House Sparrow

Passer domesticus

Summary 2

The House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) is a small common sparrow worldwide. Both sexes have a brown back streaked with black. Males and females are easily distinguished; males have a black bib, a grey crown with chestnut sides, and white cheeks. Females and juveniles have a duskier appearance, and lack the black bib seen in males. Outside of the breeding season, they form large noisy flocks

To hear sounds of House Sparrows:http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/house_sparrow/sounds

Where on Campus? 3

House sparrows are common in all areas of campus.

Habitat 4

House Sparrows like areas that have been modified by humans, including farms, residential, and urban areas. They are absent from uninhabited woodlands, deserts, forests, and grasslands.

Food habits 5

Nesting This sociable species nests in colonies, in feather-lined holes, cavities and building crevices nests are built in crevices and holes in buildings, tree holes and nest boxes.

Feeding House Sparrows eat various kinds of seed supplemented by some insects.

Distribution 6

Native to Old World (northern Scandinavia and northern Siberia south to northern Africa, Arabia, India, and southeast Asia). Introduced and established as a resident in North and South America, West Indies , Hawaii (all main islands), south and east Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and many other areas of world (AOU 1998).
Their introduction into North America occured in 1851, when a group of 100 birds from England was released in Brooklyn, New York.

Migration 3

Resident

Sources and Credits

  1. (c) Lip Kee Yap, some rights reserved (CC BY-SA), http://www.flickr.com/photos/64565252@N00/440570894
  2. Adapted by gillian360 from a work by (c) Wikipedia, some rights reserved (CC BY-SA), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passer_domesticus
  3. (c) gillian360, some rights reserved (CC BY-SA)
  4. Adapted by gillian360 from a work by (c) The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-SA), http://eol.org/data_objects/18664756
  5. Adapted by gillian360 from a work by (c) The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-SA), http://eol.org/data_objects/18664761
  6. (c) NatureServe, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC), http://eol.org/data_objects/28830455

More Info

Member of the iNaturalist Network   |   Powered by iNaturalist open source software