wrong to feed wild animals?"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/7921

Dec 11, 2016 "Every seashell is a death"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/8026
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2017..............................................................................................................................................

Jun 04, 2017 "Seashells from an island in New York City"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/10347

Jun 25, 2017 "Exotic shells in weird places"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/10608

Jul 08, 2017 "Non-marine mollusks from Randall's Island, NYC and Wave Hill in the Bronx"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/10751

Sep 30, 2017 "Using iNaturalist in Southern California, Part 2"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/11857
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2018................................................................................................................................................

Jan 12, 2018 "Sanibel Island versus Randall's Island"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/13668

Jan 21, 2018 "Seashell list from New Haven, Connecticut"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/13814

Feb 01, 2018 "Mystery of the distribution of an estuarine clam species"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/14009

Mar 05, 2018 "Updated list of mollusks from Randall's Island"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/14576

Apr 17, 2018 "Bad foot forces me to concentrate..."
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/15535

Apr 18, 2018 "Earthquake today on Nevis"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/15536

May 07, 2918 "The Naturalist versus the Weed Whacker, part 1, West Indies"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/16366

Sep 19, 2018 "The Naturalist versus the Weed Whacker, part 2, New York"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/18709

Nov 12, 2018 "Seaweeds of NYC"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/19785
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2019.................................................................................................................................................

Feb 02, 2019. "More marine mollusks from Saba, Caribbean Netherlands"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/21280

Apr 27, 2019 "City Nature Challenge 2019, a nice day"
https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/carl-schurz-park-biodiversity-project/journal/24137

May 01, 2019 "City Nature Challenge 2019 - the days for identification"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/24431-city-nature-challenge-2019

May 09, 2019 "City Nature Challenge 2019 - thanks everyone!"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/24761

May 09, 2019 "And now, forward... De Kay's Brownsnake"
https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/carl-schurz-park-biodiversity-project/journal/24763

Jun 02, 2019. "Plant pests, pathogens and galls, why do we overlook them?"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/25267

Jun 26, 2019 "Fungal pathogens on plants in NYC"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/25709

Jun 26, 2019 "Leafminer species in NYC"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/25711

Jul 10, 2019 "Insect and mite plant pests in NYC"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/archives/2019/07

Jul 11, 2019 "Carl Schurz Park, July is summer, Eastern Cicada-killer Wasp"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/26107

Aug 08, 2019 "How to tell a Brown-lipped Snail from a White-lipped Snail"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/26586
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2020.....................................................................................................................................

Jan 01, 2020 "On the iNaturalist global leaderboards for December 2019"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/29786

Feb 24, 2020. "Scale insects are amazing"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/31049

Mar 20, 2020 "Great fleas have little fleas upon their backs to bite 'em"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/31916

Apr 12, 2020. "The Green Man"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/32949

Apr 15, 2020 "More of the Green Man"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/33155

Apr 26, 2020 "What does a "stay-at-home" order mean?"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/34052

May 01, 2020 "Mosses of Manhattan"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/34518

May 22, 2020 "Viruses attacking plants, not people"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/36292

Jun 30, 2020 "Freshwater habitats, the flora and fauna?"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/37897

Jul 08, 2020 "Volunteer plants in Carl Schurz Park"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/38130

Oct 01, 2020 "Euphorbia peplus, the Petty Spurge"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/41894

Oct 01, 2020 "The genus Phyllanthus"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/41918

Oct 16, 2020 "Orchard Beach, NYC, marine life species"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/42934

Nov 11, 2020 "Want to learn about the seashells of the Northeastern US?"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/43831

Nov 11, 2020 "Plumb Beach Brooklyn, NYC, marine life"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/43832

Dec 09, 2020 "Project: Marine Mollusks of the Eastern Seaboard, dead or alive"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/44630

Dec 25, 2020 "Senior Hiker magazine, "An Urban Naturalist", an article by Susan Hewitt about using iNat to explore Randall's Island"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/44932-senior-hiker-magazine-an-urban-inaturalist-an-article-by-susan-hewitt-about-using-inat-to-explore-randall-s-island

Dec 31, 2020 "On iNaturalist's global leaderboards for December 2020"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/45081
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2021................................................................................................................................................................

