Photos / Sounds

What

Rain Frogs Genus Eleutherodactylus

Observer

weathergaltx

Date

September 9, 2017 08:29 PM CDT

Place

Texas, US (Google, OSM)

Description

Saw 3 individuals in 'the limestone wall'. Got good pix of just 2.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Evening Skimmer Tholymis citrina

Date

July 3, 2017 06:29 PM CDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Brown-headed Cowbird Molothrus ater

Observer

kucycads

Date

July 23, 2017 05:56 PM CDT

Description

yellowish breast, associated with Red-winged Blackbirds

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Human Homo sapiens

Observer

greglasley

Date

June 12, 2012

Description

@robberfly, I have found the optimal birding vehicle for you to complete your transformation to birder elite. I took this shot in Barrow, Alaska, in 2012...I know this vehicle is for you...has your name all over it. It would attract attention on the streets of San Francisco I suspect. This is more than roadside kitsch I think...

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

North American Porcupine Erethizon dorsatum

Observer

cullen

Date

October 17, 2015 06:38 AM CDT

Description

Game Cam

Photos / Sounds

What

Black Saddlebags Tramea lacerata

Observer

aguilita

Date

July 27, 2015

Description

Images 1-3 are of the same specimen
Image 4 is of a separate specimen
--

Black Saddlebags (Tramea lacerata)

27 July 2015: Observed several older male Black Saddlebags (Tramea lacerata) flying and perching on the edge of the north lake at South Lakes Park in Denton, Texas. The City of Denton, Texas administers South Lakes Park.

Black Saddlebags is strictly a North American dragonfly because its extensive range is found in Canada, United States and Mexico.

In Canada, according to NatureServe’s entry for this dragonfly species, two provinces host it including British Columbia and Ontario (excellent range maps are found at this site).

In the continental United States all but four states including Montana, Wyoming, and North Dakota in the West and Maine in the East do not host this dragonfly. In other words, Black Saddlebags is widely dispersed throughout the United States and with but minor exceptions it is found throughout the nation. Alaska much farther to the northwest does not host it either and neither does Hawaii presumably.

In Texas, John C. Abbott’s, Dragonflies of Texas, has this dragonfly occurring across the state and it is common where it does occur which is fairly much everywhere. This is on reflection a very resilient dragonfly and quite adaptable to all sorts of environments.

In Mexico, Dennis R. Paulson and Enrique González Soriano make clear in their “Mexican Odonata” distribution list that’s available online that Black Saddlebags is found in 11 of Mexico’s 31 states including (in alphabetical order) Baja California Norte, Baja California Sur, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Quintana Roo, Sinaloa, San Luis Potosí, Sonora, Tamaulipas, Veracruz and Yucatán.

Because of its occurrence in North America Black Saddlebags is among those dragonflies that is the most widely distributed throughout the northern latitudes of the hemisphere. Therefore it stands to say that Black Saddlebags is an iconic and quintessential resident of the Western Hemisphere.

Sources: “Mexican Odonata,” Dennis R. Paulson and Enrique González Soriano, Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Washington (http://www.pugetsound.edu/academics/academic-resources/slater-museum/biodiversity-resources/dragonflies/mexican-odonata/); NatureServe entry of Tramea lacerata (http://explorer.natureserve.org/servlet/NatureServe?searchName=Tramea+lacerata); John C. Abbott, Dragonflies of Texas: A Field Guide (University of Texas Press, 2015); Idaho Museum of Natural History, Idaho State University, entry for Black Saddlebags (http://imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/insects/drgnfly/libefam/trla/trlafr.htm)

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Green Anole Anolis carolinensis

Observer

gpstewart

Date

June 28, 2015

Description

Green Anole sitting on my wiper arm and looking through the wind shield,

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