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    • Ceratobatrachidae

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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

What

Rough-Backed Forest Frog Platymantis corrugatus

Observer

carmelo_lopez

Date

October 10, 2013

Photos / Sounds

Observer

kogia

Date

September 25, 2011 11:32 AM HKT

Description

Tiny frog that jumped across my path and hid in leaf litter.

It could be several Platymantis species that I have since researched but the colouration didn't match any photos that I found online. Its size and shape also look very similar to a Leptolalax species that I am more familiar with.

Thanks to Arvin Diesmos of Philippine herpwatch.org who identified it as P. corrugatus.

Photos / Sounds

What

Platymantis dorsalis (common forest frog) Platymantis dorsalis

Observer

kogia

Date

September 26, 2011 06:27 PM HKT

Description

Found in Rajah Sikatuna National Park, I'm uncertain of the id, but P. dorsalis does seem the most appropriate.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

kogia

Date

September 25, 2011 10:59 AM HKT

Description

Tiny frog that jumped across my path and hid in leaf litter.

It could be several Platymantis species that I have since researched but the colouration didn't match any photos that I found online. Its size and shape also look very similar to a Leptolalax species that I am more familiar with.

Thanks to Arvin Diesmos of Philippine herpwatch.org who identified it as P. corrugatus.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

kogia

Date

September 26, 2011 06:26 PM HKT

Description

Found in Rajah Sikatuna National Park, I'm uncertain of the id. It could be several Platymantis species that I have since researched and looks very similar to a Leptolalax species that I am more familiar with.

They were calling loudly (whistle-like) hidden within rock crevices and within rotting logs, they seemed to be very common at this location.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Common Forest Frog Platymantis dorsalis

Observer

tonyg

Date

June 12, 2011

Description

Many of this species were calling within town. Two were observed calling, one from on top of a grass clump about two feet up, the other from a crevice on a dirt bank (this individual is pictured on the right). Another individual was captured as it hopped across the path. It was almost twice the size of all other individuals of this species observed (left in pic). After being photographed in daylight individuals were released at their points of capture.
If you are familiar with Asian frogs please check the id on this species.

Photos / Sounds

5458308962_eca7a7d533_s

What

Rough-Backed Forest Frog Platymantis corrugatus

Observer

bjsmit

Date

July 31, 2010

Place

Bilar (Google, OSM)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Common Forest Frog Platymantis dorsalis

Observer

tonyg

Date

June 4, 2011

Description

Many of these small frogs began calling in the late afternoon, after a rain, and continued until later at night when things began to dry out. All called from individual locations, usually hidden on an inclined bank (but then almost everything here is on a steep incline). Searching by flashlight we were able to locate three and capture two. The two were held until morning, photographed and released at their individual capture locations. The two captured individuals were calling from- a) beneath a dead leaf on a rock and b) on a piece of plastic wrap caught up in the ground cover. Both were about 4-5 inches above ground level.
I am unsure of this identification. I am using Alcala and Brown's "Philippine Amphibians". They describe the advertisement call of the male as a "whistling sound" which is definitely NOT the way I would describe this frog's call. I have many other pics, including the ventral surface. If you are familiar with Philippine herps and can help with this id please drop me a note.

View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

The true frogs, family Ranidae, have the widest distribution of any frog family. They are abundant throughout most of the world, occurring on most continents except Antarctica. The true frogs are present in North America, northern South America, Europe, Asia, Madagascar, Africa, and from the East Indies to New Guinea; the species native to Australia—the Australian wood frog (Hylarana daemelii)—is restricted to the far north.

No range data available.