Globally Endangered (EN) (Source: IUCN Red List)

Classification
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All Names

  • Scientific Names
    • Pinus albicaulis
  • English
    • Whitebark Pine
  • French
    • pin √† √©corce blanche

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Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whitebark Pine Pinus albicaulis

Date

June 25, 2016 07:17 AM PDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whitebark Pine Pinus albicaulis

Date

June 25, 2016 07:09 AM PDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

What

Whitebark Pine Pinus albicaulis

Date

June 25, 2016 06:39 AM PDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

What

Whitebark Pine Pinus albicaulis

Date

June 25, 2016 06:35 AM PDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

What

Whitebark Pine Pinus albicaulis

Observer

caraleigh

Date

June 7, 2016

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whitebark Pine Pinus albicaulis

Observer

spauls

Date

May 14, 2016

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

The only whitebark pine I found on this ridge, it has been underburned, maybe one stem of the clump may survive, Tower Fire, Washington. There may be a few additional trees around but I did not see any. Location approximate within 200 feet.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whitebark Pine Pinus albicaulis

Observer

beefybeanz285

Date

May 20, 2016 10:22 AM EDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

What

Whitebark Pine Pinus albicaulis

Observer

marisbee

Date

October 17, 2015 10:10 AM PDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Seemed to be the only pine species along most of Bishop Pass Trail

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Whitebark Pine Pinus albicaulis

Observer

jherime

Date

September 26, 2015 03:12 PM MDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whitebark Pine Pinus albicaulis

Observer

dgreenberger

Date

September 8, 2015 08:41 AM PDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

What

Whitebark Pine Pinus albicaulis

Observer

pkleeman

Date

August 1, 2015 10:29 AM PDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Whitebark Pine Pinus albicaulis

Observer

dwright

Date

July 30, 2015

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Confirmed from cones on low tree. This is also a historic location in museum records (a.k.a. "Lambert" Dome). Mountain hemlock (_Tsuga mertensiana_) also in general vicinity.

View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

Pinus albicaulis, with many common names including whitebark pine, white pine, pitch pine, scrub pine, and creeping pine, occurs in the mountains of the Western United States and Canada, specifically the subalpine areas of the Sierra Nevada, the Cascade Range, the Pacific Coast Ranges, and the Rocky Mountains from Wyoming through the Continental Ranges. It shares the common name creeping pine with several other "creeping pine" plants.

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Conservation Summary

  • Globally
    Endangered (EN) (Source: IUCN Red List)
    Vulnerable (G3G4) (Source: NatureServe)
    Vulnerable. A common tree where it occurs, it is limited to only upper subalpine forests of many western North American mountain ranges. It is, however, severly threatened in the majority of its range by introduced white pine blister rust (<i>Cronartium ribicola)</i>, outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (<i>Dendroctonus ponderosae</i>), succession resulting from decades of fire suppression, climate change resulting in decreases in suitable habitat, and various synergies between these factors. Although a few areas such as the southern Sierra Nevada in California and the interior Great Basin ranges, as well as scattered stands in the rest of the range, still appear to contain large numbers of relatively healthy trees, it is expected that the blister rust will eventually become abundant in the vast majority of the range, causing significant tree mortality. Tree mortality rates exceeding 50% have already been documented in numerous parts of the range. A small percentage (1-5%) of trees appear naturally resistant to the blister rust, and restoration strategies hope to propagate these genotypes for use in restoration, although even rust-resistant trees will remain threatened by other factors. In addition, it has relatively low genetic variation and exists as a fragmentary species, making it more vulnerable than its range might indicate. This is a keystone species of high-elevation western ecosystems whose decline is expected to have cascading effects on ecosystem function and biodiversity.
No range data available.
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