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What

Sea-Fig Carpobrotus edulis

Observer

christine70

Date

May 24, 2017 09:13 AM PDT

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What

Cock's-Foot Dactylis glomerata

Observer

christine70

Date

June 14, 2012 05:54 PM PDT

Description

Orchardgrass es una hierba perenne agresiva que está muy extendida en California. Crece en cualquier tipo de suelo, es resistente a la sequía y puede invadir algunas praderas. Orchardgrass es un pasto deseable, pero ha escapado de cultivos en muchas áreas naturales en todo Estados Unidos.
Puede invadir los bosques de roble y desplazar a los pastos nativos. Es una amenaza emergente en los pastizales costeros de pradera.
La vida silvestre se lo comerá.
Orchardgrass llegó con colonos europeos en el siglo XVIII.
Reconócelo:
Es una hierba de tallo delgado que crece de 18 a 4 pies de alto. Se desarrolla en grupos. Las hojas son azuladas, de media pulgada de ancho, planas y con una costilla blanca en el centro. Florece de mayo a agosto, flores amarillas en un grupo compacto. De dos a cuatro racimos estarán en una rama, cerca de la punta.
La rama más baja se separa como el espolón en el pie de un gallo, por lo que a veces se llama Pie de Gallo.
Controlarlo:
Las hierbas de racimo se pueden tirar con la mano. En áreas extensas, el glifosato es efectivo.

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What

Milk Thistle Silybum marianum

Observer

christine70

Date

May 24, 2017 08:42 AM PDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

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What

Milk Thistle Silybum marianum

Observer

christine70

Date

May 24, 2017 08:42 AM PDT

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What

Milk Thistle Silybum marianum

Observer

christine70

Date

May 24, 2017 08:42 AM PDT

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What

Turkey Vulture Cathartes aura

Observer

christine70

Date

August 21, 2017

Description

These vultures lined up on fenceposts before the eclipse.

Photos / Sounds

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What

California Ground Squirrel Otospermophilus beecheyi

Observer

christine70

Date

August 21, 2017

Description

Squirrels bothered tourists as usual during the eclipse.

Photos / Sounds

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What

American Crow Corvus brachyrhynchos

Observer

christine70

Date

August 21, 2017

Description

Crows didn't take much notice of the eclipse.

Photos / Sounds

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What

Northern Elephant Seal Mirounga angustirostris

Observer

christine70

Date

August 21, 2017

Description

The seals pretty much ignored the eclipse.

Photos / Sounds

What

Fuller's Teasel Dipsacus fullonum

Observer

christine70

Date

May 24, 2017

Description

Teasels are easily identified with their oval seed head, prickly stems and leaves. The seed heads are used in flower arrangements.
Teasel was brought to the U.S. from Europe for use in wool processing. Birds eat the seeds.
Recognize it:
There isn’t anything else that looks like this. The plant is biennial, growing over two or three years. It’s a rosette for its first year or two, growing its taproot and storing up nutrients to flower and seed. It bolts up a tall stalk, six feet or more and grows its distinctive egg-shaped flower. The flowering stems and heads remain. The head is full of seeds, most of which land within five feet of the plant. The seeds remain viable for at least two years.
Its long taproot allows it to draw nutrients other plants cannot access.
Control it:
Eradicate this invader as soon as a single one appears, before it has a chance to flower and produce seed. Cut it at the roots an inch or more deep. Pull it out by hand.
Manage an established infestation by creating a boundary around it and preventing further spread. Mow it before it flowers and sets seeds. Mow more than once as it re-sprouts. Disc or plow if appropriate.
Herbicides are effective, but can kill native plants. Chemicals are most effective at the rosette stage. Consult a professional.
Encourage healthy native plants. Reseed with native seeds after removing Teasel. Persistence and a long-term commitment are needed to overcome it. Plan to spend years discouraging it until it is gone.

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What

Prickly Sow Thistle Sonchus asper ssp. asper

Observer

christine70

Date

July 8, 2017

Description

It’s native to Eurasia but has now invaded all of North America.
Recognize it: It grows one to three feet tall, depending on the moisture and fertility of the soil. It can bolt upward and form flowerheads very quickly during the summer.
It oozes a milky latex from broken leaves and stems.
The stem can be thick but hollow, and red. Its flowers are like little dandelions. It’s not a true thistle, but its prickly leaves make its name understandable.

