Icon
Photos / Sounds
Species / Taxon Name
Observer
Place
Actions

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

August 26, 2019 02:24 PM BST

Description

An Observation linked to and with https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/31634362
This is an uncommon leaf bremish seen on Atriplex (Chenopodioideae) that is undoubtedly a fungus. I knew it as Ascochyta caulina (annotation photo 10). But taxonomists and recent researchers may have confused me (us all!)
.
There is little precise and supportive information that I can find. But I will add it as it becomes available

This is a convincing link, from which I have derived this current Identification. (BRC is National Biological Records Portal) https://www.brc.ac.uk/psl/photo/stagonospora-atriplicis
And the GBIF Portal here
https://www.gbif.org/species/2619464 shows an old record in my County and some interesting watercolours.
.
Not all the photos are taken at the same location.

Photos / Sounds

What

Sunflower White Rust Pustula tragopogonis

Observer

dejaym

Date

September 16, 2020 09:03 AM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

This has quite a few names but Pustula tragopogonis seems to be the latest one. I know it as Albugo tragopogonis but had just begin to call it Pustula obtusata. Never mind, Taxonomists know best. I do not like the common name here as this is really not on sunflower but Common Groundsel (Senecio vulgaris)

The first picture shows it sharing with Puccinia lagenophorae on the same leaf, with Pustula underneath, the other on top.
It is so like Albugo lepigoni - https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/57742403

Photos / Sounds

What

Plantain Mildew Golovinomyces sordidus

Observer

dejaym

Date

July 16, 2019 04:23 PM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

A common mildew and found more often on the leaves of Plantago major and similar broadleaved Plantago species.

Here, it is shown on Plantago maritima as a white powdery coating.
In this case the plant is shared by Golovinomyces sordidus which produces the small pustules seen in Pictures 10 & 11
BOTH occurring on the same plant in this location - picture 12
Picture 13 shows typical spore-chain of powdery mildew (on Filipendula ulmaria - Meadowsweet)

Golovinomyces sordidus
https://bladmineerders.nl/parasites/fungi/ascomycota/pezizomycotina/leotiomycetes/erysiphales/erysiphaceae/golovinomyces/golovinomyces-sordidus/
and
https://www.naturespot.org.uk/node/122990

Podosphaera plantaginis
http://www.bioref.lastdragon.org/Erysiphales/Podosphaera_plantaginis.html

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

October 9, 2020 08:23 AM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

Emerging name for Ascochyta caulina (P. Karst.) Aa & Kestere**
It is hard keeping up with Taxonomy, so perhaps read some of the exchange here
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/31634362.

This is a fungal infection of Atriplex patula (Chenopodioideae) leaves. It is a very common but under-recorded organism. Easily spotted on the leaves of this prolific upper shore plant, which occurs Worldwide
https://www.gbif.org/species/3083728 and thus should, perhaps, have yielded more records of the associated fungi.
Close inspection of infected leaves, reveals well defined pycnidia, beyond which I have not progressed.

** https://bladmineerders.nl/parasites/fungi/ascomycota/pezizomycotina/dothideomycetes/pleosporales/ascochyta/ascochyta-caulina/

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

August 27, 2020 11:25 AM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

A small, almost invisible organism.
An obligate parasite of Spergularia (Sea Spurrey), causing ‘white rust’ or ‘white blister’.
Sporangiophores appear on the host's stem, causing it to swell and burst. The white powdery spores are then dispersed by wind and rain.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

August 17, 2020 03:25 PM BST

Description

The EGGS of this rarely recorded Ichneumonidae.
It is a known behaviour of this species, which is a specialist in parasitizing Puss Moth (Cerura vinula) larvae.
These appear to be mites but have no legs or visible mouthparts and are very glossy.
By good fortune they are described here
https://www.amentsoc.org/publications/bulletin/articles/observations-of-netelia-vinulae.html
.
EDIT 2021
Added three photos

