New target species

Hi Everyone!
nobody has found a Pionosomus varius for a while, so I think it's time to choose a new target species.
@carnifex suggested in https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/32838192 that I could try and find a Similar Fruit Fly (Drosophila simulans), and I thought that would be a good next target. D. simulans looks very similar to D. melanogaster, and a good photo of the abdomen of a male is needed for a species ID. @carnifex could go through our Drosophila observations to help find photos of D. simulans. Here's the best iNat photo of that species, to give you an idea of what they look like:

I've also got a question for the members of this project; Should we leave the Pionosomus varius challenge open, and have this as a second challenge at the same time, or should we close the other one down?

Good luck finding a Drosophila simulans,
Alexis

Posted by alexis_orion alexis_orion, October 01, 2019 05:58

Comments

Thumb

@carnifex @inasiebert @jakob @jansson @martingrimm @mobbini @mister_bumble @lovesdaryl just letting all the project members know :D

Posted by alexis_orion 6 months ago (Flag)
Thumb

Hi,

like the idea of a new challenge species a lot. Might be difficult to find Pionosomus varius in the autumn and winter. Thanks a lot for taking action!

I think whomever finds a Pionosomus varius next year shall get an honourable mention, but the e-Cup is given out now only for Drosophila simulans :)

What do the others think?

What about the new target species? Can I improve my chances to find him by some or other fruit in the kitchen?

Cheers to all
Monika

Posted by mobbini 6 months ago (Flag)
Thumb
Posted by mobbini 6 months ago (Flag)
Thumb

Sorry for not-taking-part in the challenge actually. Little time on the computer, very little observation range - but still love to be outside more than sitting in front of the computer (never had 200 unpublished photos on the computer before...)

I thought about the project: My primary intention was to improve the observation of rare or difficult to find species. It is not necessary to have only one target species. What would you think about a "bucket list" or something like this?

Cheers and keep observing, Martin.

Posted by martingrimm 6 months ago (Flag)
Thumb

Just some little input about how find the target species:

The fly is attracted to the same food sources as its sibling species D. melanogaster. One difference, however, is that it does not like to enter buildings. Chances are much higher to find it on the balcony or in the garden (I could elaborate more on why this is the case, but will leave it as is for the moment). Right now is the best time finding fruit flies. In my traps, the target species outmatches D. melanogaster in numbers.

Only males are usually reliably identifiable, and only from lateral shots, where the male abdominal ending is visible. Just shoot at every fly you see :-)

@martingrimm Maybe we could come up with a bucket list over the cold and dark winter days. Maybe we can add one new species every month or so? And about the intention of this challenge, I feel that D. simulans is one of the most underrepresented species on iNat, given its worldwide distribution and its frequency.

Posted by carnifex 6 months ago (Flag)
Thumb

@carnifex: I just wanted to say I wouldn't delete any target species. And everybody should list interesting species.
Unfortunately, we have a lot of moths in our flat - but almost no Drosophila. But I will check every fly I find ;).

Posted by martingrimm 6 months ago (Flag)
Thumb

so, we finally reached November. Should we add another hard to find (winter-)species on the target list?

Posted by carnifex 5 months ago (Flag)
Thumb

I'd be up for that - does anyone have an idea what?

Posted by alexis_orion 5 months ago (Flag)
Thumb

I'm also open for any ideas! – but have no winter species inspiration :-/

Posted by mobbini 5 months ago (Flag)
Thumb

Wie wärs mit dem Winterhaft Boreus hyemalis? Ich habe ihn noch nie gesehen, aber es wäre eine selten beobachtete Art und die adulten Tiere sind nur im Winter zu beobachten. Hier ein paar Infos dazu https://www.insekten-sachsen.de/Pages/TaxonomyBrowser.aspx?id=223691

Posted by fuerchtegott 3 months ago (Flag)
Thumb

Ein toller Vorschlag! Ich hatte die bisher immer nur in alpine Regionen verortet, wusste nicht dass die so weit verbreitet sind.

Posted by carnifex 3 months ago (Flag)
Thumb

Gute idee, die art werde ich zur liste auf der projektseite hinzufügen.

Posted by alexis_orion 3 months ago (Flag)
Thumb

Oh ja, fantastisch!

Posted by mobbini 3 months ago (Flag)

Add a Comment

Sign In or Sign Up to add comments

Is this inappropriate, spam, or offensive? Add a Flag