Control it:
The young leaves are edible, and livestock may eat them. So livestock pastures may not be invaded, because the cows take care of it.
It has a single taproot but is usually shallow rooted and easy to pull. Cutting it is also effective, although repeat cuttings will be needed. Because it produces so many seeds, return often to pull or cut new plants.
Glyphosate is effective, but consult a professional for large areas.
One study found it to have some antibiotic effects, especially on skin infections. Stick to commercial preparations and hand pull this weed from your yard.

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What

Mule Deer Odocoileus hemionus

Observer

christine70

Date

June 28, 2017

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What

Wild Turkey Meleagris gallopavo

Observer

christine70

Date

June 29, 2017

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What

Musk Stork's-Bill Erodium moschatum

Observer

christine70

Date

July 5, 2017

Description

I've heard this called Bird's Beak, for the long, pointed seed pod. Others call it Stork's Bill. It's aggressive and out-competes native plants, covering the landscape. Livestock and wildlife can eat it, when it's young and tender. It doesn't provide good wildlife cover.
Recognize it: it starts as rosettes on the ground and grows up to 2 feet tall in its second year. It has little five-petalled pink to lavender flowers.
Control it: Pulling it or disking the soil can help control it. Dicamba and glyphosate are effective. Get professional advice.

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What

Docks Genus Rumex

Observer

christine70

Date

May 24, 2017

Description

Sheep's sorrel (Rumex acetosella) is one of the first invasive plants to grow in disturbed soil. Livestock will graze on it, but it's sour and they usually don't eat much. If they eat too much at once, the oxalates in it can poison them.

It's hard to control because it grows from a rhizome that spreads rapidly and aggressively.

Control it by pulling it, ideally before those rhizomes get established. Keep pulling it. Some herbicides work. Consult a professional.

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What

Greater Quaking Grass Briza maxima

Observer

christine70

Date

May 23, 2017

Description

Rattlesnake grass (Briza maxima), also called quaking grass, fills many of Cambria's undeveloped lots. It quickly takes over and becomes the dominant plant.

It's tolerant of frost. It grows in shady, under the oak and pine trees. It crowds out native understory plants.

Control it by mowing it close to the ground. Seed an last three or four years, so repeat annually until it's gone.

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What

Foxtail Barley Hordeum jubatum

Observer

christine70

Date

May 19, 2017

Description

Foxtail barley is different from domesticated barley. the seeds it produces, as many as 200 per plant, are sharp and can injure the animals that attempt to eat them.

It thrives in saline soil and concentrates salt in its leaves and roots.

Mowing it in spring before it forms seedheads and tilling it in fall helps control it. Its roots are very resilient. Persevere to eliminate it. Seeds can survive seven years.

Some herbicides work. Consult a professional.

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What

Common Ivy Hedera helix

Observer

christine70

Date

June 18, 2017

Description

English Ivy is sold as an ornamental plant, but it soon escapes the landscaping. It grows up and over everything in its path, including trees. It grows across the ground, choking out native wildflowers, understory shrubs and new trees.
The weight its vines add to the trees it covers makes them more likely to fall over in a storm.
It’s listed as a Noxious Weed in Oregon and Washington. It’s illegal to sell it in Oregon.
Recognize it:
Dark green, shiny, waxy leaves, typically but not always with 3 to 5 lobes. Leaves are tough and leathery. Vines grow up and over walls and trees. It flowers in the fall, small yellowish green clusters. It has blue-black berries in the spring.
Control it:
Pull vines by hand. Cut those that can’t be pulled close to the ground. Cut those climbing on trees, to kill the upper parts of the plant. The pulled plants can be left to dry out and rot or disposed of in green waste.
It will resprout from even half an inch of root. Return often to remove new growth. It will never be gone, but you can control it.
Always wear gloves. Some people are allergic to it. Leaves and berries are toxic. Do not eat any part of this plant.

Tags

ivy

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What

Bush Monkeyflowers Section Diplacus

Observer

christine70

Date

June 9, 2017 08:47 AM PDT

Description

Lots of flowers on this native plant this year.