Photos / Sounds

What

Sand Binder Rhodothamniella floridula

Observer

dejaym

Date

October 1, 2019 03:43 PM BST

Description

An unexpected encounter with a huge swathe of the Sand Binder. Areas of tightly compacted sand, with eroded edges and bald areas. No doubt about identity but difficult to prove without more pigmentation - picture 8
What is remarkable is that the sand, where bound by the fine algal strands, was very difficult to dislodge, requiring gnarly fingers or, better, a penknife.
This is a Winter seaweed - a gorgeous red when in full bloom - picture 9
Picture 6 shows Cladostephus fronds

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

August 7, 2020 08:18 AM BST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

August 4, 2020 10:22 AM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

On Filipendula ulmaria leaves. Few world records.and not much Web-Information. I am pretty certain of ID.
See https://www.commanster.eu/Commanster/Fungi/Asco/Mycosphaerellaceae2.html

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

July 14, 2019 03:06 PM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

Atriplex is common in Europe and the pale edge-rolls seen on the leaves are easily IDd as H.atriplicis. But for completeness one should always look for and photograph the Aphid, which is usually found inside the pseudogall.
.
Hayhurstia atriplicis is actually an aphid. We infer that the pale leaf-roll found on several species of Atriplex, is caused by the aphid's attention to the under-surface of the leaf of Atriplex.
It is a sound assumption IF you can discard three other organisms, two diptera and one fungus.
Their effects on the leaf are quite different, so it's a fairly easy call.

The pseudo-gall itself is very distinctive, pale, swollen, tightly inrolled (curled) and distorted. It is important to look for the Aphid, and photograph it for 'final' evidence.

The Aphid - https://bugguide.net/node/view/480464
The gall - https://www.naturespot.org.uk/species/hayhurstia-atriplicis
Some science - https://influentialpoints.com/Gallery/Hayhurstia_atriplicis_chenopodium_aphid.htm

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

July 21, 2020 02:48 PM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

Hayhurstia atriplicis is actually an aphid. We infer that the pale leaf-roll found on several species of Atriplex, is caused by the aphid's attention to the under-surface of the leaf of Atriplex.
It is a sound assumption IF you can discard three other organisms, two diptera and one fungus - Picture 7. Their effects on the leaf are quite different, so it's a fairly easy call.
The pseudo-gall itself is very distinctive, pale, swollen, tightly inrolled (curled) and distorted. It is important to look for the Aphid, and photograph it for 'final' evidence.

The Aphid - https://bugguide.net/node/view/480464
The gall - https://www.naturespot.org.uk/species/hayhurstia-atriplicis
Some science - https://influentialpoints.com/Gallery/Hayhurstia_atriplicis_chenopodium_aphid.htm

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

July 2, 2020 10:16 AM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

On tiny Aspen Populus tremula saplings. There is plenty of willow nearby but they much prefer my precious Aspen

Photos / Sounds

What

Scalycaps Genus Pholiota

Observer

dejaym

Date

October 2, 2019 03:20 PM BST

Description

These two pictures came into my life recently (they are not mine). They seem to be a few cms high and near beech trees in woodland
I am between puff balls (Lycoperdon) and Slime moulds (Myxogastria)

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

November 24, 2019 01:47 PM GMT

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

One of three - two Locations
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/36022955
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/35927209
My third Observation
It is widespread at this new location.

I do not find micrography easy but in this case the most obvious features appear in all Online Publications.
Typically here https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Zygogonium-ericetorum-Habitat-a-macroscopic-appearance-b-and-d-and-photomicrographs_fig1_257994888
and
https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/The-green-alga-Zygogonium-ericetorum-Charophyta)-Herburger-Remias/5287c242f2989a0f5d25afa61aebb34a4fe64c96/figure/3

Filament type B1 in pictures 7 & 8 is quite different to the main ones and yet seems to be present in all samples - it is VERY distinctive
My cell-phone app is used for under-lighting (light table App)
I used this key successfully
https://www.algalweb.net/search4.htm
I am very grateful to @roman_romanov for the original ID.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

November 24, 2019 01:45 PM GMT

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

My second Zygogonium ericetorum in as many days.
These pictures are taken 14 days later than for the previous record and I expected a much greener result - it was colder and wetter. But the samples still show the ferrous tone that is indicative of species-form.
It is widespread on the headland.
I do not find micrography easy but in this case the most obvious features appear in all Online Publications.
I am mystified by the filament in picture 14
My cell-phone app is used for under-lighting - Picture 13
I am very grateful to @roman_romanov for the initial ID.

