Spring & Summer

With the arrival of warmer temperatures, everyone should start to see more spiders. There have been a few pictures posted of spiders walking across the snow which does happen even in winter, but the snowpack in most of the southern half of the state has already melted with the exception of the big snow pile at the local Walmart.

Some spider species overwinter as adults and are now out in pursuit of a mate. Others, like wolf spiders, are in juvenile stages in the early spring and can form miniature hordes as you walk through the grasses along wetlands (no, they don't hunt in packs). They mature quickly and adults can often be found before the month of May has passed.

The warmer months provide an abundance of prey and mating opportunities and it is the best time (and easiest time) to find mature spiders. Spiders can be found in nearly any habitat: on the ground, under logs, behind bark, under leaves, under eaves, etc. Look for webs of many shapes and sizes.

Spiders also have a knack for showing up in unexpected places. There is one first-state record in my collection that was collected on one of my students. A ballooning spider landed on her while she was walking to my class and she kept a careful eye on it until she got to class and we could get it in a vial. What dedication!

I look forward to seeing all the spiders that everyone finds! Good luck!

Posted by cheins1 cheins1, March 16, 2020 03:12

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