Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • Scientific Names
    • Microbiotheria
  • English
    • Microbiotheres
  • Spanish
    • Monito de monte

Extras

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Creative Commons Flickr Photos Tagged "Microbiotheria."
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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Observer

fonturbel

Date

January 15, 2012

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

One individual was captured at an old-growth native forest stand, Valdivian Coastal Reserve.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

fonturbel

Date

February 23, 2012

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Two individuals were captured at an old-growth native forest stand, Valdivian Coastal Reserve

Photos / Sounds

What

Comadrejita Enana Dromiciops gliroides

Observer

fonturbel

Date

October 31, 2011

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Three individuals were captured between October 2011 and February 2013 at an Eucalyptus plantation with abundant native understory vegetation. Valdivian Coastal Reserve.

Photos / Sounds

What

Comadrejita Enana Dromiciops gliroides

Observer

fonturbel

Date

April 13, 2008

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

A few (seven) individuals were captured at a 5-ha very disturbed forest fragment, dominated with second-growth vegetation.

Photos / Sounds

What

Comadrejita Enana Dromiciops gliroides

Observer

fonturbel

Date

November 5, 2007

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Wild individuals captured in an old-growth native forest remnant of about 30 ha. From November 2007 to November 2008 we captured 65 different individuals at this location.

View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

The monito del monte is the only extant member of its family (Microbiotheriidae) and the only surviving member of an ancient order, the Microbiotheria. The oldest microbiothere currently recognised is Khasia cordillerensis, based on fossil teeth from Early Palaeocene deposits at Tiupampa, Bolivia. Numerous genera are known from various Palaeogene and Neogene fossil sites in South America. A number of possible microbiotheres, again represented by isolated teeth, have also been recovered from the Middle Eocene La...

No range data available.