Photos / Sounds

What

Sweet Fennel Foeniculum vulgare

Observer

christine70

Date

May 29, 2017 01:00 PM PDT

Place

cambria ca (Google, OSM)

Description

Sweet Fennel smells like licorice or anise. It’s the plant whose seeds are used in flavoring sausage, liquor and other foods. Those seeds spread across the landscape and make this plant a troublesome invader.
Sweet Fennel not only takes over space, light and soil nutrients. It may also shed substances that make it hard for other plants to grow. Even after stands of Sweet Fennel are removed, native plants do not grow.
Sweet Fennel probably arrived on the East Coast with early European settlers. It’s been in California for at least 120 years.
Recognize it:
Sweet Fennel grows 4 to 10 feet tall. It has feathery leaves and tall canes. Flowers are tiny and yellow, in clusters that form an umbrella shape.
Do not confuse it with Poison Hemlock. Always wear gloves.
Control it:
Digging out individual plants is the only sure way to remove it. mowing it keeps the roots alive and they will re-grow. Cutting the plants to reduce size may exhaust the taproot, making it easier to remove on later visits.
Herbicides triclopyr and glyphosate are effective. Consult a professional for their use.
Seeds will persist in the ground for many years.

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What

Cock's-Foot Dactylis glomerata

Observer

christine70

Date

June 14, 2012 05:54 PM PDT

Description

Orchardgrass is an aggressive perennial grass that is widespread in California. It grows in any type of soil, is drought resistant, and can overrun-some grasslands. Orchardgrass is a desirable pasture grass but has escaped cultivation in many natural areas throughout the United States.
It can invade oak woodlands and displace native grasses. It is an emerging threat in coastal prairie grasslands.
Wildlife will eat it.
Orchardgrass arrived with European settlers in the 1700s.
Recognize it:
It’s a thin-stemmed grass that grows 18 inches to 4 feet tall. It develops in clumps. The leaves are bluish, half an inch wide, flat with a white rib down the middle. It blooms from May through August, yellow flowers in a compact cluster. Two to four clusters will be on a branch, near the tip.
The lowest branch separates like the spur on a rooster’s foot, so it’s sometimes called Cock’s Foot.
Control it:
Bunch grasses can be hand pulled. Over wide areas, glyphosate is effective.

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What

Nasturtium Tropaeolum majus

Observer

christine70

Date

May 23, 2017

Description

Nasturtium is the right plant in the wrong place. It’s a pretty flower in the garden. Its leaves and flowers are even edible and nutritious, with high Vitamin C. However, once it escapes the garden, it out-competes native plants and takes over.
It’s a good companion plant in gardens, naturally deterring various insect pests. It’s especially planted around squashes and brassicas such as broccoli and cauliflower.
It’s so pretty, people use the flowers to decorate plates and on cakes.
Recognize it:
Its bright orange flowers are easy to see. Its round, nearly circular leaves are dull grayish green. It grows in trailing vines 6 to 10 feet long that climb over other shrubs.
Control it:
Hand pull it. Persuade others to eat it. If you plant it in your garden, keep it in containers so that it won’t escape. It is an annual, but reproduces by seeds. Established stands may return the following year. Pull them before they go to seed. Patrol this and it can be eliminated.

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What

Plantain Genus Plantago

Observer

christine70

Date

March 24, 2017 11:15 AM PDT

Description

Buckhorn Plantain is a perennial weed that grows from a thick crown of roots. Buds at the top of the root grow into new plants.
It is a popular medicinal herb, used as a tea of the brewed leaves or a poultice made of wet leaves.
In the wild, Buckhorn Plantain crowds out native plants. At home, it infests sports turf and ornamental gardens.
Recognize it:
Buckhorn Plantain grows as a rosette of narrow oval leaves, 3 to 12 inches long, ¾ to 1 ½ inches wide. The base of the leaves and the crown of the plant are covered in wooly hairs. Leafless flower stems grow 4 to 16 inches tall, topped with a cluster of tiny white flowers 1 to 2 inches long. Each flower can produce 2 seeds.
Control it:
Dig out the roots but be prepared to return to dig out new plants. Remove new plants before they go to seed. Buckhorn Plantain can reproduce both by the buds around the roots and by seed.
Chemical herbicides such as 2,4-D and glyphosate are effective, especially when applied in the fall.
Fabric mulches that prevent sunlight from reaching the plants can be effective. Organic mulch 6 inches deep can be effective. Return often to removed seedlings and restore the thickness of the mulch