Jan 08 2021 "Philadelphia Academy, I will give a Zoom talk about iNaturalist and shells"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/45304

Mar 17, 2021 "Finding the Magnolia Threetooth land snail, Triodopsis hopetenensis, in NYC"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/47845-finding-the-magnolia-threetooth-land-snail-triodopsis-hopetenensis-in-nyc

May 14, 2021 "Sanibel nature is so great, and so varied"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/51835-sanibel-nature/edit

May 14, 2021 "Susan Hewitt gives a Zoom talk to the Marine Biological Association of the UK"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/51854
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvATd6Qo0UY

May 20, 2021 "Unknown stem galls on Common Mugwort"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/52165

Jun 02, 2021 "How to find small and tiny seashells to increase your life list"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/52887

Jul 02, 2021 "Birds that visit my NYC bird feeder"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/53864

Jul 03 2021 "Why am I interested in malacology and nature study?"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/53878

Aug 01, 2021 "Randall's Island, a nature outing"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/54883

Aug 27, 2021 "Summer bucket list in NYC"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/55757

Sep 28, 2021 "Governors Island, once military, then coastguard, but now lots of nature!"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/57332

Dec 14, 2021 "Rare shells from Turner Beach, Captiva, on the Gulf Coast of Southwestern Florida"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/60465

Dec 14, 2021 "On the iNaturalist leaderboards for December, three years running?"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/60485
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2022......................................................................................................................................................

Jan 03, 2022 "Inwood Hill Park on January 2nd, fungi, snails & slugs, moss"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/60913

Jan 04, 2022 "Captiva island yields three Elliptical Sportellas , a small shell, but a big story"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/60959

Mar 01, 2022 "Interviewed by the New York Times about iNaturalist"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/62471

Apr 13, 2022 "Butterflies from the island of Nevis, April 2022"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/63968

Apr 17, 2022 "Why don't I make more seashell observations on Nevis, West Indies?"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/64102

Apr 21, 2022 "Spiders from Saint Kitts and Nevis, April 2022"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/64368

Apr 23, 2022 "Fort Ashby, Nevis, West Indies, an Earth Day Clean-up and Nature Survey"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/64478

Apr 24, 2022 "Moths from the island of Nevis, West Indies, April 2022"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/64322

May 07, 2022 "Back to NYC for spring and part of City Nature Challenge"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/65581

May 20, 2022 "Sutton Place Parks"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/66309

May 30, 2022 "Conservatory Garden in Central Park, a renovation"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt/66615

Jun 19, 2022 "Rockefeller State Park Preserve, near Pleasantville, NY
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/67410

Jun 24, 2022 "INDEX to Susan Hewitt's iNaturalist journal posts"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/67574

Jun 30, 2022. "On these iNaturalist project leaderboards"
https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/67774-on-these-inaturalist-project-leaderboards

July 23, 2022. "Stink Bug species I have found"
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/susanhewitt
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Posted on June 24, 2022 17:19 by susanhewitt susanhewitt | 1 comment | Leave a comment

June 19, 2022

Rockefeller State Park Preserve, near Pleasantville, NY

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I live in Manhattan, NYC. Yesterday a good friend of mine (@catverde) drove the two of us up to Rockefeller State Park Preserve, which is in the Hudson Valley near Pleasantville, about an hour's drive north of NYC. In the park during the afternoon, @pbuttercup was running a wildflower walk around Swan Lake, encouraging people to put their observations up on iNat.

I was kind of amazed once I got home again to find out that in about three hours on a Saturday afternoon, I had seen at least 26 lifers -- 26 species that I had never seen before.

