Baltic Rush

Juncus balticus

Baltic rush is native to salt marshes in coastal New England, but has recently spread inland along heavily-salted roadways. 7

Juncus balticus is a species of rush known by the common name Baltic rush. This plant is widespread in occurrence and can reach a height of about three feet.

The Baltic Rush ( Juncus Balticus ) can be found in Europe, Asia, most of western and northeastern North America, and down to the Andes of South America. The baltic rush fruits are found in capsules. The leaves of a rush can turn from red to light brown then to dark brown. The early spouts of a rush were eaten raw, rosated, or boiled before eaten. They also were used by Native Americans to weave baskets, and to dye items.The plant had also been used to make fermented drinks. The plant’s symbol is JUBA.

“Baltic rush is native to salt marshes in coastal New England, but has recently spread inland along heavily-salted roadways.(Juncus Balticus ( Baltic Rush )” The center stem of the plant is around 1-3mm. The plant has red/brown sheaths that are ½-6’’ long. The fruit capsule has at least 3 seeds in it, and is 3.5-4.5mm long. The plant has an unusually thick stem.

The Baltic Rush is 1-3’ tall. “There are 5-50 spikelets per panicle.” The petals and sepals have a green middle ( later becoming brown ). Their anthers are a pale/yellow color. “The blooming period occurs from late spring to early summer, lasting about 1-2 weeks.” They release their seeds during summer. Mature seeds are brown and measure 0.5-1 mm length wise.( Baltic Rush ) “Rush seeds are eaten by Waterfowl, Songbirds, small mammals, Jack Rabbits, Cottontail, Muskrat, Porcupine, Quail, and Gopher. (Martin 1951)”

By Gabriela Rey (13) & Julie Gonzales (13) from Albuquerque Sign Language Academy

1.“Baltic Rush ( Juncus Balticus ).” United States Department of Agriculture. 12 April 2019.

2.“Juncus Balticus ( Baltic Rush ).” Native Plant Trust. 12 April 2019.

3.“Baltic Rush” Illinois Wildflowers. 12 April 2019.

4.“BALTIC RUSH Juncus balticus Willd.” United States Department of Agriculture. 16 April 2019.

Sources and Credits

  1. (c) Alexis López Hernández, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND), https://www.inaturalist.org/photos/21229765
  2. (c) twr61, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC), https://www.inaturalist.org/photos/21850475
  3. (c) twr61, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC), https://www.inaturalist.org/photos/21850479
  4. (c) twr61, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC), https://www.inaturalist.org/photos/21850497
  5. (c) Raphaela E. Floreani Buzbee, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC), https://www.inaturalist.org/photos/10151705
  6. (c) sboudreau, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC), http://inaturalist.ca/photos/9337005
  7. Adapted by Sara Ayers from a work by (c) Wikipedia, some rights reserved (CC BY-SA), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juncus_balticus

More Info

iNat Map

Flower purple
Fruits capsules