Cumanotus sp. of Goddard and Green (2013) (undescribed)

Cumanotus

Taxonomy Work in Progress! 4

From Jeff Goddard to Robin Agarwal 4/12/2018:

The Cumanotus is a bit more complicated because the name fernaldi was applied to the wrong species in Behrens and Hermosillo (2005). Their species 245 is C. fernaldi, and yes species 244 is technically still undescribed, even though Sandra Millen seems to have long been done with the manuscript describing it. Brenna Green and I wrote the following about the situation in our 2013 development paper (which I guess makes our paper the relevant reference until the species is formally named, even though Sandra is the one who really worked it out):

Cumanotus sp.
Following Behrens (1991), Goddard (2004) referred to this species, which feeds on Ectopleura crocea (Agassiz, 1862) in bays and harbors, as Cumanotus fernaldi Thompson & Brown, 1984. However, as pointed out by S. Millen personal communication to JG, 8 Jan 2012), Thompson and Brown (1984) in their brief description of C. fernaldi were referring to the larger, soft-sediment dwelling species studied by Hurst (1967) that is ecologically and morphologically similar to the north Atlantic C. beaumonti (Eliot, 1906). Hurst (1967) used the name C. beaumonti for her specimens from Washington and reported that they laid corkscrew shaped egg masses with 4–14 eggs per egg capsule. Cumanotus sp. consistently has one egg per capsule (Goddard 1992; present study, Table 2), is ecologically and morphologically similar to the north Atlantic C. cuenoti Pruvot-Fol, 1948, and is undescribed (S. Millen, personal communication to JG, 8 Jan 2012). It is pictured as C. fernaldi in Behrens and Hermosillo (2005, species number 244), but that name actually applies to species number 245 in Behrens and Hermosillo (2005) (S. Millen, personal communication to JG, 8 Jan 2012).
Unaware that two species of Cumanotus exist in the northeast Pacific Ocean, Goddard (2004, Table 1) lumped development data for both species. The complete and correct breakdown is as follows. Based on Hurst (1967), C. fernaldi (as C. beaumonti) deposits corkscrew-shaped egg masses with 4–14 eggs per capsule that hatch after 10 days at 8–11 C with type 1 shells averaging 119 mm long. Based on Goddard (1992, 2011b) and the present study, Cumanotus sp. also deposits corkscrew-shaped egg masses, but with one egg (averaging 73 mm in diameter) per capsule, hatching after 9–10 days at 12–16 C with type 1 shells averaging 130 mm long.

Sources and Credits

  1. (c) Robin Agarwal, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC), https://www.inaturalist.org/photos/13104557
  2. (c) Robin Agarwal, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC), https://www.inaturalist.org/photos/13104464
  3. (c) Robin Agarwal, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC), http://www.inaturalist.org/photos/2351033
  4. (c) Robin Agarwal, some rights reserved (CC BY-SA)

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