Classification
Within iNaturalist.org

All Names

  • English
    • batfishes
  • Scientific Names
    • Ogcocephalidae
  • Spanish
    • Peces murciéllago

Extras

Taxonomic changes »

Taxon schemes »

Make taxonomic Flickr tags for this taxon »

Invite photos from other sites »

Wikipedia taxobox »

Tree Browser »

Search descendant taxa »

Embed a widget for this taxon on your website »

420394896 5421c93440 sMagnifier 96888 98 68Magnifier 96888 98 68Magnifier 5188095968 ec5112e6f5 sMagnifier 5188095968 ec5112e6f5 sMagnifier 91124 98 68Magnifier 91124 98 68Magnifier 8092332369 390401bacf sMagnifier 7213350520 e1619fe97a sMagnifier 7988400760 da024b9108 sMagnifier 4515937596 eb74a05c9b sMagnifier 4515931820 2444514f9a sMagnifier 4515234617 3e997720ca sMagnifier 28469 98 68Magnifier
Creative Commons Flickr Photos Tagged "Ogcocephalidae."

Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Shortnose batfish Ogcocephalus nasutus

Observer

rpmann

Date

December 24, 2013

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Shortnose batfish Ogcocephalus nasutus

Observer

cmstinson

Date

March 16, 2004

Description

Hand-caught in shallow water on west side of island, examined, photographed, and released.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Shortnose batfish Ogcocephalus nasutus

Observer

josecolorado

Date

June 11, 2014

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Shortnose batfish Ogcocephalus nasutus

Observer

lovelyclemmy

Date

April 19, 2014 12:30 PM GYT

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Shortnose batfish Ogcocephalus nasutus

Observer

lovelyclemmy

Date

April 20, 2014 10:30 AM GYT

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Shortnose batfish Ogcocephalus nasutus

Observer

lovelyclemmy

Date

April 20, 2014 12:30 PM GYT

Photos / Sounds

Observer

hartvillestuff

Date

July 8, 2013

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Shortnose batfish Ogcocephalus nasutus

Observer

callieoldfield

Date

June 1, 2013
View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

The Ogcocephalidae are a family of bottom-dwelling, specially adapted fish. They are sometimes referred to as seabats, batfishes, or anglerfishes. They are found in tropical and subtropical oceans worldwide. They are mostly found at depths between 200 and 3,000 m (660 and 9,840 ft), but have been recorded as deep as 4,000 m (13,000 ft). A few species live in much shallower coastal waters and exceptionally may enter river estuaries.

No range data available.