Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • English
    • Lamiales
  • Scientific Names
    • Lamiales
    • Callitrichales
    • Plantaginales
    • Scrophulariales
  • Chinese (Traditional)
    • 脣形目

Extras

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Creative Commons Flickr Photos Tagged "Lamiales."

Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Lavender Genus Lavandula

Observer

cesarpollo5

Date

June 12, 2015

Photos / Sounds

What

green ash Fraxinus pennsylvanica

Observer

eraskin

Date

July 1, 2015

Description

sapling/sucker at base of larger individual

Photos / Sounds

What

Chinese Privet Ligustrum sinense

Observer

adamfrancis

Date

July 1, 2015 12:03 PM EDT

Description

Chinese privet
Management Plan

Introduction
Description
Impacts
Management
Preventative
Cultural
Mechanical
Physical
Biological
Chemical
Notes on Herbicides
References
View Management Plan as PDF (216 KB)
View Presentation on this Species:
Powerpoint format (PPT 17.1 MB)
Adobe PDF format (PDF 1.0 MB)
Introduction
Chinese privet is frequently found growing in disturbed sites from the northern counties south to Hillsborough county and Miami-Dade county. It is native to China but escaped cultivation.

There are about 50 species of Ligustrum, all native to Europe, North Africa, and Asia. Ligustrum has been developed into an assortment of ornamental varieties in the U.S. and other parts of the world. In 1852, privet was introduced to the United States for use as an ornamental shrub and is still commonly used as a hedge. Because of Ligustrum’s ability to tolerate air pollution and other poor environmental conditions, it was regarded as a great landscape plant and planted extensively. Unfortunately, this was before its invasive characteristics were discovered. Establishment of privet in many natural areas of Florida has occurred through its escape from cultivation. Glossy privet (L. lucidum) is listed as a Category II species with the potential to disrupt native plant communities in Florida by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council. Chinese privet (L. sinense) is a Category I species that is currently disrupting native plant communities in Florida.

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Description
Ligustrum spp. are perennial shrubs that can grow up to 16 feet in height. Ligustrum bark is tan to gray in color with a smooth texture. Leaves are elliptic to ovate in shape, oppositely arranged on twigs. Flowers have both male and female parts. Each flower has petals fused into a tube with four separate lobes. Flowers are borne on small panicles on short lateral branches on the end of the twig. The oblong, blue/black fruit is a drupe containing 1 to 4 seeds. Fruit clusters persist through the winter. Mature trees can produce hundreds of fruit.

L. lucidum (glossy privet) is a large shrub or tree that grows to 30 feet in height, with spreading branches. Leaves are ovate to somewhat lanceolate and 3 to 5 inches long. L. sinense (Chinese privet) is smaller than glossy privet, growing to only 20 feet in height. Leaves are elliptic to somewhat oblong, 1 to 3 inches long, and pubescent on the midrib below.

Ligustrum spp. grows readily from seed or from root and stump sprouts. Wildlife can aid in the dispersal of the seed, often relocating the plant over long distances.

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Impacts
Ligustrum spp. is capable of invading natural areas such as floodplain forests and woodlands. The aggressive nature of privets allows for the formation of dense thickets that out compete desirable plants. The amount of seed produced by privet is another mechanism for its prolonged survival. Even though privet is still used in the landscape and available for purchase at garden centers and online distributors, it is an invasive weed and should be treated as such.

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Management
Ligustrum spp. control methods include mechanical controls such as mowing and cutting, physical control such as seedling removal and burning, and chemical control such as herbicide application. Herbicide control measures include foliar spraying in late autumn or early spring with glyphosate, triclopyr, or metsulfuron; cut stump applications using glyphosate or triclopyr; and basal bark applications of triclopyr.

Preventative
The first step in preventative control of privet is to limit planting and removal of existing plants within the landscape. If possible, removal should occur before seeds are produced. Since seeds remain on the plant for several months, care must be exercised to prevent seed spread and dispersal during the removal process.

Cultural
Plant native or non-invasive alternatives. Avoid large disturbances that allow for invasive species to colonize.

Mechanical
For smaller infestations or areas where herbicide applications are not feasible mowing and cutting are appropriate. Stems should be cut as close to the ground as possible at least once per growing season. Mowing and cutting will not eradicate Ligustrum spp., but it will provide some level of management. Continuous mowing will work, but frequency is key.

Physical
Hand pull young seedlings and small plants. Larger plants may need to be dug out. Plants should be pulled as soon as possible, before they produce seeds. The entire root must be removed to prevent resprouting.

Biological
Ligustrum spp. has no known biological control agents.

Chemical
Foliar applications of glyphosate or cut-stump applications of triclopyr or glyphosate are effective. Stems

Photos / Sounds

What

American brooklime Veronica americana

Observer

mbowser

Date

June 30, 2015

Photos / Sounds

What

wild bergamot Monarda fistulosa

Observer

toughnutz31

Date

July 1, 2015 09:19 AM EDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Ram's Horn Proboscidea louisianica

Observer

quirino

Date

September 15, 2013

Photos / Sounds

18700326073 cb32d16a12 s

What

Ngaio Myoporum laetum

Observer

jon_sullivan

Date

March 21, 2015 03:34 PM NZDT

Photos / Sounds

4575329140 7ce2ff310c s

What

Bean Broomrape Orobanche crenata

Observer

valter

Date

May 2, 2010 03:05 PM WEST

Description

Location: Europe > Portugal > Algarve

Date Photo Taken: May 2, 2010

© Copyright. You cannot use! Only Encyclopedia of Life (EOL)

Photos / Sounds

5664127406 dddb8777f9 s

What

Common Broomrape Orobanche minor

Observer

valter

Date

April 22, 2011 09:28 AM WEST

Description

Location: Europe > Portugal > Algarve

Date Photo Taken: April 22, 2011

© Copyright. You cannot use! Only Encyclopedia of Life (EOL)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

bugle hedgenettle Stachys ajugoides

Observer

faerthen

Date

June 30, 2015 05:13 PM PDT

Description

Skunky!

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

royal penstemon Penstemon speciosus

Observer

faerthen

Date

June 30, 2015 05:13 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

mountain coyote mint Monardella odoratissima

Observer

faerthen

Date

June 30, 2015 05:13 PM PDT
View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

Lamiales is an order in the asterid group of dicotyledonous flowering plants. It includes approximately 24,000species divided into about 20 families. Well-known or economically important members of this order include lavender, lilac, olive, jasmine, the ash tree, teak, snapdragon, sesame, psyllium, garden sage, and a number of table herbs such as mint, basil, and rosemary.

No range data available.