Classification
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  • Scientific Names
    • Antrodiaetus
    • Atypoides

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Creative Commons Flickr Photos Tagged "Antrodiaetus."

Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Square

Date

July 12, 2015 10:00 PM PDT

Description

#blurry #iphone

Photos / Sounds

6711971621 f7b0550423 s

Observer

rjadams55

Date

January 16, 2012

Description

This turret is the burrow entrance for the California Turret Spider Antrodiaetus riversi (family Antrodiaetidae). These were found along the East Ridge Trail at Armstrong Woods State Park in Sonoma Co., CA. This makes them part of the "Bay Area clade", a genetically distinct group of turret spiders found through the Coast Range mountains from Santa Cruz County to southern Humboldt County.

Photos / Sounds

6342772844 bc985aec5a s

Observer

rjadams55

Date

November 13, 2011

Description

This is the burrow entrance of a California Turret Spider (Antrodiaetus riversi, family Antrodiaetidae). Relative of the tarantulas and trapdoor spiders, scattered colonies of turret spiders are found in wooded and chaparral covered areas across much of central and northern California.

Based on their location, these are part of the Valley clade, a genetically distinct collection of spiders found on both sides of Central Valley and in the Sutter Buttes. Oddly, these individuals appear to build conspicuously shorter "turrets" than members of the nearby Monterey and Bay Area clades, even when similar construction materials are available.

This individual was part of a colony on the Moses Springs Trail at Pinnacles National Monument, San Benito Co., CA.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

rjadams55

Date

October 29, 2011

Description

These burrows belong to the California Turret Spider (Antrodiaetus riversi, family Antrodiaetidae). This is part of an ancient group of spiders in the same suborder as the tarantulas and trapdoor spiders (Mygalomorphae). Based on research by Starrett and Hedin (2007) these individuals are part of the Monterey clade, a geographically and genetically isolated population of these fascinating spiders.

They are nocturnal hunters, waiting at night at the entrance of their turrets. When an insect walks across one of pine needles or other debris woven into their turret, it acts as a trigger, signaling to the spider the prey's location and size.

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

kueda

Date

July 1, 2015 09:08 PM PDT

Description

This one used lichen in its turret construction, a choice that we endorsed whole-heartedly. Also, Trent is the best turret tickler ever.

Photos / Sounds

Square

Date

July 1, 2015 10:26 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

beartracker

Date

March 14, 2015

Place

Redway, CA (Google, OSM)

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

damontighe

Date

April 5, 2015 02:00 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

direbecca

Date

April 4, 2015

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

devonatbouverie

Date

April 4, 2015 03:10 PM PDT

Description

About a centimeter in width, it is home to the turret spider, who only comes out at night

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

tsummers

Date

April 4, 2015 03:08 PM PDT

Description

Turret spider nest

Photos / Sounds

Observer

bjoelle

Date

March 26, 2015 09:30 AM PDT

Description

At the base of a Doug Fir. Can't remember What makes these?

View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

Antrodiaetus is a spider genus in the family Antrodiaetidae with species found in the United States and Japan.

No range data available.