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Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

October 1, 2015 11:25 AM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

A common miner that clears whole Birch (Betula) leaves. It is very study-friendly.

During 2017 I found this miner in Alder (Alnus viridis) leaves. All the specimens were either dead or were to die in the leaves. The evidence was accepted here
https://bladmineerders.nl/parasites/animalia/arthropoda/insecta/hymenoptera/symphyta/tenthredinidae/heterarthrinae/scolioneura/scolioneura-betuleti/

Photos / Sounds

What

Persian Walnut Juglans regia

Observer

dejaym

Date

September 22, 2019 03:02 PM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

The UK's most northerly Walnut tree is in my garden. It is only 9 feet high and bears no fruit. It was grown from seed collected from Oxfordshire in 2001. The leaves a distinguishable as are the scars on its spindly stem.
There are only a few (maybe 8) of these north of this in the whole World. The most northerly is here https://www.gbif.org/occurrence/2408954874

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

September 16, 2019 11:32 AM CEST

Description

An obscure epiphytic red seaweed that occurs on a number of much larger seaweeds..
Here shown in blades of Porphyra (Nori)
It is not well described on the Web but pictorial evidence is very strong.
See https://www.algaebase.org/search/species/detail/?species_id=365
http://v3.boldsystems.org/index.php/Taxbrowser_Taxonpage?taxid=77842
Also see
Picture 10 - the host
My own Sporangia image is picture 8
See https://www.researchgate.net/figure/A-C-Acrochaetium-sagraenum-Montagne-Bornet-A-Main-filament-with-stalked-and-sessile_fig4_250212744
and
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/4660/0b2b9acd906a3a70c481a17efcee70593152.pdf.

Photos / Sounds

What

Sonchus Rust Miyagia pseudosphaeria

Observer

dejaym

Date

September 1, 2019 03:50 PM BST

Description

Sonchus asper (Sow thistle) leaves

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

August 26, 2019 02:21 PM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

On Atriplex species leaves
Usually circular blotch with distinct black pycnidia.
Not rare but massively under-recorded.

see https://bladmineerders.nl/parasites/fungi/ascomycota/pezizomycotina/dothideomycetes/pleosporales/ascochyta/ascochyta-caulina/

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

December 29, 2016 12:58 PM GMT

Description

I have visited 10 distilleries where this fungus is rampant. Usually expresses as sooty staining on external walls, nearby trees, signposts and street furniture. It forms on structures up to 600 metres (downwind?) away from Distilleries and Bond Warehouses. It is known to cause unsightly staining on nearby modern dwellings.
It is granular and can be scraped from the surface and cultivated. Here we see examples on structures at the Blair Athol Distillery, as well as one or two from other locations..
3 Pictures showing the distinctive spore chains
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baudoinia_compniacensis

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

July 7, 2019

Description

The most telling quick ID feature is shown in picture 3, they fit to form a near circle.
But, as always, we need to rely on the inside architecture for a perfect ID, thought it is sometimes difficult to photograph the features and NOT always conclusive.
It is worth looking closely at the upper and lower surfaces of hinge left-valve laterals and inner surfaces of right-valve lateral - they are serrated, worth seeking out, satisfying to observe. Pictures 9 & 10.
This is a broadly triangular, very robust and common shell.

Photos / Sounds

What

Deer Fern Struthiopteris spicant

Observer

dejaym

Date

June 23, 2019 12:02 PM BST

Description

Hard fern is common in most Orkney wilderness. One does not have to check the spore arrangement to ID to species.

Photos / Sounds

What

Sand Binder Rhodothamniella floridula

Observer

dejaym

Date

May 22, 2019 12:26 PM CEST

Description

This is not always deep red. It matures and propagates in January and is quite red from October..
During the summers, it loses pigment and growth but the fine, binding, filaments still hold the sand together.
It is not so easily seen and what 'turf' shows, is the same colour as the sand. One needs to collect a small portion (not easy) and examine through a x10 glass to see the compacted sand grains holding the filaments tightly.
Quite widespread.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

June 10, 2019 09:36 AM BST

Description

A third, perhaps final, Observation of Sea Felt from me. This from a new location and giving the opportunity to again suggest that good pictures showing the overall morphology, of a light brown 'cloud' matted on the shore and probably attached to fucus species, is almost as good as detailed micro-pictures. I believe this can be identified in the field if one is careful to avoid any fine seaweed that has visually discernible filaments. The filaments of Sea Felt cannot easily be seen by naked eye.
Picture 4 shows a typical form of Sea Felt, there seems to be a central stem but this a feature of the fine threads coalescing into a bulky cord. Slip a hand under it and the threads themselves will not be discernible.
Pictures 5 and 6 contain no Sea Felt.
With a good x10 glass one can resolve the filament cords, where twining has occurred - picture 8. Picture 9 shows how fine the filaments are.
See also https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/26565760
and
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/26669986

