Helpful Tips when Submitting your Observations

How to fill in the ‘What did you see?’ (his question is found at the top left-hand side of the ‘Add an Observation’ page)

The best way to fill in this part of the observation, is dependent on the photos you add to the observation:

  1. The photos are of a plant species I am unfamiliar with and/or do not know the name of AND THERE IS NO RAINBOW LORIKEEET IN THE PHOTO: In the ‘What did you see?’ section, type plants. As you are typing, iNaturalist will offer suggestions underneath, CLICK ON THE PLANTS (KINGDOM PLANTAE) OPTION. People from the project and the iNaturalist community will then be able to make ID suggestions on your observation to help narrow down the potential plant species.
  2. The photos are of a plant species I know the name of: In the ‘What did you see?’ section, type the name of the plant species. As you are typing, iNaturalist will offer suggestions underneath, click on the name of your plant species.
  3. The photos are of plant species I am unfamiliar with and/or do not know the name of BUT THERE IS A RAINBOW LORIKEET IN THE PHOTO: In the ‘What did you see?’ section, you will be able to type and click on either Rainbow Lorikeet OR Plants.

What does captive/cultivated mean?

Checking captive/cultivated means that the observation is of an organism that exists in the time and place it was observed because humans intended it to be then and there. Likewise, wild/naturalized organisms exist in particular times and places because they intended to do so.

Captive/cultivated
o zebra in a zoo
o poppy in a garden
o butterfly mounted in a display case
o your cat
o garden plant/tree that was planted there by the gardener

Wild / naturalized
o zebra in the Serengeti (assuming it's not in a zoo in the Serengeti)
o weed in a garden
o butterfly that flew into your house

Here are links to help you use iNaturalist:
https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/help
https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/getting+started

Posted by lozb97 lozb97, July 22, 2021 23:50

Comments

We have Rainbow Lorikeets every summer in Bardon, Brisbane when the flowers are out on 1. The Blue Quandong, Elaeocarpus grandis, 2. Umbrella Tree, Heptapleurum actinophyllum, which has recently been cut down and on 3. Queen's Palm, Syagrus romanzoffiana. I am not sure of the latter species but what is interesting is that when the Rainbow lorikeets and Scaly-breasted lorikeets have finished feeding in the daytime, the Flying Foxes take over at night. Knowing the propensity for these to carry nasty neurological viruses that might be something to look at. Cheers Tim

Posted by ttimm about 2 months ago (Flag)

Thank you for your comment @ttimm and providing this list of plant species. Happy Rainbow Lorikeet Spotting!

Posted by lozb97 about 1 month ago (Flag)

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