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What

Sea Figs Genus Carpobrotus

Observer

christine70

Date

December 30, 2016 12:13 PM PST

Description

Ice plant was brought from South Africa and planted in the early 1900s to stabilize the ground for railroad tracks. Caltrans planted thousands of acres of it until the 1970s, to stabilize the soil for roads and highways. It was also sold as a landscaping plant.
It easily escapes into surrounding areas and crowds out native plants. It can change the pH of the soil it grows in, making it impossible for native plants to replace it. It increases the organic matter in the soil, changing the natural habitat.
Recognize it:
It’s a ground-hugging succulent with distinctive three-sided leaves. Ice plant has yellow or light pink flowers as large as six inches across. Sea fig is less aggressive than ice plant, with smaller leaves and deep magenta flowers. They plants cross readily, producing an intermediate plant with pink flowers.

It grows in dense mats that may be as much as 165 feet across from a single plant.

Control it:
Pull it by hand or using tools. It is easily removed, but heavy with water. Let it wilt for a few days before disposing of it in dumpsters.
It reproduces by seeds and vegetatively. Every node has the potential of sprouting roots and growing as a new plant. Every bit of it must be removed. Return periodically to remove new growth. Native plants can outcompete it if given the opportunity.

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What

Scarlet Pimpernel Lysimachia arvensis

Observer

christine70

Date

March 24, 2017 11:02 AM PDT

Description

This annoying trailing vine-like plant is famous as the emblem of the fictional hero the Scarlet Pimpernel. To landscapers, it’s known as a toxic plant that can sicken livestock and irritate human skin. Always wear gloves when working around it. Not everyone’s skin is sensitive to it.
Recognize it:
It creeps along the ground, no taller than ten inches, with strangling tendrils which can be as long as ten inches with small oval green leaves. The tiny quarter-inch, five-petal flowers are usually salmon pink to orange in the Central Coast, but can be red, bright blue or white. They open only in sunny weather, giving it the common name ‘poor man’s weather-glass.’
Control it:
Pull it by hand, best before it goes to seed. Wear gloves. Return to pull new growth regularly.
Solarization can kill the tiny seeds left in the ground. Cover the ground with clear plastic and secure it around the edge. The sun will heat the soil and kill the seeds. Leave it in place for at least six weeks

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What

Bristly Oxtongue Helminthotheca echioides

Observer

christine70

Date

December 30, 2016 12:21 PM PST

Description

Bristly Oxtongue is a nasty, prickery weed that can grow densely along trails and in fields. It crowds out native plants.
It’s used in traditional medicine as a wormer.
Recognize it:
It’s a spindly plant as tall as three feet with wide branching stiff, woody stems. The leaves have distinctive pimples. It has yellow dandelion-like flowers 1-2 inches wide nestled in cups of bristly pointed leaves.
When the stems or leaves are broken, they ooze milky sap.
Control it:
Remove it by hand pulling, string trimming or hoeing when soil is moist. Roots two inches below the surface must be removed to insure it won’t regrow. Repeated mowing may suppress plants, but they may grow back if mowing is ended.
Plants sprout from seeds into rosettes, which bolt into plants in late spring.
Herbicides such as 2,4-D and glyphosate are effective

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What

Greater Periwinkle Vinca major

Observer

christine70

Date

March 24, 2017 11:08 AM PDT

Description

Vinca major (Big Periwinkle) is a fast growing, spreading perennial vine that forms a dense carpet of ground cover. Below, its roots make a thick mat, crowding out native ground cover, tree seedlings and all other plants.
Vinca varieties are sold as landscape plants. The Big Periwinkle is the most invasive.
Vinca may alter local fuel characteristics by changing community structure, litter dynamics, fuel arrangement, and understory temperatures.
Recognize it:
Vinca’s leaves are glossy, dark green pairs 3” long, facing each other along the stem. The flowers are five-lobed blue single blooms on stems about a foot and a half long. Vinca also produces long, trailing stems without flowers.
Control it:
Hand pull it and roll it up. Since it resprouts from root and stem fragments, anything left behind is likely to grow a new plant. Or, cut the plants close to the ground and cover the area with weed fabric, black plastic or cardboard and leave it for a year or two before restoring vegetation.
Spraying the cut stems immediately, within a minute, after hand removal with a 2 percent glyphosate solution may kill it.
Let the plants dry out on tarps and decompose, or bag and dispose of it as green waste.
Monitor the area and continue to pull new growth every three months.