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

June 9, 2019 08:37 AM BST

Description

Sea Felt may best be identified from its overall morphology. It appears most often as a brown cloud attached to Fucus but can occur washed in unattached.
It is incredibly fine close-to and cannot be identified with just close up photos. It is JUST possible to see, via a x10 glass, the woven filaments which appear to make very fine 'ropes' - if you can see those, then you're on a good bet - Picture 11. Beyond that you will have to spend quite a time at the microscope to get photos of the minute features that ID it positively - the general cell structure and the specific presence of intercalary sporangia, mid-length of those microscopic filaments will thus conform the ID - Picture 12.
In short BOTH views are normally required for ID, one general view of its overall morphology and one of the 'rope' structure or the mid-filament reproductive cells.

See http://www.outerhebridesalgae.uk/marine/marine-species.php?id=40
and
http://www.seaweedsofalaska.com/species.asp?SeaweedID=49

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

June 5, 2019 03:23 PM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

Pylaiella littoralis is a brown 'cloud' epiphyte on Fucus seaweeds, I've seen it on F.serratus (its preferred host), F.vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum but it may be found on others. Indeed it is often found apparently free-growing.
One needs a good glass (x10 is just OK) to ID this, as the spirally woven threads are almost unique to this. But to be certain Microscopy is needed.
See then, http://www.outerhebridesalgae.uk/marine/marine-species.php?id=40

Photos / Sounds

What

Red-banded Yellowjacket Vespula rufa

Observer

dejaym

Date

May 27, 2019 01:05 PM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

The Red Wasp tends to look like any wasp until you spot the overall 'redness' or the reddish spots. But they can only be confirmed by facial recognition - the iNat. AI ID system here isn't up to that. yet!
Visited yesterday by the Tree Wasp and the Red Wasp in the same hour. They are not common here.
See http://www.eakringbirds.com/eakringbirds2/insectswaspsidentification.htm?fbclid=IwAR3piG2ngoUIp3Aowpoopql2AunR1juf0XaRkgWKQT8LsJnsf0YOHu558NU

Photos / Sounds

What

Tree Aerial Yellowjacket Dolichovespula sylvestris

Observer

dejaym

Date

May 27, 2019 11:20 AM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

Quite a large wasp, of two sorts, on the cotoneaster yesterday. This is the Tree Wasp which tends to look like almost any wasp until you look at the face.
See http://www.eakringbirds.com/eakringbirds2/insectswaspsidentification.htm?fbclid=IwAR3piG2ngoUIp3Aowpoopql2AunR1juf0XaRkgWKQT8LsJnsf0YOHu558NU

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

May 21, 2019 02:38 PM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

This is the classic appearance of P.caricina - Ribes uva-crispa, aecial stage.
Here seen residing on Gooseberry (Ribes uva-crispa). IF I could establish and show the associated alternate host (of a Carex) then this may indeed be an observation of Puccinia caricina var pringsheimiana.
Clearly seen here is the discrete and isolated aecia surrounding the spermogonia spots on a dull red background - these are classic features of the organism.
See https://www.discoverlife.org/20/q?search=Puccinia+caricina
and
https://bladmineerders.nl/parasites/fungi/basidiomycota/pucciniomycotina/pucciniales/pucciniaceae/puccinia/puccinia-caricina/
Picture 6 & 7 are from the same host bush and are not typical morphology but almost certainly P.caricina

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

April 16, 2019 01:37 PM BST

Description

Colaconema caespitosum (J.Agardh) Jackelman, Stegenga & J.J.Bolton
An awkward red alga needing close examination. It is so like Rhodothamniella floridula seen here https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/18142388
This was found on limpets and nearby concrete surfaces but not yet on other algae. It is very tough yet soft to the touch. Only with a penknife was it possible to remove a portion to examine at home. To separate the fine red filaments took quite an effort with tweezers. This is not like the long stranded easy to pluck sand binder.
Picture 1 shows the area around the limpet grazed and one can see that the limpet itself is not grazed. Though I believe they DO graze each other's shells.