That total of new things consisted of 18 vascular plant species, 6 arthropod species, and 2 fungi. And that total may quite likely increase, as people here on iNat check and improve my existing IDs, and also probably put a few IDs on things that don't yet have one.

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Out of the lifer arthropods I observed, the insects were:

Cordyligaster septentriodis, a bristle fly
Oulema sp., a handsome beetle
Spongy Oak Apple Gall Wasp
Bumelia Webworm Moth

Arachnid lifers were:

Eastern Harvestman
Aceria nyssae on Black Tupelo

Fungi lifers included:

Conifer mazegill -- growing out of a picnic bench

The vascular plants included:

Fox Grape
Shining Bedstraw
Wild Basil
Panicled Ticktrefoil
Round-headed Bush Clover
Deptford Pink
Bush's Sedge
Pointed Broom Sedge
Whorled Loosestrife
Meadow Buttercup
Meadow Rue
Sanicle
Pussytoes
American Lopseed
American Hog Peanut
Wild Sarsaparilla
Honewort
Sallow Sedge

I added all of my observations to the project "Rockefeller State Park Preserve", here:
https://inaturalist.ca/projects/rockefeller-state-park-preserve

And immediately I appeared in third place on their leaderboards for the most observations (155) and the most species observed (102). I seem to have added about 9 species to their iNat list for the preserve, so that's good.

I would love to go back there sometime, and my friend Caterina is interested in going back too. The park has many interesting areas to visit which are different from the areas around Swan Lake, and there are no doubt a lot more new-to-me species to be found in all those areas.

Posted on June 19, 2022 19:09 by susanhewitt susanhewitt | 42 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

May 30, 2022

Conservatory Garden in Central Park, a renovation

I tried to visit the Conservatory Garden today, and I was really dismayed to see that the English Garden (the southern one, which is normally full of flowers by now) is completely fenced off, and currently the French Garden has nothing at all planted in its large beds, whereas normally they would already have planted the young Korean Chrysanthemums, plus all the decorative flowering items which usually line either side of the four entranceways.

In the English Garden they have ripped out everything underfoot -- all of the paths and steps -- and will completely re-do those. Personally I thought they had been fine, and did not need to be replaced.

I asked, and the optimistic guess is that they will be finished sometime during this fall. But I suspect the work may not be completed until the spring of 2023.

In the meantime I will have no access to see all the butterflies and flower flies and so many other great flying and non-flying insects that I am used to seeing in the English Garden in summer, and I will have nowhere to go to see all of the fabulous flying insects in search of nectar and pollen in October and November, when they all usually flock to the flowers of the late-blossoming Korean Chrysanthemums in the French Garden. I will also probably miss seeing the several uncommon and interesting weed species that seem to show up each year in the French Garden.

I know that @steven-cyclist and @zitserm will find this all to be bad news. @karenholmberg will also be disappointed that I can't soon show her what I can normally find there.

Currently you can still walk the path that loops around the outside of all three gardens, but I suppose they may close that too at some point.

Posted on May 30, 2022 21:48 by susanhewitt susanhewitt | 5 comments | Leave a comment

May 20, 2022

Sutton Place Parks

This afternoon I had to be on 1st at 56th, so afterwards I walked across to Sutton Place so I could visit the little parks there. There are five of them, pocket parks, but I only visited three of those.

There were quite a lot of weeds, most of them not very surprising.

But the best thing I found was Shining Crane's-Bill (Geranium lucidum) which is a pretty small geranium, a species I have never seen before anywhere.

There was also a mass of green aphids on the new growth of a Solidago species. I am not sure about the ID of the aphids.

Posted on May 20, 2022 22:28 by susanhewitt susanhewitt | 9 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

May 07, 2022

Back to NYC for Spring and part of the City Nature Challenge 2022

So... we got back to NYC very late on Saturday April 30th. I was expecting NYC to be noticeably more green after four weeks away in the tropics (the West Indies), and it does look a lot more like mid to late spring now than it did before we left NYC on April 2nd. Apparently the weather here in NYC was mostly cold and dry during the four weeks we were gone.

