Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • Scientific Names
    • Sceloporus olivaceus
    • Sceloporus floridanus
    • Sceloporus spinosus floridanus
    • Sceloporus thayerii
  • English
    • Texas Spiny Lizard
  • Spanish
    • lagartija espinosa del noreste

Guide Colors

 

Extras

Taxonomic changes »

Taxon schemes »

Make taxonomic Flickr tags for this taxon »

Invite photos from other sites »

Wikipedia taxobox »

Tree Browser »

Search descendant taxa »

Embed a widget for this taxon on your website »

Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Texas Spiny Lizard Sceloporus olivaceus

Observer

sambiology

Date

July 29, 2015

Description

Didn't get a good shot, but I'm fairly sure it's this.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Texas Spiny Lizard Sceloporus olivaceus

Observer

enoack

Date

June 28, 2015 12:32 PM CDT

Description

Observed in parking lot at St Peters in Boerne. Looks quite healthy

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Texas Spiny Lizard Sceloporus olivaceus

Observer

jaredholmes

Date

July 28, 2015 09:28 AM CDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Texas Spiny Lizard Sceloporus olivaceus

Observer

zooga1961

Date

July 27, 2015

Description

today on my parent's front porch was a Texas Spiny Lizard sunning itself.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Texas Spiny Lizard Sceloporus olivaceus

Observer

sambiology

Date

July 25, 2015

Description

Young

Photos / Sounds

What

Texas Spiny Lizard Sceloporus olivaceus

Observer

naturenut

Date

July 26, 2015

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Texas Spiny Lizard Sceloporus olivaceus

Observer

nancyed

Date

July 22, 2015

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

hiding in dead Ashe juniper

Real County, TX

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Texas Spiny Lizard Sceloporus olivaceus

Observer

sambiology

Date

July 22, 2015 05:48 PM CDT

Description

Wife found inside the house, so of course, I had to catch it and release it outside. :)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Texas Spiny Lizard Sceloporus olivaceus

Observer

manuelnevarez

Date

July 18, 2015

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Texas Spiny Lizard Sceloporus olivaceus

Observer

andyk

Date

July 21, 2015 09:33 AM CDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Texas Spiny Lizard Sceloporus olivaceus

Observer

aguilita

Date

April 20, 2015

Description

20 April 2015: Observed a Texas Spiny Lizard (Sceloporus olivaceus) hugging a large tree trunk of a very tall Bois d'Arc (Maclura pomifera) tree that's probably been around for much longer than I have on this fine Earth. The trees are home for the Texas Spiny Lizard. In spring and summer one can usually spot them on the trees if one is to spot them at all. Its mottled skin colors and patterns provide excellent camouflage as protection from predators when perched on any number of the trees it favors.

This one was taking in the early spring sun and to me at least (who does not know much about lizard biology), it had either recently taken a large meal or it was a female and it was pregnant with its batch of spring life signaling and assuring the next generation of Texas Spiny Lizards on the banks of Cooper Creek and Avondale Park. I don't know for sure but that's the story I read into the situation. Moreover, it wasn't in a hurry to scurry off. It gave me plenty of time to be able to take as many pics as I wanted.

From Wikipedia's thumbnail sketch for the Texas Spiny Lizard we know this with respect to its range: "[It] is a species of phrynosomatid lizard native to the south central United States, in the states of Texas and Oklahoma, and northeastern Mexico in the states of Coahuila, Nuevo León, Tamaulipas, and San Luis Potosí. They are quite common throughout their range, where they can be found in trees or on fences."

So the Texas Spiny Lizard is found in both the United States and Mexico with Texas and Oklahoma comprising its US range and Mexico's northeastern and northeast central states of Coahuila, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí and Tamaulipas rounding out its southern range. Call it a North American species that has a rather specific regional range.

With their tail included these lizards can range between 7.5 to 11 inches when fully grown. The third of the three images up above presents one with it spread in its full length on the trunk of the Bois d'Arc (a tree known by several other colloquial names given it by people in the United States including Osage Orange, Bodark, Hedge Apple, Horse Apple, Bodock, and Monkey Apple). Interestingly, Bois d'Arc trees occur in both female and male form, and the one this lizard inhabited was a male of the species. Male Bois d'Arc trees do not generate the archetypical "horse apple" that's given it the plural colloquial names. The tree has been planted in all 48 states of the continental United States and in southeastern Canada.

Texas Spiny Lizards have scales with a "distinctly spiny texture to them. They have long toes, and sharp claws suited to climbing," according to the Wikipedia entry. And we couldn't agree more.

Photos / Sounds

19845164885 cab6a7a920 s

What

Texas Spiny Lizard Sceloporus olivaceus

Observer

bcfl14

Date

July 19, 2015
View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

The Texas spiny lizard (Sceloporus olivaceus) is a species of phrynosomatid lizard native to the south central United States, in the states of Texas and Oklahoma, and northeastern Mexico in the states of Coahuila, Nuevo León, Tamaulipas, and San Luis Potosí. They are quite common throughout their range, where they can be found in trees or on fences.

Logo eee 15px

Conservation Summary

    Source: IUCN 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.4. http://www.iucnredlist.org/technical-documents/spatial-data. Downloaded March 2011.