See
http://www.seaweed.ie/descriptions/Colaconema_caespitosum.php
and
http://www.algaebase.org/search/species/detail/?species_id=14661
and
http://www.aphotomarine.com/red_seaweed_colaconema_caespitosum.html

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

May 1, 2019 03:55 PM BST

Description

Bonnemaisonia hamifera Hariot, 1891 The filamentous Trailliella phase
So probably NOT
Asparagopsis armata - Falkenbergia phase

This will not be an easy agree but the evidence is below - they are very similar.
http://www.algaebase.org/search/species/detail/?species_id=9
and
http://www.aphotomarine.com/red_seaweed_bonnemaisonia_hamifera_trailliella_phase.html
and
http://www.algaebase.org/search/species/detail/?species_id=9&sk=20
...
Similar to
http://www.aphotomarine.com/red_seaweed_asparagopsis_armata_falkenbergia.html

Photos / Sounds

What

Gutweed Ulva intestinalis

Observer

dejaym

Date

May 1, 2019 02:29 PM BST

Description

The Genus Ulva are not easy to get to species. One must present either strong evidence, via microscopy or properly researched evidence.
One picture of a green narrow strand or mess will not stand up. It needs proper photo-evidence. Ideally some close ups are required to SHOW the distinguishing features.
However, perhaps the easiest Ulva is this one. When located it should look like green intestines and ideally will have floating expanded tubes, contorted, twisted and showing some nearly transparent sections. It should be sampled in and out of water. Out of water it may appear flat but must be hollow. In water will inflate and often float.

Whilst microscopy may be necessary to ID beyond doubt, few people can ID it from the cell structure. And so we are left with the need to illustrate it thoroughly. I hope I have.
Here, where I live it grows in luxuriously clean seas, fairly high on shorelines. It tolerates low salinity but not excessive drying
See https://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/greatlakes/FactSheet.aspx?SpeciesID=1714&Potential=N&Type=0&HUCNumber=DGreatLakes
and
http://www.seaweed.ie/descriptions/ulva_intestinalis.php

Photos / Sounds

What

Green Algae Phylum Chlorophyta

Observer

dejaym

Date

March 12, 2013 03:39 PM UTC

Description

If you are a SeaweedPhreak then you'll need to toast Lily Newton today. It's her 125th birthday.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lily_Newton
I don't think she is well known outside the UK but her book is in the possession of every Phycologist I know.
A few green seaweeds then, easy to exploit and photograph but not easy to describe and annotate in fine detail - THAT is what her book is about, fine detail.
Published in 1931 and getting rare.
EDIT 27/01/19 - reordered pictures.
Portrait Picture 11 - Copyright Free
© National Portrait Gallery, London

Photos / Sounds

What

Sand Binder Rhodothamniella floridula

Observer

dejaym

Date

January 5, 2019 03:02 PM UTC

Description

A new location. This is quite a dynamic seaweed, coming and going with wave action but usually prolific when boulders at low water are surrounded by sand.

Photos / Sounds

What

European Painted Top Shell Calliostoma zizyphinum

Observer

dejaym

Date

December 22, 2018 02:07 PM UTC

Description

A lovely shell when fresh and wet!
http://www.seawater.no/fauna/mollusca/zizyphinum.html

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

November 21, 2018

Description

Two very similar species, sometimes the difference is obvious, sometimes not.
They can each be smooth stemmed, oval, have epiphytes, bend easily or lose their fronds.
The very best way to separate them all, but these two particularly, is by slicing the stipe.
One is usually very sticky with mucus, the other not.
The internal lozenge is quite different in each.
You need a knife, a thin section, camera in one hand, slice in the other - click.
Have fun!

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

December 20, 2018 12:23 PM UTC

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

Prolific when found but not easy to see. We see the brood pouch, attached to the insect.
Inside, under the lid, are 35-60 tiny (0.2mm) eggs.
See https://www.magnoliabox.com/products/chionaspis-salicis-willow-scale-rs-9060

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

December 17, 2018 11:10 AM UTC

Description

This occurs on both Fucus serratus (Saw wrack) and Fucus vesiculosus (Bladder wrack) see https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/17877449.
It MUST be worth looking for when sifting through well established fucus, near the bottom on the tide (low in the zone)
It is distinctive and possibly cannot be confused with others.
I am always trying to demonstrate that one picture is rarely enough and close-ups are desirable. Photos in and out of water help tremendously.
But with most species, microscopy is not required IF you can show the main features.
Try to show scale or say the size. Adding ID notes, IF you know what it is, will help educate others.