The two days after I got back, Sunday May 1st and Monday May 2nd, were the last two days of the global City Nature Challenge (CNC). I had decided to do my part by going iNatting the Freshwater Wetlands area of Randall's Island on the Sunday, and inatting in John Jay Park and Carl Schurz Park on the Monday. Steven Bodzin came with me on the Sunday outing. It was very nice, warm and sunny, although I don't think I found anything new, and there were not a lot of insects out yet.

Monday was on and off rain, mostly drizzle, so not great for iNatting, but not terrible. However, my foot was hurting a fair bit, so I could not walk all around in Carl Schurz Park, but I covered two areas.

I did OK in terms of getting a decent number of observations for CNC, and adding quite a few species to the Personal Bioblitz 2022 project.

On May 5th I went to the 106th Street area of Central Park with my old friend Pat Redding. It was nice to see her and the weather that day was also sunny and warm.

At home while I was away I entirely lost "my" usual flock of twenty Mourning Doves, but gradually they are coming back to the bird feeder, and now I have six of them.

The best organism I have found since I have been back is the spectacular "Tongues of Fire" rust fungus, Gymnosporangium clavariiforme, which I found lost of on a garden Juniper on my block of 77th Street on May 4th. My image of that species was featured on the front page of the New York Mycological Society email newsletter for Saturday May 7th.

Posted on May 07, 2022 17:07 by susanhewitt susanhewitt | 2 comments | Leave a comment

April 24, 2022

Moths from the island of Nevis, West Indies, April 2022

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As well as the butterflies I recorded, I did also manage to find a few moths on Nevis, so I thought perhaps I would try to list them here. Some of the IDs may be incorrect. And many are incomplete.

Towards the end of the list I have included several observations which may be duplicate species. Since I know so little, this was in the hope that someone more expert can tell me what is what.

The first group of small drab moths are from a grazing area inland a short distance, an area which is rich in Desert Horse Purslane and Alkali Heliotrope. The second group of drab-colored moths is from an area on the upper beach platform which has mostly Beach Morning Glory. I am assuming that at least some of the moth species that are present in each area are using the dominant plant(s) as a food species for their larvae.

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Genus Micrathetis
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112097747

Cabbage Webworm Moth maybe
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112098327

Crambid Moths
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111310654

Owlet Moths and Allies
.https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110576092

Hawaiian Beet Webworm Moth.
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110516598

Genus Achyra
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110516657

Achyra bipedalis
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110588824

Achyra sp.
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110711324

Bagworm Moths
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110839219

More Bagworm Moths
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112288768

Crambini
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110884120

Achyra bipedalis larva
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111309019

Spotted Oleander Moth
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111568129
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111701239

Triplex Cutworm Moth
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111701239

Genus Chrysoteuchia
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111973196

Genus Urola
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111973196

Triplex Cutworm Moth
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112207519

Eublemma recta Straight-lined Seed Moth?
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112207483

Crambid Snout Moths
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112207483

Genus Eublemma recta Straight-lined Seed Moth ?
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112207429

Genus Eublemma recta Straight-lined Seed Moth ?
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112207414

Genus Micrathetis
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112305554
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NOTE: If you look at my observations, you will see that some of the moths are photographed in situ on vegetation. Others were captured in a BioQuip child's butterfly net, then chilled until they were torpid, photographed, allowed to warm up, and then released to fly away.

Posted on April 24, 2022 17:17 by susanhewitt susanhewitt | 5 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

April 23, 2022

Fort Ashby, Nevis, West Indies, an Earth Day Clean-up and Nature Survey

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NOTE: Many of the IDs in this journal post will need to be refined and corrected.

