Medium
Photo © Ken-ichi Ueda, some rights reserved
Hammonasset State Park, Mad... (Google, OSM) Details Hide details

Description

We have a couple moon snails here, and two that are this large, so I can't be sure. Next time I'll check the book in the field!

Logo eee 15px

Comments & Identifications

1 thumb
Moon Snails - Photo (c) Femorale, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC)
kueda's ID: Moon Snails (Family Naticidae)
Posted by kueda almost 8 years ago (Flag)
211 thumb

looks alike to Natica didyma
Check that out
Size ?

Posted by vishalbhave over 7 years ago (Flag)
211 thumb
Posted by vishalbhave over 7 years ago (Flag)
1 thumb

WoRMS says Natica didyma is from Mozambique, and this snail was in Madison, Connecticut, USA, so I'm thinking it's not that. The limited field guide I had for intertidal inverts in the eastern US listed two moon snails, Polinices duplicatus and Lunatia heros, so I'm guessing it's one of those, but telling them apart apparently requires inspecting the shell aperture, which was kind of, uh, filled with snail in this case.

The size of the dish here was about 10 cm in diameter, so I guess the shell was around 4cm?

Posted by kueda over 7 years ago (Flag)
55228 thumb
Northern Moon Snail - Photo (c) Femorale, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC)
slapcin's ID: Northern Moon Snail (Polinices heros [inactive]) (inactive taxon)
Posted by slapcin almost 2 years ago (Flag)
55228 thumb

This is a bit too globose with shouldered whorls and impressed sutures for Polinices duplicatus now Neverita duplicata and looks like Lunatia heros now Euspira heros.

Posted by slapcin almost 2 years ago (Flag)
211 thumb
Bladder Moon Snail - Photo (c) Harry Rose, some rights reserved (CC BY)
vishalbhave's ID: Bladder Moon Snail (Neverita didyma) Added as part of a taxon swap
Posted by vishalbhave almost 2 years ago (Flag)
55228 thumb
Northern Moon Snail - Photo (c) Femorale, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC)
slapcin's ID: Northern Moon Snail (Euspira heros) Added as part of a taxon swap
Posted by slapcin almost 2 years ago (Flag)
1 thumb

Will check out my Long Island Sound guide when I get to it, John. Do you think this observation from down the beach is the same?

Posted by kueda almost 2 years ago (Flag)
55228 thumb

That other one is Neverita duplicata. The sutures are shallower and the shell more depressed with a larger and pigmented partial plug in the umbilicus.

Posted by slapcin almost 2 years ago (Flag)
50920 thumb
Posted by susanhewitt over 1 year ago (Flag)
50920 thumb

You did well to find a live one of these; they tend to live a bit deeper than the other species and are not as commonly found.

This species can get huge, as big as a grapefruit sometimes.

The umbilicus in this species is completely open, no umbilical callus at all.

Nice shot of this live one!

Posted by susanhewitt over 1 year ago (Flag)
Sign in or Sign up to add comments
Sign in or Sign up to add identifications
Moon Snails - Photo (c) Femorale, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC)
kueda's ID: Moon Snails (Family Naticidae)
Moon Snails - Photo (c) Femorale, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC)
Community ID: Moon Snails (Family Naticidae)
About
Northern Moon Snail - Photo (c) Femorale, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC)
slapcin's ID: Northern Moon Snail (Euspira heros) Added as part of a taxon swap
susanhewitt 1 person agrees
Bladder Moon Snail - Photo (c) Harry Rose, some rights reserved (CC BY)
vishalbhave's ID: Bladder Moon Snail (Neverita didyma) Added as part of a taxon swap
Logo eee 15px
Logo eee 15px

Data Quality Assessment

Needs ID
Details Hide details
Logo eee 15px
Observation by Ken-ichi Ueda
Cc0 small no rights reserved
Pin it button
Member of the iNaturalist Network   |   Powered by iNaturalist open source software