Globally critically endangered (CR) (Source: IUCN Red List)

Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • Tagalog
    • Pawikan
  • French
    • Caret
    • Tortue À Bec Faucon
    • Tortue À Écailles
    • Tortue Caret
    • Tortue Imbriquée
    • Caret
    • Tortue Caret
    • Tortue
    • Tortue Imbriqu
  • English
    • Hawksbill Turtle
    • Hawksbill Sea Turtle
    • Hawksbill
  • Spanish
    • Tortuga carey
  • Scientific Names
    • Eretmochelys imbricata
    • Chelone imbricata
    • Chelonia imbricata
    • Chelonia radiata
    • Testudo imbricata
  • German
    • Echte Karettschildkröte
  • Seri
    • moosni quipáacalc
  • Portuguese
    • Tartaruga-de-escamas

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Extras

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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

What

Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata

Observer

blogie

Date

March 28, 2015 01:47 PM CST

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Based on tail size, this individual appears to be female. I observed her descending from the reeftop and she paused just out of arm's length away from me. She looked to be about almost a meter long.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata

Observer

blogie

Date

February 14, 2012 10:12 AM CST

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

This hawksbill turtle (locally called "pawikan") appeared to be a juvenile, measuring only about half a meter long.

Photos / Sounds

What

Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata

Observer

lovelyclemmy

Date

June 23, 2015 07:45 AM EET

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Pict0107

What

Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata

Observer

lovelyclemmy

Date

June 22, 2015 07:45 AM EET

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

What

Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata

Observer

lovelyclemmy

Date

June 22, 2015 07:45 AM EET

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

What

Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata

Observer

almeyda64

Date

May 23, 2015

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata

Observer

iveirizarry

Date

June 2, 2015 12:09 PM EDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

What

Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata

Observer

rmooi

Date

March 24, 2015 03:00 AM PDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Pacific Hawksbill Eretmochelys imbricata ssp. bissa

Observer

scottboxx17

Date

May 17, 2012

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

This Eastern Pacific Hawksbill, Eretmochelys imbricata, was the first official reported capture of the species utilising the mangroves of La Barrona as a foraging ground. This lead to Akazul joining the EPH initiative called ICAPO, and forming a national network for sightings of the species across the country.

Photos / Sounds

What

Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata

Observer

traveling_rose

Date

June 5, 2015 08:26 AM GST

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Sea turtle release at EMEG

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata

Observer

seanhiggins

Date

September 10, 2010

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata

Observer

salmonskyview

Date

March 10, 2015

Place

(Somewhere...)
View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

The hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) is a critically endangered sea turtle belonging to the family Cheloniidae. It is the only extant species in the genus Eretmochelys. The species has a worldwide distribution, with Atlantic and Pacific subspecies. E. i. imbricata is the Atlantic subspecies, while E. i. bissa is found in the Indo-Pacific region.

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Conservation Summary

  • Globally
    critically endangered (CR) (Source: IUCN Red List)
    vulnerable (G3) (Source: NatureServe)
    Vulnerable. Widely distributed in tropical and subtropical seas, but due to heavy exploitation much less abundant than in the past, and likely still declining; at least 20,000 females nest each year; nesting locations have been reduced due to beach development and disturbance.
No range data available.