On Earth Day I recorded 80 species of organisms at Fort Ashby, near the coast in the Cotton Ground region of Nevis. You can consult the following link to a calendar page to have a visual sense of what I was able to see. All but the first two and last four images were taken at or from Fort Ashby:
https://www.inaturalist.org/calendar/susanhewitt/2022/4/22
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Fort Ashby is a piece of land surrounding a coastal fort on the Caribbean Coast of Nevis. The fort was built in 1701 on a coastal point, near what was, in the 1600s, the original capital of Nevis, Jamestown. The fort was a simple stone structure, much of which remains intact. The design is semi-circular, and the outer wall, which faces towards the sea, still features four cannon.
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426636

But due to slow coastal build up of sand in this one part of the coast, the fort is now 100 yards back from the edge of the sea. There is also now a lagoon pond that reaches from one side of the piece of land to the other side -- Fort Ashby has private property on both sides of it. The lagoon at Fort Ashby was, until recently, crossed by a wooden bridge, but that has now disintegrated, so currently there is no way to access the beach directly from Fort Ashby.

At some point in recent times, one of the walls of the fort was extended upwards with concrete, and the entire structure was given a mostly open-air roof, in order to convert it into a bar-restaurant. Then subsequently, when the lease expired, the restaurant was abandoned, along with three small residences nearby, and at least one other small building.

After the restaurant closed, the entire area of Fort Ashby was not maintained, and it had recently become extremely overgrown with vegetation. The area was also occasionally misused for illegal dumping.

The Nevis Historical and Conservation Society (NHCS) is now in the process of reclaiming the site and improving it, so that it can become a natural, historical, and educational attraction for both locals and tourists.

A Nevis friend of mine, Miriam Knorr of NHCS, asked me if I would volunteer at Fort Ashby on Earth Day. Although the rest of the NHCS team were doing much-needed physical clean-up of the site, Miriam asked me if I would use iNaturalist to record and photograph the nature of the area. I spent nearly four hours there in the morning, making 160 nature observations of what appear to be 80 species. The other NHCS volunteers collected and carried out abandoned trash (two entire truckloads) and cut down a vast amount of invasive vegetation, which will be burned. There were six Nevis Historical and Conservation volunteers, 10 youth-group volunteers, Jahnel Nisbet who is the director of NHCS, and myself, for a total of 18 volunteers.

More trash will need to be removed.

My iNat lists and photos will eventually be used to create such things as a leaflet and signage, once the Fort Ashby site is fully restored and ready for visitors.
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PLANTS..................................................................................
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GARDEN PLANTS, brought in and planted deliberately by humans (7 species recorded)

African Baobab
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112421846
Bougainvillea
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426973
Common Lantana
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112422759
Glory-bower, Red Bleeding Heart Vine
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112424461
Crinum -- Swamp Lilies
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112421983
Fan Palms, Coryphoideae
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112422137
Mother-in-law's Tongue
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112424855
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WILD PLANTS
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All from the Scrubland area:

WILD TREES AND BUSHES (8 species recorded)

White Leadtree
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423499
Sea Almond
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426863
and
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112422397
Indian Mango
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112422423
Neem
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423380
Noni (seedling inside the fort)
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426242
Clammy Cherry
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112421583
Shrubby Indigo
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112421626
Sandbox Tree
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112424955
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SOFT PLANTS WILD -- includes wildflowers and weeds (27 species recorded)

Coral Bells aka Coralita
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423484
Bush Morning Glory
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426991
Painted Spurge
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426919
Genus Lagascea
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423077
Asthma Plant
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423270
Tridax Daisy
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423537
Castor Bean
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112424772
Blue Porterweed
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112422628
Gale of the Wind
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112421238
Porknut thorn bush
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112421292
Whitemouth Dayflower
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112421321
Browne's Blechum
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112421344
Common Fanpetals
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112421381
Lion's Ear
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112421417
Brazilian Bachelor's Button
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112422603
Scorpion's-Tail
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112422861
Caesar Weed
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112422910
Erect Spiderling
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423037
LIttle Ironweed
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423064
Lobed Croton
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423136
Asian Spiderflower
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423162
Legumes
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423307
Pyramid Flower
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423554
Graceful Spurge
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112424090
Amaranths
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112424167
Sacramento Bur
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112424330
Common Fan petals
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112427305
Devils Horsewhip
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423740
and
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112427209
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Species found on or inside of, the Fort structure itself (8 species recorded)
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Bitter Panicgrass
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426526
Brown's Sword Fern
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426411
Dicot Tree, ID unknown
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426321
Small Dicot Tree with some red leaves, ID unknown
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426284
Noni seedling
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426242
Siam Weed, Chromolaena odorata
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426218
Cure-For-All
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426188
Spiny Fiddlewood
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426599
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Monarch Fern
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112421927

