Globally near threatened (NT) (Source: IUCN Red List)

Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • Scientific Names
    • Cryptobranchus alleganiensis
    • Cryptobranchus bishopi
    • Salamandra alleganiensis
  • English
    • Hellbender
    • Ozark Hellbender
    • Eastern Hellbender
  • Unknown
    • Eastern Hellbender
    • Ozark Hellbender
  • Spanish
    • Salamandra gigante norteamericana

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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis

Observer

david10

Date

May 1, 2014 01:00 PM EDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

What

Eastern Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis ssp. alleganiensis

Observer

ashleytubbs

Date

April 10, 2012 01:23 PM CDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Super cool animal!

Photos / Sounds

What

Eastern Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis ssp. alleganiensis

Observer

pete_woods

Date

September 30, 2008

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

These two eggs had been washed out of nest somewhere upstream. They were 3/4 of an inch in diameter. The embryos were alive and kicking.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Eastern Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis ssp. alleganiensis

Observer

anothca

Date

June 11, 2011

Place

Hiwassee River, Polk Co, Tennessee, USA (Google, OSM)

Description

In-situ, on the bottom of the river.

Photos / Sounds

What

Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis

Observer

briansg

Date

June 11, 2012

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

The hellbender, or as some refer to them, snot otters, are one of the slipperiest of salamanders. As the picture illustrates, it's a lot easier to hold them if you don't try to restrain them.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Eastern Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis ssp. alleganiensis

Observer

weberbirding

Date

August 31, 2013 01:34 PM EDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

What

Eastern Hellbender (Subspecies Cryptobranchus alleganiensis alleganiensis) Cryptobranchus alleganiensis ssp. alleganiensis

Observer

dnydick

Date

July 26, 2013 12:20 PM EDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

privileged to be invited hellbendering with the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy's watershed staff

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis

Observer

robertsprackland

Date

the past

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

7576222680_00c8d70a2a_s

What

Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis

Observer

briangratwicke

Date

July 13, 2012 01:35 PM EDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis

Observer

mikeygraz

Date

September 3, 2011

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis

Observer

dnydick

Date

August 2, 2011

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Found during a Hellbender inventory trip with biologists from the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy and Clarion University. This guy is now the proud owner of an rfid chip.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis

Observer

mikeygraz

Date

the past

Place

(Somewhere...)
View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

The hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis), also known as the hellbender salamander, is a species of giant salamander endemic to eastern North America. A member of the Cryptobranchidae family, hellbenders are the only members of the Cryptobranchus genus, and are joined only by one other genus of salamanders (Andrias, which contains the Japanese and Chinese giant salamanders) at the family level. These salamanders are much larger than any others in their endemic range, they employ an unusual means...

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Conservation Summary

  • Globally
    near threatened (NT) (Source: IUCN Red List)
    vulnerable (G3G4) (Source: NatureServe)
    Vulnerable. Wide range in the central interior portion of the eastern U.S.; many populations have declined or have been eliminated by dams, sedimentation, water pollution, and overcollecting; better information is needed on the conservation status of this species in much of its range.
Source: IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2. . Downloaded on 10 November 2011.