Some online links
https://d3i71xaburhd42.cloudfront.net/5287c242f2989a0f5d25afa61aebb34a4fe64c96/6-Figure2-1.png From -https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/5287/c242f2989a0f5d25afa61aebb34a4fe64c96.pdf?_ga=2.20015160.1429334316.1574614158-141978553.1574287727
and
https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Zygogonium-ericetorum-Habitat-a-macroscopic-appearance-b-and-d-and-photomicrographs_fig1_257994888

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

November 5, 2019 02:20 PM GMT

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

FRESHWATER Algae. a whole mystery in very acidic, peat stained water. High on a ericaceous moor

Photos / Sounds

What

Hairy Sea-Mat Electra pilosa

Observer

dejaym

Date

November 16, 2019 02:34 PM GMT

Description

Electra pilosa and Membranipora membranacea are the common mats found on seaweed fronds. Superficially they are very similar but close inspection will reveal one (E.pilosa) comprises quite oval cells, the other (M.membranacea) very rectangular cells.
They both form extensive and easily spotted small carpets, patches and coatings on the surfaces of Seaweeds.
I have chosen to put them both in the same Observation so as to show the main differences

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

October 1, 2015 11:25 AM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

A common miner that clears whole Birch (Betula) leaves. It is very study-friendly.

During 2017 I found this miner in Alder (Alnus viridis) leaves. All the specimens were either dead or were to die in the leaves. The evidence was accepted here
https://bladmineerders.nl/parasites/animalia/arthropoda/insecta/hymenoptera/symphyta/tenthredinidae/heterarthrinae/scolioneura/scolioneura-betuleti/

Photos / Sounds

What

Persian Walnut Juglans regia

Observer

dejaym

Date

September 22, 2019 03:02 PM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

The UK's most northerly Walnut tree is in my garden. It is only 9 feet high and bears no fruit. It was grown from seed collected from Oxfordshire in 2001. The leaves a distinguishable as are the scars on its spindly stem.
There are only a few (maybe 8) of these north of this in the whole World. The most northerly is here https://www.gbif.org/occurrence/2408954874

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

September 16, 2019 11:32 AM CEST

Description

An obscure epiphytic red seaweed that occurs on a number of much larger seaweeds..
Here shown in blades of Porphyra (Nori)
It is not well described on the Web but pictorial evidence is very strong.
See https://www.algaebase.org/search/species/detail/?species_id=365
http://v3.boldsystems.org/index.php/Taxbrowser_Taxonpage?taxid=77842
Also see
Picture 10 - the host
My own Sporangia image is picture 8
See https://www.researchgate.net/figure/A-C-Acrochaetium-sagraenum-Montagne-Bornet-A-Main-filament-with-stalked-and-sessile_fig4_250212744
and
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/4660/0b2b9acd906a3a70c481a17efcee70593152.pdf.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

September 1, 2019 03:50 PM BST

Description

Sonchus asper (Sow thistle) leaves

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

August 26, 2019 02:21 PM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

On Atriplex species leaves
Usually circular blotch with distinct black pycnidia.
Not rare but massively under-recorded.

see https://bladmineerders.nl/parasites/fungi/ascomycota/pezizomycotina/dothideomycetes/pleosporales/ascochyta/ascochyta-caulina/

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

December 29, 2016 12:58 PM GMT

Description

I have visited 10 distilleries where this fungus is rampant. Usually expresses as sooty staining on external walls, nearby trees, signposts and street furniture. It forms on structures up to 600 metres (downwind?) away from Distilleries and Bond Warehouses. It is known to cause unsightly staining on nearby modern dwellings.
It is granular and can be scraped from the surface and cultivated. Here we see examples on structures at the Blair Athol Distillery, as well as one or two from other locations..
3 Pictures showing the distinctive spore chains
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baudoinia_compniacensis

Photos / Sounds

What

Solid Surfclam Spisula solida

Observer

dejaym

Date

July 7, 2019

Description

The most telling quick ID feature is shown in picture 3, they fit to form a near circle.
But, as always, we need to rely on the inside architecture for a perfect ID, thought it is sometimes difficult to photograph the features and NOT always conclusive.
It is worth looking closely at the upper and lower surfaces of hinge left-valve laterals and inner surfaces of right-valve lateral - they are serrated, worth seeking out, satisfying to observe. Pictures 9 & 10.
This is a broadly triangular, very robust and common shell.

