Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • French
    • sérotine brune
    • grande chauve-souris brune
  • Scientific Names
    • Eptesicus fuscus
  • Spanish
    • Murciélago-moreno norteamericano
  • English
    • Big Brown Bat
  • Yuto Nahua
    • sopichí

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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus

Observer

regalis

Date

August 9, 2014 09:45 PM EDT

Description

Confirmed ID using Echo Meter Touch bat detection software

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus

Observer

therealbatman

Date

May 16, 2015

Place

Simcoe (Google, OSM)

Description

Flying and feeding above trail / stream.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus

Observer

ga_smith

Date

May 2, 2015 09:35 PM EDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus

Observer

npollock66

Date

March 3, 2015

Description

Had an injured wing :(

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus

Observer

denniswross

Date

February 21, 2015

Place

Woods Gap (Google, OSM)

Description

Hi Dennis,
Thanks for the note. I remember you, and the bat corpse! You probably do have big brown bats on the move during the winter. Unfortunately, it's due to loss of fat reserves due to WNS. I know that wildlife rehabbers in the state are getting ALOT more bats this year than in previous years. My guess is that the big brown bats are moving out of their hibernacula (caves, attics, etc.) to feed, and then using some old day roosts, like your bat box, for a day here and there. It's not surprising that you are finding scat. It's just too bad that they are using the bat box, as it's less climate controlled than their hibernacula options. At the same time, it's a better, safer option for them vs. more exposed options. There's nothing you need to do - the bats will move if they get too cold, and hopefully go back to their long-term resting areas. The less we disturb them, the better. We just keep our fingers crossed, and hope they can make it through this awfully cold, snowy time.
Cheers,
Karen

____________________________________________
Karen E. (Francl) Powers, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Biology
235 Curie
Box 6931
Radford University
Radford, VA 24142
(540) 831-6537 (office); (540) 831-5129 (fax)
________________________________________
From: Ross Dennis [forensicbotanist@gmail.com]
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2015 4:51 PM
To: Powers, Karen
Subject: Big brown bats -- not migrating?

Karen,

We have met several times at the Mt Rogers Naturalists’ Rally. Last spring I showed you a corpse of a bat which you identified as a Big Brown. A small colony (up to 15 individuals) spends summers in a ‘bat box’ under the eaves of my house near Floyd, VA. I take note of their approximate arrival and departure each year. This year they left around the end of October 2014. This is when I last saw them, and when I no longer need to sweep up their scat.

However, around December I began noting scat in smaller quantities but identical to what I normally see in summer. I have noted scat accumulating irregularly, but continuing throughout the winter to the present. Dis-aggregating the scat with a sharp needle suggests insect parts when viewed with a magnifying glass.
I have not seen any bats. I have avoided disturbing the bat box (i.e. climbing a ladder to open it up and look in). You have instructed me in how sensitive bats are to be disturbed during hibernation.

My questions: I did not think the Big Brown bat would ‘hibernate’ in its summer location.
Do bats defecate during hibernation?
Am I mistaking mouse droppings for bat droppings? There are none in the house where I would expect mice, and none except under the bat box.

Other than continued observation, is there anything that you recommend I do. I am glad to send you samples or show the bat box to you or one of your students.

Sincerely,

Dennis Ross MD, PhD — retired professor of Pathology UNC

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus

Observer

drdon

Date

May 25, 2014 09:30 PM EDT

Description

Flying 9pm

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus

Observer

mperdicas

Date

January 11, 2015 11:54 AM EST

Description

Male, hibernating in building

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus

Observer

jenny

Date

December 6, 2014 04:53 PM EST

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Accidentally trapped in garage.

Photos / Sounds

What

Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus

Observer

mcpd_biologist

Date

November 11, 2014

Description

Found lying dead (relatively fresh) in the bed of a pickup truck, Presumably fell from the ceiling of the barn vehicle is regularly parked in. Estimating about 3 inches in length based on width of my hand.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus

Observer

nhmordenana

Date

August 3, 2014 08:33 PM PDT

Description

This is the first Big Brown bat detected at the La Brea Tar Pits. The species was identified using echolocation analysis software.

Photos / Sounds

What

Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus

Observer

th0th

Date

September 2, 2014

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus

Observer

tiertza

Date

August 1, 2014

Description

Encontré 2 individuos de Eptesicus fuscus y un individuo de Tadarida brasiliensis que se refugian juntos detrás de un cuadro colgado en el patio de una casa particular.

I found 2 individuals of Eptesicus fuscus and 1 individual of Tadarida brasiliensis who roost together behind a painting hung in the patio of a private home.

View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

The big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) is native to North America, Central America, the Caribbean, and extreme northern South America.

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Conservation Summary