Mission: Spring Ephemeral Wildflower Phenology

Spring ephemeral wildflowers are perennial woodland plants that sprout from the ground early each spring, quickly bloom and seed before the canopy trees overhead leaf out. Once the forest floor is deep in shade, the leaves wither away leaving just the roots, rhizomes and bulbs underground. It allows them to take advantage of the full sunlight levels reaching the forest floor during early spring.

Long-term flowering records initiated by Henry David Thoreau in 1852 have been used in Massachusetts to monitor phenological changes. Phenology, the study of the timing of natural events such as migration, flowering, leaf-out or breeding, is key to examine and unravel the effects of climate change on ecosystems. Record-breaking spring temperatures in 2010 and 2012 resulted in the earliest flowering times in ...more ↓

Posted on April 19, 2015 04:09 PM by kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 4 comments | Leave a comment
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Ruby-throated Hummingbird Archilochus colubris

Observer

rebelgirl73

Date

May 6, 2015

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zaccota

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May 4, 2015

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zaccota

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May 4, 2015

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zaccota

Date

May 4, 2015

Place

Essex, VT (Google, OSM)

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Bloodroot Sanguinaria canadensis

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zaccota

Date

May 4, 2015

Place

Essex, VT (Google, OSM)

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AMGO Spinus tristis

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zaccota

Date

May 6, 2015

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GRCA Dumetella carolinensis

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zaccota

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May 6, 2015

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Ostrich Fern Matteuccia struthiopteris

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zaccota

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May 6, 2015

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zaccota

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May 6, 2015

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zaccota

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May 6, 2015

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zaccota

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May 6, 2015

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Virginia Waterleaf Hydrophyllum virginianum

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rwp84

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May 6, 2015

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TUTI Baeolophus bicolor

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zaccota

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May 6, 2015

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WODU Aix sponsa

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zaccota

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May 6, 2015

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Yellow Warbler Setophaga petechia

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rwp84

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May 6, 2015

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GRHE Butorides virescens

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zaccota

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May 6, 2015

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SAVS Passerculus sandwichensis

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zaccota

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May 6, 2015

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Red Trillium Trillium erectum

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rwp84

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May 6, 2015

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LESA Calidris minutilla

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zaccota

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May 6, 2015

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Song Sparrow Melospiza melodia

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rwp84

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May 6, 2015

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Spotted Sandpiper Actitis macularius

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rwp84

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May 6, 2015

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TRES Tachycineta bicolor

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zaccota

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May 6, 2015

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Common Merganser Mergus merganser

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rwp84

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May 6, 2015

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RTHA Buteo jamaicensis

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zaccota

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May 6, 2015

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yellow trout lily Erythronium americanum

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rwp84

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May 6, 2015

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SAVS Passerculus sandwichensis

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zaccota

Date

May 4, 2015

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Ostrich Fern Matteuccia struthiopteris

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zaccota

Date

May 4, 2015

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BAOR Icterus galbula

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zaccota

Date

May 4, 2015

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yellow trout lily Erythronium americanum

Observer

rwp84

Date

May 6, 2015

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AMRE Setophaga ruticilla

Observer

zaccota

Date

May 4, 2015
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About

It started with a simple question. How many species occur in Vermont? You’d think we’d know this for a small state steeped in a rich tradition of naturalists dating back to Zadock Thompson and his seminal 1842 work on the natural history of Vermont. But, the simple answer was, no one really knew.

We do know how many species there are of some of the popular taxonomic groups like birds ...more ↓

Discussion

Partners

Vermont p for Ecostudies

Four Winds Nature Institute

ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center

Vital Communities

Northern Woodlands

Southern Vermont Natural History Museum

Vermont Entomological Society

Southern Vermont Natural History Museum North Branch Nature p Keeping Track

Otter Creek Audubon Society

The Vermont Reptile & Amphibian Atlas

One World Conservation Center

Merck Forest and Farmland Center

317 mini kpmcfarland created this project on December 18, 2012

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