Photos / Sounds

What

Deer Fern Struthiopteris spicant

Observer

dejaym

Date

June 23, 2019 12:02 PM BST

Description

Hard fern is common in most Orkney wilderness. One does not have to check the spore arrangement to ID to species.

Photos / Sounds

What

Sand Binder Rhodothamniella floridula

Observer

dejaym

Date

May 22, 2019 12:26 PM CEST

Description

This is not always deep red. It matures and propagates in January and is quite red from October..
During the summers, it loses pigment and growth but the fine, binding, filaments still hold the sand together.
It is not so easily seen and what 'turf' shows, is the same colour as the sand. One needs to collect a small portion (not easy) and examine through a x10 glass to see the compacted sand grains holding the filaments tightly.
Quite widespread.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

June 10, 2019 09:36 AM BST

Description

A third, perhaps final, Observation of Sea Felt from me. This from a new location and giving the opportunity to again suggest that good pictures showing the overall morphology, of a light brown 'cloud' matted on the shore and probably attached to fucus species, is almost as good as detailed micro-pictures. I believe this can be identified in the field if one is careful to avoid any fine seaweed that has visually discernible filaments. The filaments of Sea Felt cannot easily be seen by naked eye.
Picture 4 shows a typical form of Sea Felt, there seems to be a central stem but this a feature of the fine threads coalescing into a bulky cord. Slip a hand under it and the threads themselves will not be discernible.
Pictures 5 and 6 contain no Sea Felt.
With a good x10 glass one can resolve the filament cords, where twining has occurred - picture 8. Picture 9 shows how fine the filaments are.
See also https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/26565760
and
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/26669986

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

June 9, 2019 08:37 AM BST

Description

Sea Felt may best be identified from its overall morphology. It appears most often as a brown cloud attached to Fucus but can occur washed in unattached.
It is incredibly fine close-to and cannot be identified with just close up photos. It is JUST possible to see, via a x10 glass, the woven filaments which appear to make very fine 'ropes' - if you can see those, then you're on a good bet - Picture 11. Beyond that you will have to spend quite a time at the microscope to get photos of the minute features that ID it positively - the general cell structure and the specific presence of intercalary sporangia, mid-length of those microscopic filaments will thus conform the ID - Picture 12.
In short BOTH views are normally required for ID, one general view of its overall morphology and one of the 'rope' structure or the mid-filament reproductive cells.

See http://www.outerhebridesalgae.uk/marine/marine-species.php?id=40
and
http://www.seaweedsofalaska.com/species.asp?SeaweedID=49

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

June 5, 2019 03:23 PM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

Pylaiella littoralis is a brown 'cloud' epiphyte on Fucus seaweeds, I've seen it on F.serratus (its preferred host), F.vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum but it may be found on others. Indeed it is often found apparently free-growing.
One needs a good glass (x10 is just OK) to ID this, as the spirally woven threads are almost unique to this. But to be certain Microscopy is needed.
See then, http://www.outerhebridesalgae.uk/marine/marine-species.php?id=40

Photos / Sounds

What

Red-banded Yellowjacket Vespula rufa

Observer

dejaym

Date

May 27, 2019 01:05 PM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

The Red Wasp tends to look like any wasp until you spot the overall 'redness' or the reddish spots. But they can only be confirmed by facial recognition - the iNat. AI ID system here isn't up to that. yet!
Visited yesterday by the Tree Wasp and the Red Wasp in the same hour. They are not common here.
See http://www.eakringbirds.com/eakringbirds2/insectswaspsidentification.htm?fbclid=IwAR3piG2ngoUIp3Aowpoopql2AunR1juf0XaRkgWKQT8LsJnsf0YOHu558NU

Feeds: Atom