Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • English
    • Thread-waisted Wasps
    • sand wasps
    • Mud Daubers
    • Hunting Wasp
    • Ngaro Wiwi
  • Spanish
    • Avispas solitarias
  • Scientific Names
    • Sphecidae
  • Chinese (Traditional)
    • 細腰蜂科

Extras

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Creative Commons Flickr Photos Tagged "Sphecidae."

Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Observer

hellyessica

Date

May 21, 2016 11:08 AM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Great Golden Digger Wasp Sphex ichneumoneus

Observer

jacy

Date

July 25, 2014

Description

On Virginia Mountain Mint (Pycnanthemum virginianum)

Photos / Sounds

What

Thread-waisted Wasps Family Sphecidae

Observer

jonahevans

Date

May 20, 2016 04:57 PM CDT

Description

I saw a small wasp flying in and out of this hole.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Great Black Wasp Sphex pensylvanicus

Observer

cdbathke

Date

May 7, 2016

Description

Kingdom: Animalia, Animalia means that the animal is multicellular, a eukaryotic organism. Some undergo a process of metamorphosis later in their lives. Phylum: Arthropoda, An arthropod is an invertebrate animal having an exoskeleton (external skeleton), also a segmented body, and jointed appendages (paired appendages). This includes the insects, arachnids, myriapods, and crustaceans. Subphylum: Hexapoda, Hexapoda constitutes of the largest number of species of arthropods and includes the insects as well as three smaller groups of wingless arthropods: Collembola, Protura, and Diplura. The Collembola are very abundant in terrestrial environments. Hexapods are named for their most these few feature: a thorax with three pairs of legs. Most other arthropods have more than three pairs of legs. Class: Insecta, Insecta are the most diverse of all the animal groups. There are more species of insects than there are species of all the other animals combined. There are so many insects that no one knows quite how to count them all the best we can do is make estimates. Order: Hymenoptera (Ants, Bees, Wasps and Sawflies) Hymenoptera is the third-largest order of insects, comprising the sawflies, wasps, bees, and ants. Over 150,000 species are recognized, with many more remaining to be described. The name refers to the wings of the insects, but the original derivation is ambiguous. A key characteristic of this order is that the hind wings are connected to the fore wings by a series of hooks. Family: Sphecidae, Sphecidae are a cosmopolitan family of parasitoidal wasps that includes sand wasps, mud daubers, and other thread-waisted wasps.
The Great black wasp is a species of social, females and male wasps mate once a year. After mating, female will hibernate in the ground or in an enclosed space until the winter passes. The males will die. In the spring, the female wasp starts her colony by laying eggs in cell-like pods. Larvae will then hatch from the eggs and are fed by the female. Adult workers emerge 10 days later and care for the eggs. Some female worker wasps are sterile, their purpose is to nourish the baby wasps and assist the queen. As the spring progresses, more eggs, larvae and workers are produced. Near the end of summer, the male wasps will grow from the unfertilized eggs. Fertile females develop from the well-fed larvae. The insects mate and the process begins again in the next summer.
The Great black wasp lives across most of North America and grows to a size of 20–35 mm (about 1.5 in). The larvae feed on living insects that the females paralyze and carry to the underground nest. They sting them three times and it just paralyzes the animal.
The only adaptation that I found was that they weren’t as common in the northwest but can still be here, so they must be adapting to our climate or migrating this way. You can tell it’s a Great black wasp because of thread waist (slim slender part to the abdomen). Another way you can identify it is by the antenna and the pattern of the wings since all bugs have a distinct pattern to their wings.
References:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sphex_pensylvanicus
http://nature.mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/great-black-wasp http://www.orkin.com/stinging-pests/wasps/great-black-wasp/
http://bugguide.net/node/view/5530

Photos / Sounds

What

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber Sceliphron caementarium

Observer

santillanaale

Date

May 21, 2016 04:37 PM CDT

Description

Flying from flower to flower, near creek.

Photos / Sounds

Square

Date

May 23, 2016

Photos / Sounds

What

Thread-waisted Wasps Family Sphecidae

Date

May 23, 2016

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Blue Mud Dauber Chalybion californicum

Observer

dlbowls

Date

May 22, 2016 11:28 AM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

bosqueaaron

Date

May 22, 2016

Place

salado, tx (Google, OSM)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Great Black Wasp Sphex pensylvanicus

Observer

jacy

Date

July 31, 2014

Description

Virginia Mountain Mint (Pycnanthemum virginianum)

Photos / Sounds

Observer

mlodinow

Date

May 9, 2016

Place

karval, co (Google, OSM)
View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

The Sphecidae (Latreille, 1802) are a cosmopolitan family of wasps that include digger wasps, mud daubers, and other familiar types that all fall under the category of thread-waisted wasps. Both of the traditional definitions of the Sphecidae (the conservative one, where all the sphecoid wasps other than ampulicids and heterogynaids were in a single large family, and the more refined one, where the seven large sphecid subfamilies were each elevated to family rank) have recently been...

No range data available.
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