Meadowhawks -- Sympetrum

Reference: http://www.odonata.bogfoot.net/docs/Odonata%202015%20Jackson%20Bottom%20(day%202).pdf

Striped Meadowhawk - S. pallipes - striped thorax
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/62439945
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/62439009
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/62440223

"S. pallipes varies in a number of ways (geographically, individually, and with age). The pale thoracic stripes often darken and become very obscure with age—particularly late in the season. And the angle in this photo is not very helpful for assessing the thoracic pattern. So, just because pale thoracic stripes are not obvious on an individual, it doesn’t necessarily mean that it isn’t this species" @jimjohnson Curator

Cardinal Meadowhawk - S. illotum
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/50159817

Autumn Meadowhawk - plain thorax
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/62567136
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/62566709

(BTW I love that genus common name.)
Questions:
Is it a useful distinction (between striped and autumn Meadowhawks) that the Autumn Meadowhawk has a more pronounced spot on the front edge of each wing, towards the tip? @jimjohnson ppt says a "small amber patch" on leading edge, but with Striped meadowhawk there is the "maybe" distinction and with Autumn presumably it must always be present.
Answers: "In the case of the female (which this is), the scooped-shaped subgenital plate is diagnostic." arrowheadspiketail58
"Structural characters are always best when they are visible in photos." jimjohnson

Posted by williamkimzey williamkimzey, October 13, 2020 17:29

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