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Plants growing near the lagoon pond (3 species recorded)

Nickernut
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112425732
Tree of Little Stars
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112425732
Beach Naupaka
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112425943
and
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426067

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FUNGI AND LICHENS (4 species recorded)
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Teloschistaceae
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426733
Common Lichens
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426481
and
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112421786
Shelf Fungi
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112425249
Agaricomycetes
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112427047

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ANIMALS OF EVERY KIND........................................................
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MAMMALS, REPTILES, BIRDS (Only three species recorded so far)

Domestic Cow -- a cow pat left behind
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426086
Schwartz' Anole
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426764

Green Heron -- no photo possible, but the bird was both seen and heard.
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INVERTEBRATE ANIMALS
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INSECTS
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Butterflies (5 species recorded)

Cloudless Sulphur
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112427165
Cramer's Scrub-Hairstreak
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112427111
Tropical Checkered Skipper
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423405
White Peacock
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423576
Cassius Blue
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112424820

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Other insects (9 species recorded)
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Band-winged Dragonlet, a dragonfly
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112423685
Rambur's Forktail , a damselfly
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112424036
Longhorn Crazy Ant
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112421707
Liriomyza a leafminer fly mining in a Bougainvillea leaf
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112427017
Cherrypie Leafminer in the Common Lantana leaves
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112422791
A leafminer in Nodeweed leaves
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112424358
A Phytomyzinae leafminer in leaves of Sacramento Bur
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112424632
Pit-trapping Ant-Lions
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426636
Australian Cockroach
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112425405
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Bees and wasps (2 species recorded)
Western Honey Bee
Common on the Coralita
Stictia signata a species of sand wasp
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112427262
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Beetles (1 species recorded)
Beetle larva burrows in dead wood
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426687
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Other arthropods (4 species recorded)
Blue Land Crab
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112422335
and
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426838
Spinybacked Orbweaver
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112424411
Gall and Rust Mites
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426439
Eriophyes pluchea mites on leaves of Cure-for-all
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426041
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Humans

Carrying an abandoned Fridge out of the woodland took 6 people.
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112425319

Metal debris to be removed
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112425358

An abandoned wheel
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112425405

One of the houses
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112426863

An abandoned door hanging (valance) from India
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/112849690

Posted on April 23, 2022 11:28 by susanhewitt susanhewitt | 16 observations | 4 comments | Leave a comment

April 21, 2022

Spiders from Saint Kitts and Nevis, April 2022

As an iNatter, when I visit somewhere I do my own bioblitz, and I try to make an observation of every species of organism that I come across. It is a bit haphazard as I don't deliberately search for any group other than seashells. However, I was able to find a few nice spiders while I was on this trip to KN, so I thought I would list them here. The IDs probably need some work.

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Genus Nigma
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110588781

Spiny Backed Orbweaver
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110681061

Genus Neriene
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110682378

Silver Garden Orbweaver
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110764863

Garden Orbweavers
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110765274

Spiny Backed Orbweaver
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/110801556

Theraphosine Tarantulas
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111310654

Genus Cytopholis
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/1580145

Genus Clubiona Leaf-curling Sac Spiders
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111697509
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Posted on April 21, 2022 11:55 by susanhewitt susanhewitt | 0 comments | Leave a comment