Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • English
    • C F
    • Cha
    • Chaffinch
    • Common Chaffinch
  • Portuguese
    • Tentilhão
  • Scientific Names
    • Fringilla coelebs
  • Unknown
    • Pinsà comú
  • Spanish
    • Pinzón común
  • Dutch
    • Vink
  • German
    • Buchfink
  • Aou 4 Letter Codes
    • COCH

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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

What

Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs

Observer

joepb

Date

November 27, 2014

Description

Hear unseen. Definitely on-site

Photos / Sounds

What

Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs

Observer

anis

Date

September 11, 2014

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs

Observer

anis

Date

November 4, 2014

Photos / Sounds

What

Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs

Observer

m_jon

Date

November 21, 2014 09:58 AM NZDT

Description

This little chaffinch was sitting stunned on the side of the road. I put it somewhere safer further from the road.

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

Observer

finrod

Date

October 29, 2014

Place

P 4704 (Google, OSM)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

chaffinch Fringilla coelebs

Observer

gus320

Date

November 21, 2014

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

chaffinch Fringilla coelebs

Observer

gus320

Date

November 21, 2014

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs

Observer

tony_wills

Date

March 21, 2011 06:04 PM NZDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs

Observer

mainebirder

Date

May 14, 2010

Description

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S6522304
Warts (viral papillomas)

Agent: The Fringilla papillomavirus (FPV).

Epidemiology: The epidemiology of the disease has not been studied.

Species susceptible: Chaffinches and, to a lesser extent, bramblings. In a large survey of birds captured for ringing in the Netherlands, papillomas were found on 330 (1.3%) of some 25,000 chaffinches examined and both sexes were affected. However, cases usually occur in clusters and quite high proportions of local populations may be affected in outbreaks.

Clinical signs: The disease causes warty outgrowths on the foot or tarsometatarsus (the bare part of the leg). Usually only one limb is affected. The growths vary from small nodules to large irregular shaped and deeply-fissured masses which almost engulf the entire lower leg and foot and which can distort the toes. Affected birds usually seem in otherwise good health but some may show signs of lameness and hop mainly on the unaffected foot and digits may be lost. The warts grow slowly and may progress over many months.

Pathology: The growths have a similar structure to warts in mammals and are due to excessive growth of the keratinised layers of the skin.

Risks to human and domestic species: None known.

Diagnosis: The clinical appearance is strongly suggestive but other diseases can cause swellings on the legs and feet: infestation with Cnemidocoptes mites (there is some evidence for an association between mange due to Cnemidocoptes infestations and the occurrence of papillomas), bacterial infections (bumblefoot), poxvirus infections. Diagnosis can be confirmed by histology or detection of papillomavirus particles.

Impact on populations: It seems unlikely that this disease has an impact on population densities.

Impact on welfare: Even birds with large papillomas often appear to behave normally so, in some cases, the growths may be little more than an inconvenience and relatively minor irritation. However, lameness is sometimes observed and this clearly indicates pain.

Treatment: None. The outcome of the disease is unclear. Birds may die through being incapacitated or through developing secondary infections but it is possible that in some cases the lesions may regress spontaneously.

Control and prevention: The fact that cases occur in clusters suggests that the presence of affected birds presents a risk to others that are susceptible. The mode of transmission is not known but it seems likely that the virus may be spread via surfaces the birds stand or perch upon. If so, hygiene measures and steps to minimise crowding at perching or feeding sites may reduce the risk.

Wikepdia

Photos / Sounds

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What

Common Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs

Observer

speedy

Date

November 13, 2014

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs

Observer

d_kluza

Date

November 7, 2014

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

chaffinch Fringilla coelebs

Observer

gus320

Date

November 7, 2014
View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

The Common Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs), usually known simply as the Chaffinch is a common and widespread small passerine bird in the finch family. The male is brightly coloured with a blue-grey cap and rust-red underparts. The female is much duller in colouring but both sexes have two contrasting white wings-bars and white sides to the tail. The male bird has a strong voice and sings from exposed perches to attract a mate.

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Conservation Summary

    Source: BirdLife International (2011) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 31/07/2011.