Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • Spanish
    • Hongo
  • English
    • Glistening Inkcap
    • Mica Cap
  • Scientific Names
    • Coprinellus micaceus
    • Coprinus micaceus
  • German
    • Glimmertintling

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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

What

Mica Cap Coprinellus micaceus

Observer

dpom

Date

April 2, 2014

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Coprinus micaceus Coprinellus micaceus

Observer

leslie_flint

Date

March 8, 2014

Photos / Sounds

What

mica cap Coprinellus micaceus

Observer

julbar

Date

October 26, 2013

Description

I think I have the correct one. Let me know, please, if not - thanks

Photos / Sounds

Date

October 9, 2013

Description

Found at base of a maple tree.

Tags

Photos / Sounds

What

Mica Cap (Coprinellus micaceus) Coprinellus micaceus

Observer

coachwhipbooks

Date

October 3, 2013

Photos / Sounds

Observer

nils2

Date

October 3, 2013

Description

growing off of hardwood log

Photos / Sounds

What

Hongo Coprinellus micaceus

Observer

negronahual

Date

June 23, 2013

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Mica Cap Coprinellus micaceus

Observer

benmhogan

Date

the past

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Mica Cap Coprinellus micaceus

Observer

herzomeg

Date

June 4, 2013

Description

A mushroom! Finally! This species has gills that are nearly free from the stem, appearing a white-ish grayed color. The stem is silky smooth and hollow. They are edible and most appetizing when young.

Photos / Sounds

What

Mica Cap Coprinellus micaceus

Observer

benmhogan

Date

May 17, 2013

Photos / Sounds

What

Coprinus micaceus Coprinellus micaceus

Observer

jackl

Date

May 8, 2013

Description

I was clearing grass from our hops patch when I found these guys in scattered groups. A little digging showed some decomposing wood under the soil which would account for their substrate.

This is an edible species which i've tried several times. These ones went into a delicious pasta sauce.

Micaceus is a member of the inky cap family, meaning that in older specimens, the caps will turn black and oily, eventually dissolving. But while they are young and prime these guys are easy to tell with their small button caps, striations (lines), and especially the gold specks which dot them and reflect sunlight. The stipes are white and the gills are crowded and white-to- black depending on age.

They start decomposing about an hour after you pull them so you want to get cooking quickly!

Photos / Sounds

Observer

emele

Date

May 25, 2013 09:30 AM PDT

Description

A small patch going along the underground root of a Black Cottonwood tree. Growing among some leaf litter.

View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

Coprinellus micaceus is a common species of fungus in the family Psathyrellaceae with a cosmopolitan distribution. The fruit bodies of the saprobe typically grow in clusters on or near rotting hardwood tree stumps or underground tree roots. Depending on their stage of development, the tawny-brown mushroom caps may range in shape from oval to bell-shaped to convex, and reach diameters up to 3 cm (1.2 in). The caps, marked with fine radial grooves that extend nearly to the...

No range data available.