Classification
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All Names

  • Scientific Names
    • Strepsiptera
  • English
    • Twisted-winged Insects
    • Twisted-winged Parasites

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Creative Commons Flickr Photos Tagged "Strepsiptera."

Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

mattiamenchetti

Date

June 22, 2016 10:39 PM CEST

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

scottking

Date

April 3, 2016 02:52 PM CDT

Description

Twisted-winged Insect, pupae
on Andrena
St Olaf Natural Lands
Northfield, Minnesota

Photos / Sounds

Observer

alderash

Date

September 18, 2002

Description

Parasite on Polistes sp.
Indoors.
Thanks to Mattia Menchetti (Italy) for ID (and noticing it in the first place).

Photos / Sounds

What

Twisted-winged Insects Order Strepsiptera

Date

June 26, 2015 01:30 PM MYT

Description

Sessile twisted-wing parasite in a wasp's abdominal segment. The animal is really unclear in these images, but you can see the bulge clearly in the first picture, and (barely) the whole sticking-out-part in the second. Unfortunately, taking pictures of a very small part of a big, wriggling wasp in a reflective plastic bag with a clumsy macro lens is rather difficult.

The wasp's observation is https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/2240722 .

I sometimes caught insects in net temporarily, and put the really really flighty and dangerous ones in a plastic bag for ease of picture-taking. They were released.

Tags

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

rcurtis

Date

August 8, 2012
View all observations

Description from Wikipedia

The Strepsiptera (translation: twisted wing, giving rise to the insects' common name, twisted-wing parasites) are an endopterygote order of insects with nine extant families making up about 600 species. The early-stage larvae and the short-lived adult males are non-sessile, but most of their lives are spent as endoparasites in other insects, such as bees, wasps, leafhoppers, silverfish, and cockroaches.

No range data available.
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