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What

New Zealand Spinach Tetragonia tetragonoides

Observer

christine70

Date

December 30, 2016 12:11 PM PST

Description

Young leaves of New Zealand Spinach are edible, raw in salads or cooked. Older leaves get bitter and tough. Perhaps we can persuade people to remove it and eat it. It escaped from gardens and has become naturalized on the Central Coast. It spreads and forms a dense web of roots and vines that chokes out native vegetation.
It is not a true spinach. It tolerates heat and drought better than spinach. Salty soil doesn’t bother it. It thrives on the Central Coast.
Native people rarely ate it. Captain Cook’s expedition in the 18th century consumed it as a cure for scurvy. It is a good source of Vitamin C.
Recognize it:
Slightly fuzzy, triangular leaves on trailing vine-like stems. It grows thick and crawls over obstacles.
Control it:
Pull up by the roots. The heavy vegetation can be rolled into mats. Allow it to wilt for a few days to reduce water weight. Dispose in green waste bins.

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What

Kikuyu Grass Pennisetum clandestinum

Observer

christine70

Date

May 19, 2017 05:35 PM PDT

Description

Kikuyu Grass came to America from East Africa as a ground cover to reduce erosion. It establishes quickly and grows fast. Once it escaped its boundaries, those qualities made it an unwelcome invader.
Some commercial varieties have desirable turf qualities, but the Kikuyu Grass on our landscape is tough and invasive. It chokes out other plants.
It has a photosynthetic pathway that allows it assimilate food rapidly, so it can grow as fast as an inch a day. It can expand to cover 4 square feet a month.
Recognize it:
Kikuyu Grass leaves are light green, 1 to 10 inches long. Kikuyu Grass covers the ground with a network of fleshy stems that take root along the stem. It forms a thick thatch on the surface and an underground network of stems. Each stem can reproduce a new plant.
It can grow over fences and into trees and shrubs. It can grow up from the ground as much as 18 inches.
Control it:
Hand pulling can be effective before it gets established and takes over a large area. Cutting it can create new plants. Solarization, covering it with clear plastic and letting the sun kill it with heat, can be effective. Herbicides such as glyphosate can control it. Consult a professional.

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What

Cape-Ivy Delairea odorata

Observer

christine70

Date

December 26, 2016 01:59 PM UTC

Description

Cape Ivy is an attractive vine that curls around tree trunks and meanders across the landscape. Its smooth, bright green leaves and stems hold water, making this vine able to survive long dry periods. Any part of the plant except the leaves can root if it touches the ground. It reproduces from plant parts, not seeds. Any bit of plant left behind may resprout. It is so difficult to eradicate that it may be more reasonable to contain it by clearing a perimeter around a section to control it.
Recognize it:
Cape Ivy is a climbing perennial vine. Vines form dense mats of vegetation over trees and shrubs, killing plants underneath. It is toxic to animals. It can kill fish when plant materials are soaking in waterways. Stem, rhizome and stolon fragments resprout if left in the ground after treatment.
Control it:
Contain the patch, then remove all vegetation. Hand pull all that you can see. Dig out stolons, the points along the vine where it takes root, although this may not be possible in archaeologically sensitive sites. Let it dry out and then bag it and dispose of it in green waste. Repeat frequently, every two months in moist areas and not less often than every six months in dry places. Expect to spend three or four years removing bits and pieces of Cape Ivy to eradicate it. Native plants will eventually return.
It can be sprayed with a weak glyphosate solution. Check for details. The concentration needs to be weak so that it does not kill the leaves but is absorbed and transported to kill the stolons.

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