This then, grows as soft tufts (small shrubs) on the upper surfaces or at the edges of Fucus vesiculosus:
♥ brown,
♥ soft
♥ tufted
♥ up to 2cms long
♥ epiphytic on Fucus

Photos / Sounds

What

Dulse Palmaria palmata

Observer

dejaym

Date

December 17, 2018 12:53 PM UTC

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

We need to take our time over seaweeds. It is rarely sufficient to show one view of a washed-up frond.
Take time to tease it out a bit in-situ and shoot it several times.
Please show scale and drop a bit in the water and show it immersed. Look for any possible distinguishing features and shoot those too.
It is usually far too late when home and forming the Observation which is why I often take a piece home and lay it on a light-table for a last look.
Do add some notes to your observation:
♥ deep, translucent red;
♥ long narrow straps as fronds;
♥ smooth (slippery) and tough;
♥ short oval stipe;
♥ attached to Kelp stems;
♥ lovely edge-leaves etc..

Oh yes, it's worth the effort and everyone gains.

Photos / Sounds

What

Dulse Palmaria palmata

Observer

dejaym

Date

August 14, 2015 08:34 AM BST

Description

Dulse is best identified when red - it is the key feature. Long, tough, deep red fronds with a narrow smooth stipe and little edge leaflets growing - perfect!.
It is mostly found as an epiphyte on Kelp (usually Laminaria hyperborea) but is also lithophytic
It is always best to cast around for perfect specimens, as it soon degrades, (sometime fading to sad green) in the surf and strandline.

Photos / Sounds

What

Blue-rayed Limpet Patella pellucida

Observer

dejaym

Date

December 14, 2018 02:53 PM UTC

Description

My fourth, maybe final, observation of this delight.
Partnered with -
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/18435310
and
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/18270468

It was once known once as the Hartlepool Horn Limpet.
HERE
It is worth reading on a little to get a feel for the language used in those days.
This was at a time when it was fashionable for biologists to vie with each other, often re-describing a well-known species again and again in the hope of attribution in the Nature journals of the day. Known then by a few as the Horn-shell, it was found on a beach in Hartlepool UK by James Petiver (c. 1665 – c. 2 April 1718)

The little jeweil-of-a-shell was known to, and named by, Linnaeus in 1758.
But I suspect he did not handle the late stage shell which, for a few years, was considered a separate species with various popular names. One, which hung on for years, was Patina pellucida leavis (Pennant, 1777)
But in 1778 Emanuel Mendes da Costa wrote
"This species of Limpet in its states of young and old is extremely different that it seems two distinct species and for such authors have both figured and described them."
The rest, of course, is history

Photos / Sounds

What

Sea Comb Plocamium cartilagineum

Observer

dejaym

Date

January 30, 2018 12:01 PM UTC

Description

With nearly 200 Observations of this, I can't help thinking that Observers here are missing a trick, usually posting only one distant photo of this, one of the most structurally interesting seaweeds.
Plocamium cartilagineum occurs around the World, from Antarctica to Iceland and British Columbia, Japan and Patagonia to New Zealand, in one form or another. Ignoring the difficulties of separating a Californian version (Plocamium cartilagineum ssp. pacificum) from the rare UK one (Plocamium maggsiae) and three or four others with minor microscopic differences (www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/09670262.2011.565129) and (https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09670260500192935) It is an easy ID from the little combs.
Sure enough it has a complex and taxing taxonomy but a simple overall morphology - in short, they could all be called Comb Weed or what we, in the UK, call Cock's-comb. A couple of close photos and almost immediately it'll be good enough for Research Grade

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

June 29, 2015 11:21 AM BST

Description

We have to accept that adults NOT the proven result of breeding-through from specific larvae may indeed be falsely identified.
All these pictures are taken at the very beginning of the leaf turning period on very immature, soft, green leaves or Salix pentandra in mid to late June, earliest 4th and latest 29 June, over a two year period.
Those with distorted antennae may be very recently emerged.

The pictures are nearly all taken at the same location, within a day or so of what was probably local emergence from the soil or roots and NOT from dead leaves or any of the upper old structures of the trees.

Several attempts at breeding through in one year resulted in only one flawed and distorted example. The ill-formed pupa contained a full-grown adult that looked like these ones but I have NO reasonable photographic evidence.
See http://v3.boldsystems.org/index.php/Taxbrowser_Taxonpage?taxid=153646
Partnered with
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/18732793
and
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/18754014

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dejaym

Date

July 19, 2017 04:07 PM BST

Place

Orkney, UK (Google, OSM)

Description

Euula destricta (Syn. Phyllocolpa carinifrons).
All from Salix pentandra from four locations in Orkney UK
Showing Edge Gall, Larvae and feeding spots.
See also https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/18732793
With assistance from @jonathan142 and @bazwal

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